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Why is the shifter support plate C-shaped?


Healey3000

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Hi,

 

From the photographs I've found through searching the forum, it looks like there is nothing in the trans tunnel that might interfere with the support plate.  Why then is it C-shaped, as if to clear something?

 

It's a curious design indeed, very non-German, like something that was cobbled together at the last minute.  All that nice die-cast aluminum and then, this?

 

Thanks for any insights.

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Are you talking about the horseshoe shape bracket the bolts to the tunnel that holds the trans mount that is sometimes used in the 5 speed install? If so, it is used so the installer does not have to cut off and move the bracket mounts that it attaches to. It is aftermarket and BMW does not use that bracket.

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Are you talking about the horseshoe shape bracket the bolts to the tunnel that holds the trans mount that is sometimes used in the 5 speed install? If so, it is used so the installer does not have to cut off and move the bracket mounts that it attaches to. It is aftermarket and BMW does not use that bracket.

That's the only "C"-shaped plate I can think of either. If that's not what you're referring to, Healey3000, why not post a photo?

Regards,

Steve

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If you mean the actual shifter plate itself (that attaches with the support blocks to the rear of the tranny and holds the shift lever), that is an interesting question. The early ones were sort of C-shaped, but the later 320i variants were a tapered design (wider at the front) and tapering to the rear where the shifter tower sits). It is kind of a weird design, but it allows the plate to be fully floating and supported by the lower arm rather than attached to a bracket at the back that bolts to the tranny tunnel.

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Hi,

 

I'm referring to the plate that the gearshift sits in (supports the pivot ball of the shift lever).  Perhaps C-shaped was a bit of an exaggeration, but it has a large bite taken out of one side.  It's component 8 in this drawing I found in another post.

 

post-48304-0-30312700-1425483529_thumb.j

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The shift "tower" is curved to clear the flex disk (guibo) along with the shift rod and coupling.  The boxed section adds strength. Ingenious design IMO.

I understand that aspect but why didn't they just make it symmetrical, having two box sections going full length, with a window cut out to clear the guibo?  Would have made it more stable (but there's always a reason and I'm curious).

Oh, THAT "C"-shaped piece!

Are you having an issue with the component or are you simply wishing it were more...robust! I've never come across a problem related to its "C" shape, but perhaps others have.

Regards,

Steve

I'm going to embark on a 5-speed conversion and I just wanted to understand what my options were for modifying the support plate distance.

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Oh, and technically, that drawing shows the early style support with the late, "single shear" linkage.

If that was ever used, it was used for a short time in 1973...

 

If you use a support of that style, then an early shift linkage and lever's a LOT better for feel and for wear.

 

imho, of course

 

t

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Oh, and technically, that drawing shows the early style support with the late, "single shear" linkage.

If that was ever used, it was used for a short time in 1973...

 

If you use a support of that style, then an early shift linkage and lever's a LOT better for feel and for wear.

 

imho, of course

 

t

Can you educate me on late vs. old?  Is the difference that one has a straight clevis pin connecting the shifter to the selector and the other has an offset link like the one in the diagram above?  Which is better?

 

Thanks.

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