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Antiseize on Brake Drums

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I just finished painting my brake drums (see photo) and have a question:  Do any of you use antiseize products on the interface between the bare metal (non-black bare metal in the photo) on brake drums and the mounting surface of rims, i.e., the point of tight contact?

 

Two BMW mechanics said to use antiseize between the stud holes on the drums (certainly well away from the studs).

Two tire company reps said they don't do so, but would rather go to the trouble of fighting to separate drums from rims if ever the two mated or rusted together in some way.  

 

Your opinions, please.  Thanks. 

 

Larry

 

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A more important place for a little anti-seize paste is the mating surface between the center hole in the drum and the upset rim on the hub.  There's enough clearance between the lug studs and drum so really solid rust there is unlikely, but the drum/hub interface is machined to pretty close tolerances.  No need to do the flat surface where the drum rests against the hub--we recently removed some drums (with the assistance of a 3 lb sledgehammer) that were frozen to the shoes (13 years unused outside) to find that surface still shiny!

 

If you have alloy wheels, it's smart to put a VERY thin coat of anti-seize paste on the interface between wheel and brake drum. Aluminum and iron fall in love and mate when exposed to moisture...

 

mike

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I do, too, and on the wheel face, and on the lug threads.

 

Which means I'm the only one who ever puts the wheels back on,

because the torque values are too high for that stuff.

 

Not really what I advocate, just what I do.

 

And if your car is dry stored, a light coat of oil is more than enough there.

 

t

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(edited)

I run steel wheels so not an issue but had a Ford Sierra Cosworth years ago that had a wheel completely freeze to the hub. Ended up using a 2"x4" and a small sledgehammer to drift it off from the other side of the car. I have always used a thin smear of Coppaslip ever since on alloys.

Edited by Simeon

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I do, too, and on the wheel face, and on the lug threads.

 

Which means I'm the only one who ever puts the wheels back on,

because the torque values are too high for that stuff.

 

Not really what I advocate, just what I do.

 

And if your car is dry stored, a light coat of oil is more than enough there.

 

t

The book torque values should be most accurate with clean lubricated threads. I too put a light smear of anti-seize on the lug threads and I use the book torques. Do you go with higher torques because of the anti-seize? 

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Mine usually come off enough that I don't worry about it. If you drive a lot in wet/salty I would. I routinely have to kick the piss out of the aluminum wheels on my chevy to get them off. Watching at the tire shop is even more fun! I've seen stuff get stuck on good! But in the end, it isn't a bad idea to do it :)

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Trick for loosening alloy wheels that are really stuck to their hubs/drums:  loosen the lug nuts A FEW TURNS ONLY and then drive a few hundred feet. SLOWLY!

 

That usually pops 'em loose.  Not too far, not too fast:  you don't want to waller (now there's a scientific term!) out the lug nut holes on the wheels.

 

mike

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Trick for loosening alloy wheels that are really stuck to their hubs/drums:  loosen the lug nuts A FEW TURNS ONLY and then drive a few hundred feet. SLOWLY!

 

 

that is definitely more humane, but not nearly as fun or satisfying as ....

 

I routinely have to kick the piss out of the aluminum wheels on my chevy to get them off.

 

:lol:  :lol:  

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lower, actually, with anti- seez.  It has much higher lubricity than dry, which seems to be what wheels are spec'd at.

 

And it's slicker than oil.  The danger seems to be over- torque with anti- seez.  I've had several stretches with it...

 

t

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Question re: use of anti-seize on brake parts well-answered and with lots of juicy details of which I was not aware, especially the brake drum hole-curved hub interface.   Many thanks to all of you.

 

Larry 

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I smear some between the hub and drum and a dab on the studs.

On the daily drivers, I use a wire brush to clean any corrosion around the hub (followed by some copper slip) and sometimes have to either kick or use a dead blow hammer to remove the wheel/tire.

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