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Where to get a brush for cleaning engine block oil passages?


Guest Anonymous

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Guest Anonymous

Not that I own one but, you can find a gun store and find a barrel cleaning brush. Apparently they come in different sizes are solvent friendly and not that expensive. Perhaps walmart would have one? I dunno, I go over and steal my friends industrial solvent tank in his garage when I need it.

-Bernard

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Guest Anonymous

URL: http://catalog.jlindustrial.com/jlindustrial/circular_browse_page_large.asp?StoreID=2396116&Rapid=33440&BPM=1&DisplayPageNumber=1460&&&PromotionPageID=97062

Check the link, it's from an industrial supply catalog. In the bottom left corner of the page there are some sizes shown. You can find longer ones from other suppliers.

When you take a block to a shop, they will clean it prior to machine work (mostly to protect their equipment & machine coolant). After the machining, it needs to be cleaned more completely before assembly.

I use nylon brushes and Tide detergent for cleaning oil galleries in the block. Tide powder is specifically recommended by some car's factory service manuals. It works great on cast iron & aluminum.

While solvents like brake clean are great for cutting grease & dissolving crud, they do not leave a surface clean. Brake clean & many other solvents flash off too quickly to actually remove all the contaminants; they loosen the stuff & move it around. Lots of stuff may leave the surface with a wash of brake clean, but you can easily see what's left behind. Detergents do a much better job of incorporating dirt and carrying it away. For a final clean on honed cylinder bores, after the detergent wash has been rinsed & dried, use ATF on a Bounty paper towel to lift the last bit of crap out of the honed finish.

Brass bristle brushes transfer too much material to be used inside an engine. You can see the yellow metal on the cast iron after using them. Steel wire brushes also transfer material, albeit at a lesser rate (you can see the steel brush's transfered material turn to orange rust on the surface.) Stainless steel brushes are a much better option. Stock up on the brushes when they go on sale at Enco, J&L, MSC or your local favorite.

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Guest Anonymous

Even after hot tanking you should brush out all the passages you'll be suprised how much crap you'll get out of a clean block. I've washed casting sand out of a twice hot tanked and presure washed 20 year old blocks water passages.....Marty...

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Guest Anonymous

and white paper towels or 100% cotton rags until you can scrub the entire bore with 1 towel and have no discoloration at all, this should take 10-15 minutes per bore. Overkill maybe but you only get one chance to clean them and the better they seal the faster you go.....Marty....

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