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New Doors


SydneyTii

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Guys,

 

I have 2 new doors on order and need a bit of advice on interior prep for the door shell. I will ultimately let a body shop paint and fit the doors, however is there anything I can do on the inside of the doors to increase the protection to the door internals that can still be painted over. I had thought about Hammerite but have read that Hammerite will crack under movement? what I was going to do was brush on a heavy coat of something all around the inside, especially the seams and bottom edges, then let the body shop paint it and cavity wax protect it, I am being a bit paranoid but I want the new doors to last. Not sure about seam sealer as I would hate to trap any moisture?

 

Your thoughts and opinions would be appreciated.

 

Cheers.

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Yep, I have done this everywhere else, so I think your suggestion is the way to go,  I like the idea of the capillary action of something like waxoyl, just a bit concerned that seam sealer will only go so far into a joint or crimped edge. What about me painting it prior to the body shop painting it inside? just leave it to them, i'm kinda leaning that way so I don't screw with work they do??

 

Cheers.

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After I cleaned all the seam sealer out of the inside bottom edge of my car's doors, I put a wand-type nozzle on a can of Rustoleum damp-proof red primer and squirted it the whole length of the lower inner edge, then let it dry.  Then I used a Waxoyl-type product over the paint.  No rust for the past 20+ years....

 

mike

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IMO, you can't be too paranoid about the potential rust:
http://www.bmw2002faq.com/topic/151951-restoration-well-under-way-one-panel-at-a-time/

(take a look at posts # 1 and 9 in that thread).

 

You can probably do a better job yourself than leaving it to the body shop because of the inordinate amount of time it takes to do that kind of prep work.  

 

Regards, Maurice.

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Here's the thing- there is NO WAY to get into the crimp- style seams that BMW used to make the 2002.

(short of opening up the crimp, of course.  But that's a REAL project, unless you're experienced in re- skinning...)

They were 5- year cars- they weren't MEANT to last any longer than that.

 

There aren't any paint products that stand a chance of getting into those seams.

And they are all in wet areas, if only from condensation.

 

So if the 'water thin' sealer can get in, it will- it'll wick in, set up, and provide a pretty

oxygen- and oxy-hydrogen- free environment.  Which is pretty good for arresting rust.

 

But if you prime and paint it, and the material prevents the sealer from getting in, then the seam

is open, and any oxygen and water that can get in will do what it does with the steel.

 

So yes, painting the insides is not a bad idea at all, as long as you don't seal up the seams

so that you can't get the wax in there. 

 

Your original concern about seam sealer's right on- you don't want to create a trap in there, no matter how small.

 

t

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Here is a tip that might help you or others. What I have done on my 1976 2002 on the inside lower edges of my doors, hood, and trunk lid where the outside metal is folded over to prevent rust is coat these areas with G.E. paintable  white silicone caulk bought at Lowes or Home Depot. The trick is to keep out air and/or moisture from the metal. I let the caulk cure in warm weather for a number of days or weeks then either brush on Rustoleum that I mix colors or use a Rustoleum spray can close to Sahara beige. The nice thing about the General Electric PAINTABLE caulk is that it does not fully harden. It stays somewhat firm but flexible. Here in the rust belt the cold and hot weather changes do not affect the caulk as the metal expands and shrinks with temp changes. Bondo, a cars worst enemy, does not expand and shrink thus moisture gets under it and results in the dreaded "bubbles" from beneath. When I apply a bead of caulk I simply smooth it out with my finger thus locking out moisture and air. It works great. I would never buy a different brand of caulk that is cheaper!!!!!!! It also has to be PAINTABLE G.E, silicone caulk. I have also run a bead of this product in other areas such as where the underside of the car meets the rocker panels plus other locations on the car. Believe it or not my system works great. Will it look factory when you open your doors and bend down low on your knees and examine your inner lower door sections? No it will NOT! However here in the rust belt- (Mass) one gets tired of repainting these areas every few years. For the insides of the doors and rockers etc. I squirt in used motor oil and then let the doors ,rockers, etc.  drip into dishpans or a row of CHEAP disposable oven roasting pans. Good luck fighting future rust!

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I have poured a little Ospho (rust converter) in my door bottoms and brushed a little along the seams on the underside of the trunk lid and hood.  Blisters are starting to show in the door corners.  Prepping new doors is one thing, treating originals is another.  I wonder if it is more effective (or possibly less?) to convert rust with acidic chemicals before adding Waxoyl.  I really need to get a bucket of Waxoyl.  It makes me sad to see blisters forming.  I have the mindset that it is better to pop the blisters, but I suppose that may only be true if I treat the rust upon exposing it.  I bought one of those sand blasting guns with the rubber tip that you press against the surface to blast small areas.  It also has a bag that catches the sand.  I will be chasing rust this winter and appreciate the wisdom that comes from threads like these... even if the original question was about new parts.

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That little sandblasting gun with the rubber tip (or "spotblaster") works very well under three conditions:

1.  The rust has not perforated the metal yet;

2.  The rust has not yet made the metal "paper thin"

3.  You have a powerful enough compressor to pump out enough PSI's.

 

Assuming all of the above, you then have a perfect surface, completely free of rust, which you can then attend to with the proper coatings.

 

Regards, Maurice.

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Ok thanks, I think I will paint the inside of the doors with either a one step paint or primer and top, something like rusto whatever minding not to flood the seams, I will then get it painted at the shop and I will top up aka flood it with waxoyl when I get it back on the side seams and whole of the bottom, I realise this wlll be an annual thing but better safe than sorry. Thanks for the advice etc.

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