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Sealant under rear quarter window trim?


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I'm about to refasten the trim that sits at the bottom of the rear quarter windows before replacing the window gasket. When I took them out to paint, the rivets that are intended to hold them in place had pretty much corroded away and weren't doing anything.

 

I'm going to replace the rivets with some stainless steel machine screws/nyloc nuts, but the real question is whether I should put any sort of caulking or sealant between the chrome (really aluminum) trim and the body to reduce any seepage of water under the trim. It doesn't look there was anything there before, but it was so dirty (plus some surface rust), its hard to tell.  

 

I'm inclined to throw in a little silicon bead, but wasn't sure if it would hold up....

 

Thoughts?

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When reinstalling the this specific trim on my car this fall after paint, I used stainless rivets thru the body to hold the trim in place.  Between the body I used a strip of dum dum caulk.  This is the black tar like stuff that A/C installers use to insulate A/C componets and to seal holes.  Remember that dissimiliar metals have a tendency to react with each other causing corrosion hence my using steel rivits versus aluminum realizing the rivit would react with the aluminum of the trim, hopefully the body would not be sacrificed.

Earl

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Thanks guys. I've got some butyl strip material that I'll try. My concern was what Emyers was stating, that with dissimilar metals, even a little water would eventually promote galvanic corrosion. I think the interaction between the aluminum rivets and the steel of the body may have been what caused them to dissolve (and why I was going with the stainless fasteners).

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i used rubberized caulk primarily to seal up the gap between the aluminum trim and body, thinking it would displace water and prevent condensation.  i used enough to fill any gap/cavity under the trim piece.  corrosion requires an electrolyte to proceed so the best defense is to keep those rivets encased in waterproof environment if you are concerned with electrolysis. 

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+1 to what Jerry said above.  I would also caution against using stainless steel fasteners in this particular application. You can find various charts online that show the galvanic action between dissimilar metals, and SS can tend to be the worst "companion" with aluminum (and regular steel).  

 

galvanicchart.gif

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