Jump to content
Chris Parent

Flaring brake lines

24 posts / 2234 viewsLast Reply

Recommended Posts

Hi everyone, I'm about to pull my hair out trying to flare my own lines. Yes yes I can be some steel line at auto zone or wherever and try to make that work - which I did for the rears. But for the fronts, finding longer lines is a bit of a challenge. So I bought an OTC 4504 bubble flaring kit (hey everyone on Amazon said it worked for them) and some copper nickel line. Every SEVERAL attempts making several different adjustments I keep getting very similar results. Isn't that almost the definition of insanity?

 

Let's start with what I'm doing. Cut the tube square. Deburr. Chamfer the outside edge. Use WD-40 to lube up the flare tool. Made sure the correct amount of tube protrudes from the flaring bar. Etc etc etc.

 

The bubble has a nice groove in it. I can't figure out why this is happening. I checked and cleaned out the flare adapter. Could the copper nickel be too soft? Ain't like it could be operator error :)

 

Here's what I get:

 

post-45427-0-92927900-1417753146_thumb.j

post-45427-0-59578500-1417753159_thumb.j

post-45427-0-08396300-1417753186_thumb.j

 

 

Any advice on what I'm doing wrong would be greatly appreciated. 

 

Thank you

-C

post-45427-0-97819900-1417753174_thumb.j

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I don't know what you are doing wrong. Maybe that tool is just designed for steel lines. Make sure you are using the right die. Makes me glad I bought a prebent set form AndrewAce.

 

post-41415-0-37738200-1417757411.jpg

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I was thinking the same about mild steel lines.

 

I have to say, I tried a LOT of different ways to get bubble flares, and decided that I was not capable of doing it.

 

t

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I don't know what you are doing wrong. Maybe that tool is just designed for steel lines. Make sure you are using the right die. Makes me glad I bought a prebent set form AndrewAce.

 

attachicon.gifpost-41415-0-56893800-1417752910_thumb.jpg

 

 

I'm acquainted with Andrew and actually solicited him to make me an entire set a few months ago, but he's been extremely busy with school and work. I pestered him enough :)   Perhaps I'll reach back out to him.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Not sure what you are doing wrong, I do flares regularly using an auto zone tool.

That said, you can just buy the right length brake line from any bmw dealer, and it is not expensive. Just have to bend it yourself. Saves all the flaring hassle.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If you go with Andrew, plan ahead. Don't expect them next week as they are made to order and made as he has time. I just got mine a couple of days ago and they look great. I was going to make my own lines but after receiving these and seeing all the work involved, I glad I had someone else make them. The basic kit contains 12 lines, that is 24 flares and countless bends.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I used a flaring tool on OEM BMW lines and the only problem I had was the bar slipping on the brake line while tightening clamp--make sure the line doesn't move. So what would the difference be in flaring tools to accommodate different alloys?  You said that you indexed the protrusion of the line correctly on the bar--about 6mm?  Maybe a small amount of grease on the adapter to avoid any binding or possibly adjusting the amount of protrusion a little? Good luck.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I used a flaring tool on OEM BMW lines and the only problem I had was the bar slipping on the brake line while tightening clamp--make sure the line doesn't move. So what would the difference be in flaring tools to accommodate different alloys?  You said that you indexed the protrusion of the line correctly on the bar--about 6mm?  Maybe a small amount of grease on the adapter to avoid any binding or possibly adjusting the amount of protrusion a little? Good luck.

 

Line is definitely not slipping, and yes, the protrusion is accurate. I am greasing the adapter. I'm not encountering any binding. I have tried playing with the amount of protrusion will no success. Grrrr..

 

The auto parts stores near me don't have any bubble flaring tools unfortunately. Bah. If I can't get a hold of Andrew I'll probably end up ordering some from the dealer. The copper nickel material is nice though, real easy to shape. It's a shame.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I used a flaring tool on OEM BMW lines and the only problem I had was the bar slipping on the brake line while tightening clamp--make sure the line doesn't move. 

 

I thought that the OEM BMW brake lines came already flared?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
(edited)

BMW lines are flared but some have been superceded and are not the correct length.  I suggest measuring original line and choosing closest length from brake line listing--particularly when doing the big brake upgrade.

 

Chrisracer--is the flare possibly overtightened, causing it to deform?  Maybe the nickel/cooper is too soft as mentioned.

Edited by nbcbird

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Had the same problem you're having.  Tried my best for many hours (and many feet of tubing) before I broke down and spent the big bucks on Eastwood's tool.  It works perfectly every time with copper-nickel and steel tubing.  Haven't tried it with stainless yet. 

The only drawback to this tool is that it has to be clamped in a vise.  You can't use it on the car.

 

http://www.eastwood.com/professional-brake-tubing-flaring-tool.html

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.




×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.