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Gas smell in cabin - let's troubleshoot from the start...


Guest Anonymous

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Guest Anonymous

Roses are red

Violets are Blue

I get headaches when i drive

how bout you?

So, assume I haven't done anything (which I obviously have), I need to fix the gas fume smell in my cabin. From beginning to end, how would you troubleshoot this problem? What would you look for? How would you fix?

Happy Holidays.

Brett

'71 2002

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Guest Anonymous

As for me, since I am doing a running frame restoration, I am starting with sealing the gas tank. I got the kit from Eastwood Company. Next I am re-running the gas line and vent line. New connection splices. Then check the vent tank in the trunk and the cannister in the engine compartment. Then new fuel filter and fuel lines in the engine compartment. I have a new Weber 32/36 so I know it isn't the issue (bad flat, jets, etc.) also check your filler tube and connections. Beyond that, if it is still there, I will just light a match while I'm in the car! German Fireworks!

You may want to examine the lines and connections first, then check the fuel tank, My problem always seems to be with a full tank. Good Luck.

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Guest Anonymous

i've noticed on both my 02's that the sending unit mounted in the top of the tank was needing to be sealed, therefore when i had a full tank, strong fuel odor.

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Guest Anonymous

I have the same issue on a '73. I am working on the crankcase ventilation system as well.. since it will cause a lot of fumes too. The PO had taken the hose from the valve cover and simply put it in an oil bottle in the engine compartment. Those fumes need to be run back into the air cleaner housing. I have a sprint filter, so I have routed the hose to the hole in the bottom of the air filter housing. I still get some fumes.. and also a fuel smell in the trunk so I am going to watch this thread too.

Do check on the state of your crankcase ventilation hose though. It is a major cause of the headache stink. I have solved this on previous cars so it is doable.

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Guest Anonymous

The problem starts with the tank. The tank is probably 75% of it:

1. Having the tank basically inside the trunk, not underneath the car, invites problems.

2. The tanks develop pinholes from rust, and the seams open up.

3. The filler neck setup is cheesy. The rubber dries, the seal isn't good, and there's this cheapo plastic fume hose that just sits in the side of the filler hood on later models.

4. The sender/fuel port gizmo is difficult to seal properly.

5. On later models, the bizarre plastic fume tank under the rear deck is a great source of cabin fumes.

6. There are vents on each C-pillar, plastic ducts that lead from the rear windscreen to the outside world. These don't seal well, so all of the fumes in the tank have a nice pathway into the cabin. Holes in the rear deck, e.g. speakers, don't help either.

My solution: throw away that tank and put in an inexpensive fuel cell, at least the seamless polyethylene type. Reroute fuel and vent lines. It's possible to install a fuel cell and preserve the stock filler mechanism, but I'm not going to bother. I'll open the trunk to fill it. You can get fuel cells equipped with gauge senders, too.

If you want to preserve the stock setup, start by rebuilding the tank. Drain it, clean it, check for holes, seal it, replace the filler hood stuff, replace all the fume vent stuff, etc.

Mike

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Guest Anonymous

That may be a good start. off my valve cover is just a filter. i didn't know what it was for, so i left it. i'll go ahead and query the local guys to have that setup correctly. thanks.

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Guest Anonymous

I seriously doubt that the tank is the culprit.

Could be the filler neck, the lines.....or crankcase issues. The tank would be the last place I'd check

on my old 02.

Funny, my first two 02's, which were nice and very well sorted out had gas smell issues. It didn't seem to bother me as much as it does you Brett. However, with two subsequent beaters.....not a whiff.

Jerry

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Guest Anonymous

the engine bay from the cabin. Check these in addition to what everyone else has mentioned. 1 seal is on the bottom of the hood the other two are on either end of the hood latch mechanism.

-J

72 tundra tii

72 agave 2002

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Guest Anonymous

Engine compartment fumes can get into the passenger cabin if your fresh air intake plenum drain valves are shoddy (these are 3 rubber tubes that hang down from beneath the cowl).

The drain tubes use a duck-bill valve to allow water out, but should normally be closed to prevent engine fumes coming in thru the heater box vents. There are also the seals up top that seal to the underside of the hood. If ANY of these seals are missing or not in shape, you can draw the engine stank to the cabin.

The drain tubes can get clogged with debris, esp. if you park where small leaves or stuff like pine needles fall onto the car. When they clog, they tend to hold rubber valve open & often never close well even after cleaning.

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Guest Anonymous

I had the same problem with the hose hanging along the firewall. I re-attached to the weber filter housing but still have the fuel fumes in the cabin and trunk. It did clear up the oily smell from the vented of crankcase fumes.

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Guest Anonymous

I have lived with it for a number of years, but if I roll

the windows up I can't smell it, I think I am now

close to find the root of the problem.

Michael

72 tii

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Guest Anonymous

the top of the fuel pickup unit. White plastic, hairline cracks everywhere. I removed it & simply connected the black fuel line hose directly onto the brass tube coming out of the fuel pickup. Cured my bad smells

JOhnL

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