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I should start making my own parts... (things are getting expensive)


TobyB

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http://www.autohausaz.com/search/product.aspx?sid=knl24eanmhks2v450rmmkhji&makeid=800003@BMW&modelid=1010754@2002&year=1973&cid=24@AC %26 Heat - Climate Control&gid=6860@AC %26 Heater Control Valve

 

$300 for a heater valve.

 I think I could carve one out of a solid block of brass and sell it at a decent wage...

Autohaus doesn't mark up BMW's stuff THAT much...

 

This is getting silly.  These are not Por-shas...

 

Post up your 'finds'- the more absurd, the better!

 

t

"I learn best through painful, expensive experience, so I feel like I've gotten my money's worth." MattL

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$320... but the shipping is "free".  That is insane...

 

I just ordered a dome light for wayyyyyy too much money this morning, but ice cream was included.

 

Ed

'69 Granada... long, long ago  

'71 Manila..such a great car

'67 Granada 2000CS...way cool

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ya know .... if that heater valve wasn't even there ..... after all, what does it do but restrict coolant flow ..... and why does it have to be on the inlet ..... a valve on the heater core outlet circuit would accomplish the same restriction task .....

 

So there may be a better solution ......

 

Cheers,

 

Carl

 

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6 minutes ago, OriginalOwner said:

ya know .... if that heater valve wasn't even there ..... after all, what does it do but restrict coolant flow ..... and why does it have to be on the inlet ..... a valve on the heater core outlet circuit would accomplish the same restriction task .....

 

So there may be a better solution ......

 

Cheers,

 

Carl

 

I don't know about that.  With the valve on the inlet side the coolant in the heater is cool until the valve is open and the engine coolant flow fills the core.   If you didn't have a valve you'd feel the heat off the heater core always. Even without the fan.  Same if you put the valve on the outlet.  The core would always be hot.  Maybe not so bad in the northern climates, but in SoCal (for instance) it would be stifling.

73 Inka Tii #2762958

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It does not matter if the valve is on the inlet or outlet side.  If there is no flow through the heater core there is no additional heat being brought to the core.  There will however always be water pressure because the side without the valve is still open to the cooling system. 

1970 1602 (purchased 12/1974)

1974 2002 Turbo

1988 M5

1986 Euro 325iC

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My thought was that there might be a "better" valve (i.e., newer and much less expensive) that can be utilized.  I would guess there are plenty of such valves in use in the auto world ..... is there such a valve that makes life easier than paying $300, and can be installed somewhere in the coolant loop to/from the heater core ??

 

Cheers,

 

Carl

 

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A newer valve would need to be from a system that still modulates water flow to work with the 2002.  The 2002 system was archaic in 1968.  Others were modulating the air flow around the core by dampering the air to mix hot and cool air.  Thus whether the car was standing still and blower was moving a certain amount of air thru the heater or traveling at highway speeds and no blower, the temperature to the cabin remained the same.  The 2002 with modulated water flow, the faster you drive, the colder the air out the heater unless the water valve lever is fussed with.  Slow down and you roast.

 

Get one of these and remove the pot.

http://www.jegs.com/i/RestoParts/759/CH28461/10002/-1

Edited by jimk

A radiator shop is a good place to take a leak.

 

I have no idea what I'm doing but I know I'm really good at it.

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Heck, the 1966 Volvo 122 valve had a thermostat that adjusted the valve based on the heater core temperature.

 

I was thinking something like this...

 

t

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  • Haha 1

"I learn best through painful, expensive experience, so I feel like I've gotten my money's worth." MattL

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W&N sells a reproduction of the all brass heater valve for the later cars:

 

https://www.wallothnesch.com/wasserventil-ab-1971-originalausfuehrung-komplett-aus-messing-incl-innenteil-kein-kunststoff-64-03-04.html

 

I really like valves that have been rebuilt using the kit from Blunt.  There's a good write-up in the Articles section that Marshall wrote on rebuilding the Heater Valve.

 

 

Edited by JohnS

1973 tii Inka - Oranjeboom

1974 tii Fjord/Primer - The Thrasher (my daily driver since 1986)

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You could put a small T handled ball valve in the engine compartment and run it like the old beetles. You'd get under the car in the fall and break the rust holding the damper shut. Run it all winter and repeat the process in reverse in the spring. Korman had heater valves in their clearance section some time back.

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