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Air Suction Routing On Stock Air Filter


Buckeye
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I have decided to revert back to the original air filter housing on Weber 32/36. So far I have been able to acquire an air filter housing, rubber boot, air box and jam engineering adapter. The part that is not clear is what was used on exhaust side supplying warm air to air box on 1976 year model? Attached a couple pictures and different options may have been used. Will greatly appreciate if anyone that is still running stock air suction to the carburetor especially on 76 can provide a few pictures.

I also like to hear comments whether is necessary.

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post-43112-0-70952600-1388014313.jpg

Edited by Buckeye
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I have yet to discern the pattern but some square taillight examples were factory equipped with a steel heat shield on top of the exhaust manifold -- as above -- while others, such as my April '76 version (VIN 2742541) pictured below, were produced with aluminum heat shields. I don't believe this fact changes anything with respect to the winter pre-heater setup, but it imparts a different look.

Steve

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Conserv's picture is I think the first time I've seen the cast aluminum hot air collector on a squarelight.  In fact, I always thought the aluminum shield was replaced with a sheet metal one sometime in 1971/72.  My '73 came with the sheet metal one; my '69 has aluminum.  

 

A word on the JAM engineering factory air cleaner-to-Weber carb adapter:  Make sure it won't make the air cleaner sit too high so that it hits the underside of the hood with the hood latched.  This is especially true if you have the heat block (a bakelite spacer placed between manifold and carb to prevent heat soak and fuel boiling in the carb).  The adapter wouldn't fit on my '73, so I simply took tinsnips and a Dremel tool, cut out the opening on the air cleaner base and then made a gasket from some closed cell foam to seal the space between carb and air cleaner.  

 

cheers

mike

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Rains, Thanks for the picture. That is one clean and beautiful engine compartment.

Like this. I think that's'\ what John was describing. -Raine

Steve, thank you for the picture. Your engine bay another super nice one.

My car was built in April' 76 (VIN 2742702) and since the VINs are very close I am going to go with aluminum heat shield. Incidentally there is one for sale, which I plan to purchase.

I have yet to discern the pattern but some square taillight examples were factory equipped with a steel heat shield on top of the exhaust manifold -- as above -- while others, such as my April '76 version (VIN 2742541) pictured below, were produced with aluminum heat shields. I don't believe this fact changes anything with respect to the winter pre-heater setup, but it imparts a different look.

Steve

Mike thanks for advice. I saw similar topics where you given heads up on interferences. Surprisingly I don't have clearance issue even with two Bakelite already under the carb. In fact, I put dabs of grease on top of air cleaner cover, closed the hood, start the engine and open the hood and there is no trace of grease on hood inside. I did it this way in a absence blue compound.

A word on the JAM engineering factory air cleaner-to-Weber carb adapter: Make sure it won't make the air cleaner sit too high so that it hits the underside of the hood with the hood latched. This is especially true if you have the heat block (a bakelite spacer placed between manifold and carb to prevent heat soak and fuel boiling in the carb).

cheers

mike

Edited by Buckeye
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In California we see aluminum heat sheilds on the cast iron ex manifolds and sheetmetal shields on the thermal reactors

That would make sense as I've seen many '75's with the steel heat shield (all U.S. '75's were delivered with thermal reactors) but virtually no '76's with the steel heat shield (only California-version '76's were delivered with thermal reactors). I'm originally from the Northeast and didn't see a California-version '76 until the '90's!

Steve

Edited by Conserv
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Buckeye,

 

I live in CA and drive a 76.  I can take pics for you later this evening.  But the parts diagram says it all.  My comments:

 

Part #1)  That piece is actually welded onto the end of the manifold pipe.  For the longest time, I heard this harmonic rattle that I would only hear in the 2K range.  Drove me nuts.  One day I was poking around there and realized that the weld had snapped off.  that #1 piece was sitting on top, just having a great time rattling and driving me nuts.  Literally took that part off, cleaned off the rust, same with the manifold pipe, and tack welded as best as I could.  No more rattle and sanity was restored.  Anyways, this part is where the pre-heat during start up comes from.  Heats up the metal, the heat travels through the hose, etc.

 

Part #2)  That is a heat sleeve that goes over part #1.  It's to prevent #3 from burning up.  You need it

 

Part #3)  Mine is a corrugated paper hose.  I've seen a metallic version at O-Reilly's.  I took a pic but can't find it on my phone.  I bought #2 and #3 from RealOEM a while back.  

 

The device at the top (pre-heater) has a lever on the side.  One is for summer setting and one is for winter setting.  I forget which orientation corresponds to winter and summer.  

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The device at the top (pre-heater) has a lever on the side.  One is for summer setting and one is for winter setting.  I forget which orientation corresponds to winter and summer.  

 

The locked (vertical) orientation is the "summer" setting. The horizontal setting allows the lever to move with the bimetallic element inside that adjusts the airflow from engine-bay to outside air as the car heats up. My box has German instructions on it that essentially read, "Put the lever here in the autumn for preheating" (that's the gist; my German isn't that good).

 

-David

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Here's the photos, hope this addresses your questions:

 

11660320636_43278d51ef.jpg

 

11659793443_72ea72e50c.jpg

 

11660323326_116d1519f2.jpg

 

That silver ring is the hose clamp


The locked (vertical) orientation is the "summer" setting. The horizontal setting allows the lever to move with the bimetallic element inside that adjusts the airflow from engine-bay to outside air as the car heats up. My box has German instructions on it that essentially read, "Put the lever here in the autumn for preheating" (that's the gist; my German isn't that good).

 

-David

 

David,

 

Thanks for clarifying.  This is a perfect time to bust out the Brother P-touch and make a label!

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