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Testing Heater Core/fan. No Engine In Car


cbesing

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Hi,

In the middle of my restoration with engine out. Rust free car except significant rust in passenger floor pan. Window seal seemed fine so wondering if I have a heater core issue.

Any procedures for testing the core and the fan with no engine?

Thanks,

Chris

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Somebody here on the Forum posted a while ago about cutting a section of bike tube containing the valve then fastening It between the inlet and outlet and pumping it up to put pressure into the heater core. Monitor with pressure gauge to see if pressure drops over time. Could probably do this with heater box in the car. Search might turn up the post.

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Yup.  Just get 15 psi on it, and make sure it can hold it.

 

Then get car power up, and make sure the fan sounds ok.

 

 

Down side to this is, of course, that it might be marginal, work now,

and fail in 6 months.  The boxes are not durable, neither are the fans.

 

So if you have the time, pull the box, clean it up, and get the core

boiled out and checked.  And the motor checked out, and maybe

re- brushed.  It's worth the effort if you can do it now.

 

t

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Rob, thehackmechanic, started that thread about pressure testing heater cores.

But, seriously, if your number one culprit for your rust issue is the heater core, why not pull the heater out and have it exhaustively checked?

I'm assuming you don't have A/C, which could dump condensate on your passenger floor if the drains were not correctly configured or functioning properly.

Good luck,

Steve

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I have been putting off restoring my heater box as well.  The foam seals must be about gone, because I get air at my feet while driving at speed.  The defroster lever also springs back, due to a sticky flap, or two.  No leaks, but definitely needing attention.  If yours is original, you may have some similar symptoms.  Here is a link which was recently posted, in case you do decide to dig in.  (It has the photos which are missing in the FAQ article).

https://docs.google.com/file/d/0B-wiaquuHZPTZUtUclZlVllBbDQ/edit

 

I have read that if the rubber 'elephant trunk' drain tubes get clogged full of debris, the water can back up and find its way into the cab through the heater assembly.  I do not know the details, but this could be another source of the moisture which caused the rust you are dealing with.

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"I have read that if the rubber 'elephant trunk' drain tubes get clogged full of debris, the water can back up and find its way into the cab through the heater assembly.  I do not know the details, but this could be another source of the moisture which caused the rust you are dealing with."

 

Very true.  And this will occur even if the seal between the heater box and the car's body is good, as rain water will collect in the heater plenum chamber until it overflows into the heater inlet, then runs out the bottom of the heater box via the floor vents.  Those "elephant trunks" (AKA Duck Lips) also keep engine fumes out of the heater plenum and thus out of the car's interior.  So it's important to have 'em nice and flexible so that the lip at the bottom is closed unless draining water.  

 

cheers

mike

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