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Tii clock Repair?

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Guest Anonymous

Anybody had any luck trying to repair a tii clock themselves? TIA

Tim

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Guest Anonymous

by cleaning the contacts inside the clock, search it.

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Guest Anonymous

Has done it...not sure what year but I saw his instructions on his site

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Guest Anonymous

Thanks, I'll check it out

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Guest Anonymous

dang, '73. Oh well I'll try anyway. Thanks

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Guest Anonymous

inside the clock with some sandpaper and it should work again.

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Guest Anonymous

Ah yes, "pre" meaning before, duly noted.

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Guest Anonymous

I used a small flat screwdriver and gently pried up the bezel. Only need to go around halfway as it should then slide off. I cleaned the contacts and then applied 12v to test. When the contacts touch(as the clock winds down), the unit should fire and spring out. This is what winds the clock.

Mine would run for a while and then just stop before the contacts would touch and fire. Asz the problem was purely mechanical, I tried a couple of clock shops. Nobody wanted to try it, not worth their time. (BAD pun)

I went ahead and used isopropyl alc to clean all the pivot points and any dirt I could see on the gears. Better, but not done. I then applied just a drop of light oil on one pivot point at a time. After about 3 or 4 I had it working. I let it run open on the bench before I buttoned it up. Working now, but I just need to adjust the speed. Oh yes, and find one of the mounting brackets. The PO used duct tape to hold it in place!

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Guest Anonymous

Thats great, sounds like just the sort of story I was hoping for. I'll give it a shot

Thanks, Tim

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Guest Anonymous

I used a small flat blade screwdriver and worked up the edge

of the bezel that wraps around the lip of the canister. (You

can't

see the lip until you have the thing apart, but it's there.) Once

you have a start, it's just a matter of working the screwdriver

blade

gradually around the circumferance of the bezel edge prying

a little more each time around...it's slow work and you CAN

screw

up the bezel if you "ham-hand" it, I thought of it as "stretching"

the metal. Also, you will need to reverse the prying up when

you

reassemble, so consider that, too. I made a pad of corrugated

cardboard (ordinary box board) with a hole punched in for

the

center knob of the clock face, to work on. If you don't savor

the challenge of this, there is always the option of spending $

and

letting Palo Alto Speedo or No. Hollywood Speedo do the job

for you.

I took mine apart and fixed the broken solder joint that was

the prob...they are sealed, but the work-around is to gently

and

carefully pry the chrome bezel up all around the front until

you can separate the front from the "can"(thanks to advice

from this

board!). Mine is an old mechanical MotoMeter clock, but the

later ones look mostly the same. Palo Alto Speedometer will

rebuild these for $125 and up...I opted to save some $$ and

DIY. I have seen later clocks salvaged from late BMWs

offered for

sale, these are cheap ($40) but I believe smaller

diameter...however, you could MAYBE adapt one to fit the

larger hole with a

sleeve.

Lee,

I just did this several weeks ago and spent a lot of time

researching it.

I'm assuming you know that you can get the clock out through

the glove box WITHOUT removing the dash board (see the

archives, or reach around in there).

I used N. Hollywood Speedo and would recommend them.

They were able to transfer the original face from my

non-functioning clock to a new VDO quartz clock while I

waited, after I just walked in. They only charged me for the

new

clock (no labor), which was $150.- plus tax. CNPR wants

$175 for a quartz clock that doesn't look right). The VDO

clock with

my original clock's face fit right, looks perfect, and the

electrical connections were similar enough that even I could

figure it

out. Re-installing the clock in the dash is a PITA, but not

impossible.

Good luck,

Ben '74 tii

'98 CBR F3

Per Mike's book, page 156:

"Reparing a clock can be very simple, the hardest part being

taking it out of the dash. By removing some of the under-dash

panels, you can slip your hand up behind the clock and

unscrew the two knurled nuts that hold it to the bracket.

With the clock out of the dash, take the rear cover off by

undioing the small screws that hold it on. You should now

see the

mechanism, and if you look carefully you can find where the

circuit has broken. There is a point in the circuit where two

small

metal discs are, or should be, attached to each other (this

was probably intended as a safety circuit-breaker).

The discs can come apart and break the circuit that

energized the electromagnet to bring the arm up from the

bottom of its

cycle. You can check to see if this is the problem by attaching

the clock to a 12 vold DC source and using a small

screwdriver

to push the discs together. The arm should fly up to the top

and the clock will start ticking again. The repair is simply to

solder

the two discs back together."

: Thanks. This car was purchased new in Belgium, and I'm

glad to learn that the clock is probably original - now if I could

only get it to work!

The clock indeed is the most common option on european

02:s. Ive looked at four nonworking VDO original clocks and

they

have all had the same problem( very easy to fix!!!) The clock

is electro-mechanical, that is there is a mechanism for

"winding" the clock up, after that it runs for about five minutes

driven by a spring. When the tension in the spring is used up,

the arm touches an electrical contact and the spring is wound

up again. The culprit is (at least sofar in 4 out of 4 cases) this

electrical contact. There is a part made of spring steel that

should attach to the electrical contact- and this has most

often

rattled loose. If you solder this piece back together the clock

should work okay. To get to this part you obviosly have to

remove

the clock from the instrument cluster and open the small nuts

on the back of the clock (one of them is sealed, no warranty

after that :-) )

Hope this helps!

Benkku

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Guest Anonymous

IT HAS NOT MISSED A MINUTE IN TWO YEARS

BUT IT SOUNDS DIFFERENT .

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