Jump to content
  • When you click on links to various merchants on this site and make a purchase, this can result in this site earning a commission. Affiliate programs and affiliations include, but are not limited to, the eBay Partner Network.

Doors Don't Like To Shut Right


glemon
Go to solution Solved by glemon,

Recommended Posts

My doors close, but loosely, they shut, but not to the final click unless I really slam it firmly and don't let it bounce back.  Have read a little bit about it in the archives, which mostly talked about replacement seals causing the problem but not much about a solution, other than they sometimes settle over time, I think I have replacement door seals, but they have been on a while, any fixes other than futzing with the striker plate? (which I have tried already a few times) I think it is worse now in the cold (stiffer seals, presumably).

Edited by glemon

Lincoln, NE

74 2002

68 Triumph TR250

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The latch mechanism may be sluggish.  Open the door.  View the door mechanism.  Turn the mechanism as it would be to latch the door.  How operate the handle.  Did the latch open quickly?  If not you have a project to remove the mechanism, clean, relube and reinstall.

You may also be missing a small rubber tip that goes on the latch finger end, which moves the latch when the door closes to make the catch work.

Edited by jimk

A radiator shop is a good place to take a leak.

 

I have no idea what I'm doing but I know I'm really good at it.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Do you have these on the latches?

$1.95 at Bav Auto, Blunt probably sells it for $.95.
Part #51 21 1 809 735 Door Latch Buffer 

51211809735.jpg

1971 - 2002 RHD VIN 1653940. Agave (stock with Pertronix & 32/36 Weber) - "Cactus"

1972 - 1602 RHD VIN 1554408. Fjord (with 2L motor, 5spd & LSD - Weber 40/40 to come) - "Bluey"

1984 - E30 318i VIN WBAAK320208722176 - stock daily driver

Link to comment
Share on other sites

it goes on the end of the door latch......

sorry don't have a picture of that handy.  just go to realoem  and look up the part number.  diagram shows where it goes.

 

or search on forum for door latch.  here is just one of the many threads on this....

http://www.bmw2002faq.com/topic/130942-door-adjustment-advice/

Edited by mlytle

3xM3

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Solution

I had already looked at the link in the prior thread, which wasn't much help, as it went to a main page, then looked at the parts diagram on the Penske Parts page, which also wasn't much help, then looked at my car, and figured it must go on the u shaped thing that goes around the post mechanism that holds the door shut, on the side with the two detents to hold the rubber piece in place.  Then I saw Original Customs pic, which confirmed it, nope haint got nothing like that on my car, will order a couple would think it would do the trick of getting the mechanism to go far enough to lock by the looks of it, should be a cheap and easy fix.   THANKS.

 

Edit: Ordered a set on Flea Bay, a couple quarters more, but free shipping, seller tilux (nice name) is this anyone on the forum?

Edited by glemon

Lincoln, NE

74 2002

68 Triumph TR250

Link to comment
Share on other sites

+4

 

Those missing little "door latch buffers" are definitely the cause of the problem that you describe.

 

It's happened to me a number of times over the years and replacing them did the trick every time.  The first time, I was very surprised that such a little part could make such a big difference, but it did.

 

Regards, Maurice.

Edited by schoir
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I had already looked at the link in the prior thread, which wasn't much help, as it went to a main page, then looked at the parts diagram on the Penske Parts page, which also wasn't much help, then looked at my car, and figured it must go on the u shaped thing that goes around the post mechanism that holds the door shut, on the side with the two detents to hold the rubber piece in place.  Then I saw Original Customs pic, which confirmed it, nope haint got nothing like that on my car, will order a couple would think it would do the trick of getting the mechanism to go far enough to lock by the looks of it, should be a cheap and easy fix.   THANKS.

 

Edit: Ordered a set on Flea Bay, a couple quarters more, but free shipping, seller tilux (nice name) is this anyone on the forum?

 

 

yes Tilux is a member here and a good guy.

www.BluntTech.com
FAQ Supporting Vendor
 Sales@BluntTech.com

Link to comment
Share on other sites

While you're waiting for the little "corn kernels" to arrive, you can substitute a little piece of plastic or rubber hose (like fuel line) slipped over the inner leg of the u-shaped latch.  They work just as well as the factory part, just aren't as asthetically pleasing.  

 

Also--quick and dirty way to lube the latch mechanism without removing the upholstery panel:

 

1.  drizzle a little light oil around the rotating collar that the U-shaped latch is attached to

2.  remove the two screws that hold the trapezoid-shaped rubber buffer, take a WD40 can and bend the nozzle down at its end.  Insert through the screw holes and squirt.  

 

The WD40 will at least soften the 40 year old grease and grunge on the mechanism and make it work a little faster until you can take the door apart, remove the latch assy and soak it in degreaser/kerosene/carb cleaner and re-lubricate.

 

cheers

mike

'69 Nevada sunroof-Wolfgang-bought new
'73 Sahara sunroof-Ludwig-since '78
'91 Brillantrot 318is sunroof-Georg Friederich 
Fiat Topolini (Benito & Luigi), Renault 4CVs (Anatole, Lucky Pierre, Brigette) & Kermit, the Bugeye Sprite

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 1 month later...

I was pretty skeptical about this actually working for a few bucks. Ordered them from the dealer and sure enough those little bastards did the trick. No more slamming my doors, they shut so nicely I don't feel like I'm going to break the glass. I'm a believer. This actually worked.

 

Your username cracked me up.

I always yell "get to the choppah" whenever a helicopter flies overhead.  Most don't get the reference and just look at me like I'm crazy.  Which is partly true, anyway.  ;)

'84 323i Euro Edition

'85 325e (parts)

'14 328i Sports Wagon

'69 2002 Chamonix

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

  • BMW Neue Klasse - a birth of a Sports Sedan

    BMW Neue Klasse - a birth of a Sports Sedan

    Unveiling of the Neue Klasse Unveiled in 1961, BMW 1500 sedan was a revolutionary concept at the outset of the '60s. No tail fins or chrome fountains. Instead, what you got was understated and elegant, in a modern sense, exciting to drive as nearly any sports car, and yet still comfortable for four.   The elegant little sedan was an instant sensation. In the 1500, BMW not only found the long-term solution to its dire business straits but, more importantly, created an entirely new
    History of the BMW 2002 and the 02 Series

    History of the BMW 2002 and the 02 Series

    In 1966, BMW was practically unknown in the US unless you were a touring motorcycle enthusiast or had seen an Isetta given away on a quiz show.  BMW’s sales in the US that year were just 1253 cars.  Then BMW 1600-2 came to America’s shores, tripling US sales to 4564 the following year, boosted by favorable articles in the Buff Books. Car and Driver called it “the best $2500 sedan anywhere.”  Road & Track’s road test was equally enthusiastic.  Then, BMW took a cue from American manufacturers,
    The BMW 2002 Production Run

    The BMW 2002 Production Run

    BMW 02 series are like the original Volkswagen Beetles in one way (besides both being German classic cars)—throughout their long production, they all essentially look alike—at least to the uninitiated:  small, boxy, rear-wheel drive, two-door sedan.  Aficionados know better.   Not only were there three other body styles—none, unfortunately, exported to the US—but there were some significant visual and mechanical changes over their eleven-year production run.   I’ve extracted t
  • Upcoming Events

  • Supporting Vendors

×
×
  • Create New...