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MildSeven

2002 Soundproofing & Insulation

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(edited)

Hey Guys,
 
While looking around at stuff on CAtuned I noticed their 2002 project and some soundproofing / insulation they used behind the rear door cards.
 

It seems they used expanding foam along the top of the rocker and around the front of the wheel well. I'm not sure if this is a good idea, I figure it could trap some moisture in those areas but I also don't know best... so I'm asking you guys.

 

Thoughts?

 

LZf3clDl.jpg

 

igLWrrU.jpg

 

source: http://www.catuned.com/bfsprojects/details/10

Edited by MildSeven

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I agree, that sounds like a bad idea.

There is not a lot of sound coming from back there anyway.

 

(I could not get the links you posted to work)

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I seem to recall removing a factory installed foam piece that was jammed at the top of the  wheel arch when  deconstructed my car. I assumed that it was a sound deadener but agree the foam maybe the wrong app and the wrong location.

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(edited)

I seem to recall removing a factory installed foam piece that was jammed at the top of the wheel arch when deconstructed my car. I assumed that it was a sound deadener but agree the foam maybe the wrong app and the wrong location.

The two foam pieces, Mike, plug the two "wiring" holes between the passenger and luggage compartments. I've always viewed them more as a means of keeping gas and exhaust fumes out of the passenger compartment rather than sounds, as they are quite small and I don't view the closed luggage compartment as a big noise source. But perhaps they serve double duty.

Regards,

Steve

Edited by Conserv

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(edited)

I seem to recall removing a factory installed foam piece that was jammed at the top of the  wheel arch when  deconstructed my car. I assumed that it was a sound deadener but agree the foam maybe the wrong app and the wrong location.

 

Yes, I remember remove a gross piece of foam on each side about the wheel arches.

 

Conserv, I think we're talking about different pieces of foam because these were almost the size of a fist (when folded in half and expanded)

 

I agree, that sounds like a bad idea.

There is not a lot of sound coming from back there anyway.

 

(I could not get the links you posted to work)

 

try these:

http://i.imgur.com/LZf3clDl.jpg

 

http://i.imgur.com/igLWrrU.jpg

Edited by MildSeven

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Steve has the right idea about those two pieces of "factory" foam atop the rear wheel arches--they are to keep trunk fumes out of the passenger compartment, so unless you have a leaky rear window, I'd leave 'em in place.

 

A beneficial bit of soundproofing is to fill the space under the rear seat cushion with some kind of sound deadening.  I've seen folks use plastic bags filled with Styrofoam peanuts; I've used some hefty-sized chunks of flexible packing foam.  It really shuts out rear axle/differential noise from the passenger compartment.  

 

mike

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isn't that spray foam for insulation on windows and other large cracks in walls? i would think that it wouldn't absorb water, it should repel it. it's cheap at home depot or other hardware stores. might be worth reading the can to find out.

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(edited)

Yes, I remember remove a gross piece of foam on each side about the wheel arches.

Conserv, I think we're talking about different pieces of foam because these were almost the size of a fist (when folded in half and expanded)...

I don't know.

I removed mine last month so they don't get overspray from the re-painting project. Below are the left and right foams just before I pulled them out (they're brownish-gray and you'll have to enlarge the photos to see them). They'll go back in after the re-painting. They're currently with the painter, so I can't photograph or measure them.

Regards,

Steve

post-41123-0-19048900-1452120412_thumb.j

post-41123-0-94583900-1452120462_thumb.j

Edited by Conserv

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Yup, bad idea.  Outer panel condenses water under some conditions.

Water runs downhill, gets under foam.  Foam traps condensation,

said condensation does not evaporate, rust ensues.

 

Also, unless you really know the foam (they may) the foam itself may

promote corrosion.

 

But I sure would not do that to anything

I wasn't planning on fiberglassing, bondoing and selling off 

before the next rainy season.

 

t

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Toby is entirely correct. The problem is not the foam per se but, like most things comes down to the ability to prepare the cavity and ensure that application is perfect. The trick is to apply it so that it fully adheres to the panels and has no voids where condensation can form. This, as you can imagine is impossible in a 40+ year old box section with existing surface rust and difficulty in application to enclosed sections.

British Leyland trialled this in the 70's with Mini sills (rocker panels). The panels are not designed to be entirely watertight and so rely upon water being able to either run out through drains or evaporate and be removed through air circulation. Adding the foam is another variable to unbalance this. Result for BL? Increase in rust problems and claims on warranty.

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(edited)

I have used expanding poly-urethane foam in a closed cavity (triangular area in rear wheel well) with no problems. The trick is to avoid voids as Simeon notes. But areas such as the interior next to body panels I would worry about expansion/contraction/deformation of the panel. The application of foam in the CAtuned pic is terrible, BTW.

For sound proofing on interior panels/doors I used a spray-on sound damping (Silent Running brand with an undercoating spray gun) with excellent results.

The trunk bulkhead panel has holes about 2" in diameter on each upper side. Most models have a plastic elbow that connects these holes to an exit on each side of the trunk. Conserv's pics shows the elbows. Sunroof cars use a piece of foam to plug the hole since the elbows are not used (the oval exit hole is also plugged).

Lastly, I filled the space under the rear seats with two pieces of foam cut to fit the cavity. It has the added benefit of really firming up the support of the rear seat.

Edited by nbcbird

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i wonder if this stuff might work better. it's for water features and ponds and is designed not to absorb water. it help seal it up and keep out any water from getting in. just a thought.

 

http://www.homedepot.com/p/GREAT-STUFF-12-oz-Pond-and-Stone-Insulating-Foam-Sealant-283064/202522224?MERCH=REC-_-PIPHorizontal1_rr-_-100003351-_-202522224-_-N

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