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williamggruff

Variable Valve Timing with an M10?

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(edited)

See this article regarding Suzuki's VVT plans for their MotoGP bikes:

 

http://lanesplitter.jalopnik.com/suzukis-new-gsx-r1000-is-engineered-around-a-loophole-i-1751372078

 

I'm curious whether there would any real benefits gained from implementing a similar approach with a stock M10, or a bench-flowed, raced-out M10, and; whether it would be feasible given the valve-to-piston clearance ("squish")?

Edited by williamggruff

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You would need a twin cam to make it really work, I would think.  I don't think you would see much of anything by just retarding both lobes equally, but I haven't studied it much.

Very clever engineering though.  I like the outside the box, back to da Vinci, style engineering.  Just goes to show sometimes the easiest solutions are the hardest to think up. 

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You get a much larger change in to the performance of the engine when you change the overlap between the intake and exhaust valves.  On a single cam engine all you can do is change the timing in relation to the crankshaft but you can't change the relationship between the intake and exhaust events.  So NO this would not be worth the effort to retrofit into a M10 engine. 

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Yeah, Byron, you beat me to it-

 

I was gonna say that you'll get a lot more benefit if you stick another cam in there. 

THEN you can fuss with its timing.

 

As to race engines, they get less benefit than street engines, as (in theory)

you're running a race engine in a pretty narrow, highly optimised rev band.

 

t

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Just shows that there's nothing new under the sun...back in the dawn of the gasoline engine, many early designs used "atmospheric" intake valves.  They weren't operated by a camshaft, but were pulled open (against a weak spring) by the suction of the piston on its downward intake stroke, then slammed closed when the piston began its compression stroke.  Worked very well on those low compression 3 & 4:1 engine with really large, slow moving pistons (5-6" diameter with 1000-1500 rpm red lines).  Exhaust valves were operated by a conventional camshaft.

 

Automotive history snippet for the day.

 

mike

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Yeah, Mike, those antique engines are a marvel.

 

I'd like to see a rotary valve engine in action.

 

Would also love to see the old Willys-Knight sleeve valve engine doing it's thing.

 

Cheers!

 

Michael

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Yeah, Mike, those antique engines are a marvel.

 

I'd like to see a rotary valve engine in action.

 

 

 

Cheers!

 

Michael

 

Something like this, Michael?

 

post-42081-0-48719200-1452762965_thumb.j

 

Or like this:

 

post-42081-0-17993800-1452763064.gif

 

There should be some way to vary the timing.

 

Hen

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...and M52s have vanos....

 

t

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OMG! A friend and I were discussing over beers this weekend how a single cam could be designed to operate in the way which the Mahle cam works. Of course, we were probably drinking beers several years ago when the smart folks at Mahle were designing and developing that concept. Slicker than a greased goose fresh from the greased goose store.

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Offsets in one or both rocker shafts and then turn them to vary the fulcrum point?

Hmm

John

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