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OT: planning a new garage, need some advice (very long)


Guest Anonymous

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Guest Anonymous

URL: http://bimmer.roadfly.org/bmw/forums/2002/forum.php?postid=36922

Since the new house with potential for a 3-car garage fell through, we're looking at adding onto our current house. Ours being a '50s ranch with only a 1-car garage, additional "toy" space is in order. I am looking at adding a second (separate) garage space of about 15x30' with the size being limited by location, setbacks, trees, etc, so there's not really a "GO BIGGER" option here. What I'm trying to do is plan for all the things that should be done during the building process. Here's my "plan for" list so far:

electrical - 110 & 220v

compressed air - plumbing & location for tank

lighting - primarily ceiling mounted fluorescent (lots of it!) with some drop lights

water - hot & cold w/ a sink

heat - gas (overhead unit)

dehumidifier

fully insulated walls and ceiling

vehicle lift - probably a 4-post lift

windows in rear of garage for ventilation

flooring - epoxy, paint, tile... what to use???

garage door - single door in front, what type to use??

any construction materials to use or avoid?

overhead hoist (for pulling engines, etc.)

shelving

stereo/tv hookup

PC hookup

refrigerator

phone

heated floor - do I want to go to the trouble?

pit - do I want this if I have a lift?

floor drain

Keep in mind that all of this will not magically appear when the garage is finished but may be added over the years as funds allow. I am mostly looking at all the things I would like to have and making sure that they are planned for during construction. I really don't want to look back and say "darn, I wish I'd..." and not be able to add it later. I just want a good solid beginning that will grow with me over the next 10-20 years. So, all you garage planners, been-there-done-that, wish-I-did-it-another-way people, tell me what you think I should do.

TIA,

Karl

'73 2002tii (in my mom's garage)

'70 1600-2 (in a rented storage garage)

'65 1800TI (hogging the 1-car garage at home)

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Guest Anonymous

Can you go higher? It's really useful to give yourself extra space above, like a 1-1/2 story building, for storage, ductwork, things that raise up when you don't need them, etc.

Second, the main concern I'd have is the basic construction. If at all possible, use steel framing instead of residential stick-built construction. This makes it much easier to add hoists, heavy duty shelving, and what have you. An extra-thick concrete slab is a good idea, and it might be nice to plan in some steel floor plates into the cement, so that you can erect fixtures and bolt things to the floor without drilling holes for lag screws.

In addition to a hoist, an overhead track system, like a steel I beam or two, would be very helpful in a space-limited environment.

Also, decide now whether you'll ever be doing much painting and sanding. If so, you'll want to plan for space for ventilation and filtration systems, and perhaps some way to erect temporary booth walls that hook up with the ventilation system.

Plan for storage of hazardous wastes. Near your sink you'll want space for a big drum or two, the type that work in conjunction with a parts washer.

Another neat idea is a permanant exhaust pipe connection that passes through the wall, so that you can run a car in your garage with the door closed.

Mike

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Guest Anonymous

With new construction, you can bury the bump in the slab...

You might integrate the lift structure into the garage. On one side.

Angle the lift in the plan to free up triangular spaces on the floor for bench, tool cabs Ect.

You might create pockets at the perimeter sized for your compressor and tool cab.

A fume ventilator next to your gas analyzer could also be flushed into pockets.

skylites? solar power - photovoltaics

Put LED's in the floor slab for uplighting.

Bulk oil dispenser.

Grease gun.

Stereo.

3d fast prototype fabricating machine.

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Guest Anonymous

Havin just built a 2 car garage I would offer the following advice.

-electrical - 110 & 220v

This goes without saying. You will always have 220 at your service so this is not "extra" it is required. Make sure you put a propoer sub panel and you can run one circuit for light ans one for plugs

-compressed air - plumbing & location for tank

Tank only takes up 2 square feet. Do you really need plumbing? Is this for extra capacity? Or convienence. the only way I would go to the trouble of plumbing it is if I had a very small compressor or I was doning painting. In that case you would want to pipe it to create water traps.

-lighting - primarily ceiling mounted fluorescent (lots of it!) with some drop lights

Cant argue with this one, just remember if you are in a colder climate without heat in the garage the fluorescent lights may become slow or inoperative

-water - hot & cold w/ a sink

Nice but not required and a pain to hook up on a detatched project. Its a garage afterall.

heat - gas (overhead unit)

If you are going with an overhead are you talking radiant or furnace if radiant remember you will need approximately an extra 2ft of headroom.

-dehumidifier

Depends where you live, if you are heating with a furnace odds are it will be bone dry.

-fully insulated walls and ceiling

Cant argue here.

-vehicle lift - probably a 4-post lift

For the average joe based on money and space this is just a pipe dream. You need at least 12 ft walls and and probably different phase wiring. If you come into a hoist at auction for $500 or $1000 then go for it but otherwise don't sweat it.

-windows in rear of garage for ventilation

Windows maybe but remember they become a point of entry.

-flooring - epoxy, paint, tile... what to use???

Expoxy or tile but while you are there why stop why not put in carpet too.

-garage door - single door in front, what type to use??

Well seing that your garage is only 15ft wide a single is your only option, not practicle in my mind but you said you were mahstrung with size.

-any construction materials to use or avoid?

Straw and mud

-overhead hoist (for pulling engines, etc.)

Are you talking about block and tackle or a shop crane, I have a folding shop crane which stores floded in the corner and takes up very little space. Also if you are serious about a hoist you will just drop your motors.

-shelving

Costco has a great deal on powder coated GORILLA RACKS which are similar to those at home depot but much sturdier, can be configured as shelves or tables. You will also need a good work bench.

-stereo/tv hookup

Stereo maybe but if you have time to watch the tube then you are not working hard enough.

-PC hookup

First off your garage will only be 15 x 30 which is 450sq ft not big for cars hoists and computers. Nice extra but so not required.

refrigerator

phone

heated floor - do I want to go to the trouble?

pit - do I want this if I have a lift?

floor drain

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Guest Anonymous

Havin just built a 2 car garage I would offer the following advice.

-electrical - 110 & 220v

This goes without saying. You will always have 220 at your service so this is not "extra" it is required. Make sure you put a propoer sub panel and you can run one circuit for light ans one for plugs

-compressed air - plumbing & location for tank

Tank only takes up 2 square feet. Do you really need plumbing? Is this for extra capacity? Or convienence. the only way I would go to the trouble of plumbing it is if I had a very small compressor or I was doning painting. In that case you would want to pipe it to create water traps.

-lighting - primarily ceiling mounted fluorescent (lots of it!) with some drop lights

Cant argue with this one, just remember if you are in a colder climate without heat in the garage the fluorescent lights may become slow or inoperative

-water - hot & cold w/ a sink

Nice but not required and a pain to hook up on a detatched project. Its a garage afterall.

heat - gas (overhead unit)

If you are going with an overhead are you talking radiant or furnace if radiant remember you will need approximately an extra 2ft of headroom.

-dehumidifier

Depends where you live, if you are heating with a furnace odds are it will be bone dry.

-fully insulated walls and ceiling

Cant argue here.

-vehicle lift - probably a 4-post lift

For the average joe based on money and space this is just a pipe dream. You need at least 12 ft walls and and probably different phase wiring. If you come into a hoist at auction for $500 or $1000 then go for it but otherwise don't sweat it.

-windows in rear of garage for ventilation

Windows maybe but remember they become a point of entry.

-flooring - epoxy, paint, tile... what to use???

Expoxy or tile but while you are there why stop why not put in carpet too.

-garage door - single door in front, what type to use??

Well seing that your garage is only 15ft wide a single is your only option, not practicle in my mind but you said you were mahstrung with size.

-any construction materials to use or avoid?

Straw and mud

-overhead hoist (for pulling engines, etc.)

Are you talking about block and tackle or a shop crane, I have a folding shop crane which stores floded in the corner and takes up very little space. Also if you are serious about a hoist you will just drop your motors.

-shelving

Costco has a great deal on powder coated GORILLA RACKS which are similar to those at home depot but much sturdier, can be configured as shelves or tables. You will also need a good work bench.

-stereo/tv hookup

Stereo maybe but if you have time to watch the tube then you are not working hard enough.

-PC hookup

First off your garage will only be 15 x 30 which is 450sq ft not big for cars hoists and computers. Nice extra but so not required.

-refrigerator

Depending on how far it is physically from your house this may be a nice necessity, once again not alot of room. Danby makes a cheap bar fridge.

-phone

My cordless works in my garage when I absolutely need to be contacted the rest of the time I want to work in peace

-heated floor - do I want to go to the trouble?

Not if you have an alternate means of heat, also you need a place to store the plumbing and well you wont have room.

-pit - do I want this if I have a lift?

Nope and they are also illegal in most areas.

-floor drain

Would be great but also illegal in most areas, some garages may have these grandfathered in but these days epa concerns prohibit them, wouldn't like antifreeze and oil getting into water supply.

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Guest Anonymous

If you're serious about a lift, you'll probably have to design the garage around it. Most importantly, it will take a MUCH taller structure, which translates into more money. You could at least plan for it and build the garage tall enough, then add the lift later when you get the funds. The floor drain might be a problem depending on where you live. Check permits/building codes before starting your design. Nix the pit, its not necessary with a lift. Skylights are cheap and its very nice to have natural lighting. A lift can be used as an engine hoist with the right "additions", so you could nix the hoist design too if you know for sure that you'll have a lift. The air compressor could probably be built on an enclosed pad outside the garage (so the neighbors hear it instead of you), which saves more garage space. Need any paint booth features?

Dan

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Guest Anonymous

that way you can drive in and out, or roll foward, and have cars

lined up in front without cluster-fucking your whole front yard.

This is isn't a big deal, and you may not have room, but it is a nice

touch.

second of all, flourescent lighting can really make your eyes bug

out, and tire real damn quick. You definately ARE going to be

working on your project(s) for sessions that are longer than you

shop at the super-market, and your eyes are the little sensitive

round things in your head that guide you and your 02, so this is

important, even though it sounds gay. Flourescent light is good

ambient light, but I wouldn't rely on it. Halogen is the easiest,

common light, on your eyes, and it's birght.

Thirdly, you want concrete floor that is sealed with POR-15.

Quintently, Delia's a woman, so have her pick out the velvet

couches, and Antique hiding-door stereo/TV cabinet. :)

Fifthly, no pit if you have a lift, and Kris H. Pimp-Dawg-G, the

mad titanium scientist in FL has an electric hoist that moves

around the ceiling (for lack of a better description) like one of

those claw games. I think that is overkill for a hobby shop. I would

rather have a hot tank/spray booth.

That covers what you mentioned...

Now, I would want a paint booth, a loft for whatever and heat.

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Guest Anonymous

hard on your feet, especially if wearing boots. I would think just adequate heating would sufice. A lot of your decisions on construction methods and materials depend on where you're located. BTW, I'm Senior Building Inspector for my jurisdiction in So. AZ

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Guest Anonymous

I've had the fortune of working in some nifty industrial facilities, and I'm always dreaming of how I will build my dream shop some day. There are a lot of good resources on the web for industrial building supplies, etc. Don't confuse my advise with that of a professional. ;->

Mike

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Guest Anonymous

I have to say I do get to deal with clients that tend to remark 'its just a garage!'

And, the typology tends to result in a typical (even costly somtimes) solution.

The architecture of the american garage (especially those built recently by the home depot type amateur - necessity driven, commercially manipulated by advertising) are an extremely interesting phenom. Your advice proves me correct but, I stray from my suggestion for your newly constructed piece of historcal lineage.

How about installing a waterless urnal?

During my forrays into the little understood 'genius loci' (or, spirit of place) of the garage, I have seen specimen examples that have amenities built in the 20's that surpass the fondest wishes of today's home uh, garage owner.

Must all that we endeviour to build always fall to the lowest denomination?

Let the cat dream a little, man!

Recently overheard at the Building Dept.

'I have been a contractor for 20 years and plans

just for getting the stinking permit.'

'Well, concrete cracks in California, thats just

the way it is...so I don't bother with all that rebar....'

I love to stand around and listen to home-depot-heads

give sage advice and call BS...

Almost as much fun as finding a flake auto mechanic...

'Well we fixed your fractulator....'

Ah yes, what is the starting budget?

Proper planning will allow phasing in of new

features as more money becomes disposable

without wasting the resource.

Hay bales do make a great building material, sometimes.

Keep an open mind...

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