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hootie

New to the 2002 Community: M2 Touring

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Hi all!

 

About Me:

I have been a long-time BMW lover and 2002 admirer - I actually learned to drive manual on my uncle's '74 2002. Over the years, I have owned an E36 M3, two E30s (318i and 325is stroker track rat), and an E34 M5 (still in the stable). This past Saturday, I took the plunge and officially joined the 2002 community. 

 

The Car - 1973 2002tii M2 Touring:

This car apparently has quite a bit of history behind it. It was originally built by the Einzig shop and raced in Germany before it was imported to the US. While in the US, it has been owned by two collectors in California, one of which was featured in a BMW Story video. I am super excited about the car and have already started tinkering with it.

 

IMG_3951-6_1.jpg

 

IMG_3949_1.jpg

 

IMG_3958_1.jpg

 

IMG_3953_1.jpg

 

You can find more pictures from the PO here.

 

The car isn't perfect and I've already started ordering parts (door brakes, hatch shocks, handbrake upgrade kit). The biggest issue thus far is the fuel smell in the cabin. Since the car is a touring, there is no divider to contain the smell of the fuel in the back. I've searched through numerous threads and I think I have enough direction to start investigating, but any additional help will be appreciated.

 

Excited to meet some of you guys in the Bay Area!

 

Best,

Hootie

Edited by hootie

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Nice!

 

My experience has taught me that the seals on the gas tank can get old, stiff and compressed.   The tii tank has bolts all round the sender that become loose as the seal ages.    If they are loose fuel vapors can escape and cause the smell.    That's one area you should check.    Check hoses to and from as well.    Buy OEM seals for the tank.    Aftermarket seals can be TOO soft and not torque properly.     I haven't replaced my tank's fuel gauge sender seal.    It appears dry and firm.

 

Engine bay seals on the hood and firewall can also play a role in limiting fuel smell from the engine.    Make sure all are in good shape. 

 

Not sure of the venting for the tank in the Touring.  Others will have more useful information.

 

Enjoy that cool car!

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Hi Hootie!

Glad to see you joined the FAQ! Allot of great info here for you.

The car looks fantastic in the pics. I'm sure you obeyed the speed laws on the at back up north!

Keep in touch. It's always nice to see new enthusiasts join the club!!

Rey

Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

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Hi Hootie!

Glad to see you joined the FAQ! Allot of great info here for you.

The car looks fantastic in the pics. I'm sure you obeyed the speed laws on the at back up north!

Keep in touch. It's always nice to see new enthusiasts join the club!!

Rey

Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

 

Hey Rey! I may have gone a bit faster during the flat clear portions of I5... :) . Got some great looks along the way too!

 

Nice!

 

My experience has taught me that the seals on the gas tank can get old, stiff and compressed.   The tii tank has bolts all round the sender that become loose as the seal ages.    If they are loose fuel vapors can escape and cause the smell.    That's one area you should check.    Check hoses to and from as well.    Buy OEM seals for the tank.    Aftermarket seals can be TOO soft and not torque properly.     I haven't replaced my tank's fuel gauge sender seal.    It appears dry and firm.

 

Engine bay seals on the hood and firewall can also play a role in limiting fuel smell from the engine.    Make sure all are in good shape. 

 

Not sure of the venting for the tank in the Touring.  Others will have more useful information.

 

Enjoy that cool car!

 

Thanks for the tips. I'm going to begin checking it out this weekend and searching for a culprit. Also, what is the easiest place to get new seals, filler boots, etc.? Stealership or online?

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Thanks for the tips. I'm going to begin checking it out this weekend and searching for a culprit. Also, what is the easiest place to get new seals, filler boots, etc.? Stealership or online?

 

Some parts are best purchased from the dealer.  Example: seals. 

Blunttech.com (steve) has access to most everything you'd need, OEM and aftermarket.

WallothNesch.com (Germany) has good parts, shipping, price, but beware of some aftermarket parts that don't always fit or last.

Edited by PaulTWinterton

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I have an m2 touring too (try saying that after a few) and had similar issues. As well as what Paul said (new rubber everything is the only way to ensure it doesn't leak fumes) in stock form the tank vents to a hole in the middle-back of the boot floor. A rubber grommet should seal this, if it's even present. And even if it is a dodgy seal between tank and boot floor could draw the smell back in. 

 

Also check the filler hose isn't crazed and cracked and all joints tighter than a ducks arse. 

 

Here's your car on my site - if you want to update info and pics send them to me: nick vyse at yahoo com

 

http://www.m2bmw.com/touring.htm

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Some parts are best purchased from the dealer.  Example: seals. 

Blunttech.com (steve) has access to most everything you'd need, OEM and aftermarket.

WallothNesch.com (Germany) has good parts, shipping, price, but beware of some aftermarket parts that don't always fit or last.

I've been talking to Steve from Blunttech who has been extremely helpful. I ordered a filler boot and new fuel return line.

 

I have an m2 touring too (try saying that after a few) and had similar issues. As well as what Paul said (new rubber everything is the only way to ensure it doesn't leak fumes) in stock form the tank vents to a hole in the middle-back of the boot floor. A rubber grommet should seal this, if it's even present. And even if it is a dodgy seal between tank and boot floor could draw the smell back in. 

 

Also check the filler hose isn't crazed and cracked and all joints tighter than a ducks arse. 

 

Here's your car on my site - if you want to update info and pics send them to me: nick vyse at yahoo com

 

http://www.m2bmw.com/touring.htm

A little backstory - when I filled the car up for the first time, I didn't know about the filling quirks. I ended up filling the fuel tank all the way to the brim (literally - I could see the fuel level in the filler boot). I said to myself - this can't be good.

 

Last night, I took a look to see if I could find anything. After removing the CF cover for the fuel tank, I found a lot of fuel marks around the feed and return line hoses (see below). I think this was due to me over filling the tank before.

IMG_3966.jpg

 

IMG_3972.jpg

 

I then saw some little cracks in the filler boot on the bottom and up the ridge (see below).

IMG_3968.jpg

 

IMG_3970.jpg

 

IMG_3971.jpg

 

I then decided to remove the boot to cover it in some gorilla tape, while the new boot is shipping here. When I removed the boot, I found a weird sealant (almost like silicone) over the paper seal. Has anyone seen something like this? Should I be applying this when I put the new boot on?

IMG_3978.jpg

 

IMG_3979.jpg

 

IMG_3977.jpg

 

IMG_3976.jpg

 

After wrapping the boot with tape and putting it back together, the car smells much less like fuel. I didn't see any marks of fuel near the filter/pump/hoses. It was bone dry everywhere else. I really think this is a combination of the filler boot cracks and the overfilling, but wanted to get your guys' thoughts.

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Yep, it'll be the seal between the fuel pick up and or the fuel level sender unit. Bit of fast driving, sloshing an almost full tank about and the weeping will be back. 

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That sealant was not compatible with fuel.  Find something better if you intend to seal in addition to the gasket.

The tank pickup flange has been severely overtightened as evidenced by the dents at each bolt head location.  Try to reform to it is flat or the new gasket will just pinch around the bolt locations and possibly split.  The fuel stain is evidence that the pickup flange gasket is not holding now.

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Yep, it'll be the seal between the fuel pick up and or the fuel level sender unit. Bit of fast driving, sloshing an almost full tank about and the weeping will be back. 

I had a spirited drive to work (didn't take much to convince me), and the tank was bone dry on top. I think this was only caused by drastic overfilling.

 

That sealant was not compatible with fuel.  Find something better if you intend to seal in addition to the gasket.

The tank pickup flange has been severely overtightened as evidenced by the dents at each bolt head location.  Try to reform to it is flat or the new gasket will just pinch around the bolt locations and possibly split.  The fuel stain is evidence that the pickup flange gasket is not holding now.

I had a spirited drive to work (didn't take much to convince me), and the tank was bone dry on top. I think this was only caused by drastic overfilling.

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Following up here, the fuel smell is still here and might even be getting worse. I flattened out the tank pickup flange tonight while waiting on a new tank seal.

 

Once the new seal gets in, I'll swap that in along with a new feed return hose and report back.

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I swapped in the new tank pickup flange seal last night, but when I went out to the car this morning, I still smelled fuel inside?! I don't get it.

 

I used my nose to sniff around the trunk (at the expense of brain cells), and it seemed like the smell was coming from where the filler boot connects to the body. I'm going to remove the filler boot again and re-install to make sure everything is secure. Has anyone applied gas resistant sealant to where the filler boot connects to the body? Any other ideas?!

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