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WOT: want recommendations/views on tablesaws


Guest Anonymous

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Guest Anonymous

looking for floor type contractor size (medium) not small portable type or big/expensive cabinet saw (although a guy can wish).

If you have one, what is it, do you like it? What would you buy etc.

I know there are some wood heads out there...

TIA,

B

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Guest Anonymous

there is alot to be said for the weight, power, and smoothness of the cabinet saws. I had access to one while in school, and have a lowly craftsman contractor grade saw now.

Two complaints jump out. One is a lack of power and difficulty squaring it (god forbid you want to change the angle, it doesn't want to go back to where it was originally set). The table top was pretty straight, some are not though. The other thing was the power and vibration. Vibration has somewhat to do with weight and rigidity of the stand. The crappy sheet metal stand is not good at handling the vibration. The vibration from the motor can somewhat be alleviated with one of those funky red segmented drive belts (they do work). For power all I can say is it ain't no 5 hp ;P.

The last item, which I should have paid for upfront, was a good fence. In about 3 weeks of ownership I had upgraded to a full sheet of plywood for the support table and added a 52" beisemeyer fence. My point is be realistic about what you are going to be cutting. If you are going to be doing work with full sheets, I bet you will be miserable with a small fence and table. If you don't care about waste, and don't mind roughing sheets with a circular saw, still look at the fence as a priority.

hth david

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Guest Anonymous

Same comments as dhs. Size makes a difference when you're working with full sheets and the small contractor size doesn't compare with a cabinet saw. That said, mine does what it is supposed to.

It's a low end Delta (paid about $300-400 a few years back) - 10". Typical of Delta stuff, it's not very feature rich, but there's also not a lot of plastic on it (that's good in my book). Small table is a pain. The legs are flimsy. The gate system isn't as confidence inspiring as some of the others out there. I find myself checking and re-checking it's square when I've clamped it down. However, it's has been good enough for what I've been doining each time, so I guess it works. Although the motor is direct drive, it'll zip through most hardwoods of reasonable thickness.

In sum, you get what you pay for. I wouldn't build fine furniture on this Delta, but it's decent. Size and the gate are my two biggest complaints. I've used it to build cabinets, rip 3/4" ply wood for sub floors, and some misc framing work (I normally use a my power miter for this) and all turned out good.

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Guest Anonymous

URL: http://www.grizzly.com/products/item.cfm?itemnumber=G1022PROZX

Was initially thinking of the Grizzly 1022pro model.

and make a couple outfeed/roller tables for it so it'd ease full sheet use. It's an import (aren't they all?) and from Grizzly out of MO. Seems to have a lot of features for the $.

I've used saws ranging from cheapassed benchtops to industrial school (drool) saws and this is going to be my first (prob. last) table saw purchase.

I'd appriciate any thoughts/opinions on this particular saw.

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Guest Anonymous

A lot of schools are shutting down there shops due to high insurance costs and lack of interest in old tech schooling. You can find some very nice low hour hi end shop equipment for pennys on the dollar.....Marty....

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