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Questions about my coil pack.....


pisgahlvr

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Hey all,

 
I have a 76 base model 4spd with a vacuum advance/retard distributor. I recently acquired a Bosch 008 mechanical advance dizzy with a pertronix already installed. I am in the midst of replacing my dizzy with the 008 dizzy and I'm confused about coil packs. Based on the pictures below can anyone tell me if I have an internal ballast? If not, can you tell me where exactly I would need to place my test leads in order to measure the resistance of the coil pack? When running the pertronix wiring, should I just connect the positive and negative wires to the corresponding terminals on the coil pack?
 
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That is a good old Bosch Black Coil, with no internal resistor.  The resistor in your seventy-six is a wire, as opposed to the ceramic ballast type resistors in earlier cars.  The wire that has clear (yellowish) insulation is the resistor.  

 

You want to take the power for the Pertronix from just before the splice that connects the resistor wire to the green wire.  It is hidden in the blue sheath just behind the distributor and you can roll back that cover to expose it.  You then run a black (neg) wire between the pertronix and the coil.  Do it in such a way that you can just unplug the Pertronix and switch back to points.  The leads on the Pertronix were longer than I needed, so I cut them off and used them to splice into the harness and then added new connectors to the shortened wires.  (You can see that the original condenser wire is still coming out of the harness in the last photo).

 

051.jpg

 

059.jpg

 

060.jpg

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That is a good old Bosch Black Coil, with no internal resistor.  The resistor in your seventy-six is a wire, as opposed to the ceramic ballast type resistors in earlier cars.  The wire that has clear (yellowish) insulation is the resistor.  

 

You want to take the power for the Pertronix from just before the splice that connects the resistor wire to the green wire.  It is hidden in the blue sheath just behind the distributor and you can roll back that cover to expose it.  You then run a black (neg) wire between the pertronix and the coil.  Do it in such a way that you can just unplug the Pertronix and switch back to points.  The leads on the Pertronix were longer than I needed, so I cut them off and used them to splice into the harness and then added new connectors to the shortened wires.  (You can see that the original condenser wire is still coming out of the harness in the last photo).

 

051.jpg

 

059.jpg

 

060.jpg

 

Ok, so is there a coil pack on the market that I can purchase that already has the proper resister installed inside it? Would be nice and convenient to have an all in one package. 

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The Bosch Blue coil has an internal resistor.  The blue coil would clean up the look, if you had a ceramic resistor you did not want to look at.  It might be more convenient if you did not already have the resistor wire and had to add resistance to what you have; but having to order a new coil seems like more of a hassle than using what you already have.  

 

Note that if you buy a blue coil it might be aluminum housing, as opposed to blue.  The new black coils are that way.  I understad the appeal of NEW parts, but I have a new black (aluminum) coil I bought and took back out, in favor of the original one that came with the car.  Note that the coil you have says MADE IN GERMANY.  The new one will not say that.

 

It is a very easy installation to put a Pertronix unit in.  I stripped the plastic off the outside of a crimp connector and used that to graft the red wire to the green one, before wrapping it with tape and the blue sheath.  (You can see it sitting on the strippers in the first photo above).

 

Here is the factory splice you are looking for (cloth tape)

 

 048.jpg

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The Bosch Blue coil has an internal resistor.  The blue coil would clean up the look, if you had a ceramic resistor you did not want to look at.  It might be more convenient if you did not already have the resistor wire and had to add resistance to what you have; but having to order a new coil seems like more of a hassle than using what you already have.  

 

Note that if you buy a blue coil it might be aluminum housing, as opposed to blue.  The new black coils are that way.  I understad the appeal of NEW parts, but I have a new black (aluminum) coil I bought and took back out, in favor of the original one that came with the car.  Note that the coil you have says MADE IN GERMANY.  The new one will not say that.

 

It is a very easy installation to put a Pertronix unit in.  I stripped the plastic off the outside of a crimp connector and used that to graft the red wire to the green one, before wrapping it with tape and the blue sheath.  (You can see it sitting on the strippers in the first photo above).

 

Here is the factory splice you are looking for (cloth tape)

 

 048.jpg

 

Did you solder the wire? Or use some sort of T-splice? 

 

*edit* My apologies, I went back and re-read your last post. You used a crimp connector to attach the red wire to the green wire. Got it. Thank you very much. It seems very straight forward. Did you just run a whole new section of black wire for the negative terminal on the coil? 

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Yes, but because I cut the Pertronix wires off and used them to come off the harness, I crimped a new section of black wire to the one I cut off and used heat shrink tubing over the connection.  You can see that in the second photo I posted above.  The black wire was run inside the factory blue sheath.  I like that stuff.  It must be silicone, as it is still nice and soft after all these years.  

 

Using the insulated connectors to come off the harness makes it so you can unplug and go back to points and let them dangle there without grounding.  If your distributor has a Pertronix-like module (knock-off brand) inside, you may not have the problem of extra wire length to deal with... so I have read.

 

As a side note:

 

I had an #002 distributor in my car when I bought it.  I called Pertronix to determine which unit to buy and put that one in.  Apparently the alignment to the points plate is not perfect with that unit and I was seeing funny arc marks on the cap.  (something to watch for)

013.jpg

 

I inquired here and got helpful information from Preyuppy and others about why this was happening.  In the end I switched back to a vacuum advance #164 distributor (#002 was sloppy) and points.  It is all a learning experience and fun to try different set ups.  If you have an original vacuum distributor which you are replacing, hold onto it.  You may decide to send it in to Advanced Distributors for a rebuild.  People here have been very happy with that service.

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Yes, but because I cut the Pertronix wires off and used them to come off the harness, I crimped a new section of black wire to the one I cut off and used heat shrink tubing over the connection.  You can see that in the second photo I posted above.  The black wire was run inside the factory blue sheath.  I like that stuff.  It must be silicone, as it is still nice and soft after all these years.  

 

Using the insulated connectors to come off the harness makes it so you can unplug and go back to points and let them dangle there without grounding.  If your distributor has a Pertronix-like module (knock-off brand) inside, you may not have the problem of extra wire length to deal with... so I have read.

 

As a side note:

 

I had an #002 distributor in my car when I bought it.  I called Pertronix to determine which unit to buy and put that one in.  Apparently the alignment to the points plate is not perfect with that unit and I was seeing funny arc marks on the cap.  (something to watch for)

013.jpg

 

I inquired here and got helpful information from Preyuppy and others about why this was happening.  In the end I switched back to a vacuum advance #164 distributor (#002 was sloppy) and points.  It is all a learning experience and fun to try different set ups.  If you have an original vacuum distributor which you are replacing, hold onto it.  You may decide to send it in to Advanced Distributors for a rebuild.  People here have been very happy with that service.

 

I am replacing a vacuum advance/retard distributor. Apparently it is the one that nobody likes. :) I found an 008 original bosch mechanical advance distributor with a pertronix already installed so that is what I am converting over to. I will keep an eye out for the arcing though. Did you find that your car runs better with the pertronix installed? My car runs like crap after it finishes warming up (have a 32/36 weber with a water choke installed). Korman is sending me a brand new, properly jetted and configured 32/36 with an electric choke. I'm pairing that with this 008 distributor and pertronix. Just trying to get a setup that is reliable and that will run properly. 

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...Did you find that your car runs better with the pertronix installed?...

I run a Pertronix unit in my '76. I don't believe it makes any difference in the way the car runs, nor did I ever expect it to make a difference. To me, it solely means not having to replace and periodically re-set points.

Other opinions may differ!

Regards,

Steve

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I run a Pertronix unit in my '76. I don't believe it makes any difference in the way the car runs, nor did I ever expect it to make a difference. To me, it solely means not having to replace and periodically re-set points.

Other opinions may differ!

Regards,

Steve

 

I think anything will be a nice improvement over how my car is currently running. Whenever I give it gas it just dies! And it seriously idles like shit. 

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I think anything will be a nice improvement over how my car is currently running. Whenever I give it gas it just dies! And it seriously idles like shit.

I believe you need: (1.) a carb overhaul -- the new carb from Korman will address that need; and (2.) the car set up (tuned) properly afterward by someone who knows 2002s.

Good luck,

Steve

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 Thought I would update this thread with what I ended up doing to get my 008 dizzy installed. AutoZone had these splices that crimp onto an existing wire, and then allow you to splice in a wire to that circuit, sort of like a T-tap, but slightly different. They also have dielectric grease in the connections for weather proofing. So I crimped the hot wire from the distributor onto the green wire just before the resistor wire that you posted about above. For the negative wire, I simply added a blade connector onto the distributor negative wire, and connected it to the OEM connector attached to the negative wire that connected to the condensor on the old distributor and that runs out to the coil pack. Simple and clean, and I didn't have to run any extra wire.  :) Started right up on the first try. Korman is sending me a new carburettor this week, so hopefully that will fix the problem of the engine dying. 

 

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