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Snapped rear lower strut mount - Help requested


pompei426

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Yep, I messed up. I'm not even entirely sure how it happened, but when I went to loosen the nut with my breaker bar, I heard a snap and knew I was in trouble. I don't know what to replace it with (where to get the part), or even how to replace it. Does anyone have any knowledge on the matter? I've attached a photo so you can visualize my misfortune and stupidity. 

 
 

post-45552-0-16794200-1416978116_thumb.j

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Driving out the old  bolt may be easier if bit of heat is applied to the broken stud where it goes thru the mounting point (taking care not to torch any organic pieces like the emergency brake parts).  Also, if you go with the "bolt thru the hole, nut and lockwasher" route, be sure to use a grade 8 or higher bolt. while it doesn't appear these parts need to be tough, they really take a beating.  Although more involved, I'd seriously recommend replacing with the correct part, you'll sleep better.

 

GH

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Driving out the old  bolt may be easier if bit of heat is applied to the broken stud where it goes thru the mounting point (taking care not to torch any organic pieces like the emergency brake parts).  Also, if you go with the "bolt thru the hole, nut and lockwasher" route, be sure to use a grade 8 or higher bolt. while it doesn't appear these parts need to be tough, they really take a beating.  Although more involved, I'd seriously recommend replacing with the correct part, you'll sleep better.

 

GH

Yes, I too recommend correct bolt

A replacement put in the other way probably will damage the splines, making proper replacement improbable in the future

Looks like there is a lot of rust, you can clean it all up while in there.

Really not too difficult to remove hub and backing plate. Use big breaker bar and some heat !!

Nice Shock !!

Good Luck

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I used the 'big high grade bolt in the opposite way' method about 9 years ago on mine.  It's been through countless autocrosses, some track days, and daily abuse.  I think I went with a big allen head style bolt, as that was the highest grade I could find at the local bolt shop.  I haven't really looked at it in years, but I think its still there.

Oh, and for some reason I had to put a big fender washer on it as well.  For some odd reason the Bilstein can pop off of its bushing, and its a pain to get it back on there.  Odd, but fender washer solved that.

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I will probably use a bolt temporarily until I replace the trailing arms. For the bolt, just grind the rest off with an angle grinder, then drill out a hole? And all I need is the strongest bolt I can find with a locking nut and two washers?

I believe the factory pin is splined and is driven into place on the trailing arm tab. You might have to remove the brake backing plate to remove the remnants.  If you are going this far, I'd replace the pin with a new one.  No need to replace the entire trailing arm unless they are bent or horribly rusted.

 

IMG_9009_zpsc871ae01.jpg

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No, don't drill. Just cut it short and hit it with hammer. It will fall out. Cut it almost flush so it will fit to come out between the ear and backing plate.

 

As said I would use 10.9 grade bolt, that's what original suspension bolts generally are, 12.9 is just as good. 8.8 I would use only as temporary if better is not available at the moment. I would prefer all metal lock nut but nylock will do.

 

Of course I prefer original too but the work is just too much and includes several risks for the benefit in this case. You would need to open the 36mm nut which may be pretty tight (accident waiting to happen here), then you need to get it tightened properly with large torque wrench. Hub may need a puller to come out. You need take out brake line, which may break, then you need to bleed the brakes and you may break the bleeding screw. Potentially you need to buy new brake cylinder and line. Then you need to take out backing plate which is mounted with bolts that are never taken out. They are rusted and may break and you would need drill and tap those which is bigger trouble than the original. By this you probably have dirt and drill shavings in the wheel bearings... this goes on and on.

 

Of course if all goes well you might be able to fit the new oem bolt in half a day but altogether it just doesn't make sense for the originality because the bolt fix is just as strong.

 

  Tommy

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Humm, it has been a long while but I thought I just loosened the backing plate and was able to replace that splined bolt. Do not remember taking everything off but maybe I did.

I can confirm that the splined bolt can be removed without cutting by loosening the backplate, making hub removal unnecessary ( I just went to the garage and did it!) Thanks again Bill for pointing us in the right direction :)

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Just for your info Chuck02, there are no struts in the rear of an 02. Only shocks.

I would try driving out the remnants of the pin without heat first.  You should have no problems installing a correct (original) knurled stud. Just put a nut on the threaded end so you don't mangle it

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