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Hey Colin C '72 got another question on the fuel line repla


Guest Anonymous

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Guest Anonymous

Can I shorten the metal fuel line under the car so that it ends directly below the firewall (currently it ends below the steering box near the driver's wheel which is closer to the front of the car than the fuel pump)? This would allow the rubber line to go straight up along the firewall and then over to the fuel pump.

Right now, I would need to have two "bends" in the rubber fuel line from the end of the metal line to the back of the fuel pump since the end of the line is closer to the front of the car than the fuel pump. I would think the idea is to have as few "bends" in the fuel line as possible. Does this make sense? I am doing this from memory because the car is in storage and difficult to get under to look at properly.

Also, I looked at the existing return fuel line that runs from the tank to the metal line under the car. If I were to replace that one as well (as you suggested in your earlier post) do I need any special type of fuel hose (instead of just the regular black rubber fuel line) since it is exposed to more of the elements?

Chuck

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Guest Anonymous

Hey Chuck,

At the front of the car, you can either cut the metal line off below the firewall (use a tubing cutter) and run a rubber line up the firewall to the fuel pump, or get a tubing bender and bend the metal line so it runs up the firewall, and use a shorter rubber line to go to the pump. Either way, make sure to use high quality rubber line (like the BMW stuff Max sells) and make sure it's anchored out of harm's way. At the back of the car, the existing rubber line from the tank to the metal line is held in metal clips under the car. Just replace it with a new piece of rubber line (it's probably deteriorated by now) and connect the "tank end" to the fuel pickup connection on the fuel sender rather than to the return port on the tank where it was originally connected. Then block off the return connection on the tank with a short piece of rubber line with a plug or bolt clamped in the end.

HTH

Colin

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Guest Anonymous

conversation,but are you thinking of the metal line as the supply line or the return line? the plastic supply line runs in the interior, and the return is only used if the return valve is still in place, I've only seen a couple without solexes that still had the valve. I may have the original type braided line. Dave

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Guest Anonymous

in an effort to minimize the slight gas smell there. My car is a 76 with a Weber 32/36 carb (ie no return valve). I basically plan to switch the two lines in the trunk and use the "return" metal line under the car as my new supply line. I would either get ambitious and pull the lines out of the interior or just cap them off. I am also planning to remove the charcoal cannister and the related vapor items, "euro-venting" the fuel tank out the back end of the car. I also plan to put all new rubber fuel lines for:

tank to "return" line; and

"return" line to fuel pump

I was just wondering what type of fuel line people use when updating like this and also whether I could shorten the metal line so that it ends closer to the firewall versus where it is now (under the steering box).

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Guest Anonymous

Or even better, this might be a good project to post on this website!

This sounds like a great idea to get rid of my gas smells. Also, I would like to know more about "european venting". Do you still use the accumulator tank, or just vent straight down?

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Guest Anonymous

in an effort to remove all the "unnecessary" items -- you know all that 25 year old environmental friendly gadgets that the state of WI does care about. I used to live in Denver. Can you get away with removing charcoal cannister, vapor tank, etc.?

Chuck

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It passed its "one time" emmision test with flying colors. They didn't even look at that system (or the exhaust etc). I have been battling gas smells for a year. I have replaced the filler rubber, charcoal canister, trunk tubing, and re capped the unused "fuel return line" (electric fuel pump now). Still smells like gas when I fill it up....arrrgggg. Let me know how your conversion works. I would be very interested in duplicating this process on my atlantikblau 72.

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Guest Anonymous

gary, i use to ahve the same problem when i did fil up the tank. i end up relacing the filler boot. i also pulled the tank and cleaned it and found some small holes and crecks along the seam, used jb weld on the cracks, painted and smell was gone. hope that helps. 7AO '71 02

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