Jump to content

Recommended Posts

This topic has most likely been covered a 100 times but I did not find anything with the search. I have a stock 74' 2002 with approximately 60,000 miles on a rebuild and I'm curious if anyone can give me any ideas of what kinds of RMP's I can safely run at on the interest's. I typically run at 3500 to 4000 now. Which puts me in the 60 to 70 MPH range. Is that low, just right, or a little high to hold the RMP's constant for an hour or better on a trip. I don't burn excess oil, temp stays below half way mark, no lights, flashers or buzzers going off. I guess I'm wondering if I couldn't run it at 4500 RPM and really keep up with all the traffic.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Replies 32
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

Top Posters In This Topic

Popular Posts

there is no problem with running a properly maintained M10 at any level below the redline for long periods. it is NOT beating on it and it WAS made to run like that.  if you are below 4k rpm all the t

In 1974 we drove from the BMW factory in Munich to the Nurburgring and spent a lot of the trip on the autobahn at close to 6000 in top gear (and we were in the RIGHT lane) If it is a healthy engine do

They all speak the truth , these little bleeders of ours love to rev & stretch their legs on the open highway.REV BABY REV.

Posted Images

I try not to stay at that high of RPM for too long. Its just not good to be beating the motor like that. It wasn't made to run at that high of speeds for long periods of time. On the freeway I typically am between 3000-3500 and my car is a weekend vehicle so it's only every once in a while.

Edited by bmwbabe
Link to post
Share on other sites

Are you new to 2002s? I was 3 years ago, and was nervous about over-revving as well. After a few months, I realized that these suckers LOVE to rev, and actually 'settle in' or 'hunker down' the faster you go. (I know this sounds weird) They are happy north of 4000+ RPMs. I've gone on 2 hour trips (each way) at a constant 4000 RPMs. It did run somewhat hot, but that's what the heater is for in the summer ;)  I haven't taken my '02 over 5000 RPMs on constant highway driving, but this is what they were designed for.... If you are nervous, do some short trips, and lengthen the trip, revving the engine at higher RPMs each time.... FWIW, I usually rev at 4300-4500 (75-80 mph) when I'm on the highway for long trips...

Edited by BlueBarchetta
  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

I believe the '74 has a 3.64 diff (stock) as opposed to the 3.91 in my '76.  I am thinking of swapping mine for a recently acquired 3.64 during the rear re-bush procedure.  I know they can withstand higher RPMs, but I keep reaching for a fifth gear that is not there.  I will keep the original, in case I ever go the five speed route, but that will not be any time soon. 

 

Two questions... can the engine take the revving and can you tolerate the decibels? 

Link to post
Share on other sites

Are you new to 2002s? I was 3 years ago, and was nervous about over-revving as well. After a few months, I realized that these suckers LOVE to rev, and actually 'settle in' or 'hunker down' the faster you go. (I know this sounds weird) They are happy north of 4000+ RPMs. I've gone on 2 hour trips (each way) at a constant 4000 RPMs. It did run somewhat hot, but that's what the heater is for in the summer ;)  I haven't taken my '02 over 5000 RPMs on constant highway driving, but this is what they were designed for.... If you are nervous, do some short trips, and lengthen the trip, revving the engine at higher RPMs each time.... FWIW, I usually rev at 4300-4500 (75-80 mph) when I'm on the highway for long trips...

Link to post
Share on other sites

there is no problem with running a properly maintained M10 at any level below the redline for long periods. it is NOT beating on it and it WAS made to run like that.  if you are below 4k rpm all the time you are missing out on the "fun zone" of these engines. wind'em up!

Edited by mlytle
Link to post
Share on other sites

 The advertising literature from days gone by will tell you the 2002 was designed to cruise at autobahn speeds all day long, which let's say equates to 100mph.  My RPM chart says that's 5,200rpm give or take.

 

 so +1 the other guys ...... you're a long way from doing any engine damage.  My engine has 240,000 miles and I've worried about it.

 

Go fast and be safe while doing so.

 

Cheers,

 

Carl

Edited by OriginalOwner
Link to post
Share on other sites

In 1974 we drove from the BMW factory in Munich to the Nurburgring and spent a lot of the trip on the autobahn at close to 6000 in top gear (and we were in the RIGHT lane) If it is a healthy engine don't worry about cruising at 5000-5500 they really do like it (your fuel mileage will suffer, shoving that box through the air at that speed is not easy)

Link to post
Share on other sites

In 1974 we drove from the BMW factory in Munich to the Nurburgring and spent a lot of the trip on the autobahn at close to 6000 in top gear (and we were in the RIGHT lane) If it is a healthy engine don't worry about cruising at 5000-5500 they really do like it (your fuel mileage will suffer, shoving that box through the air at that speed is not easy)

:D

Link to post
Share on other sites

With a 3.64 differential, a 4 speed tranny will cause the engine to turn 4000 rpm at 74 mph.  With the overdrive 5 speed, the revs drop to about 3200 at the same 74 mph.  Neither will come even close to stressing the engine so long as it's not been abused. 

 

My 1969 owners manual says not to drive above 100 mph for sustained periods....

 

mike

  • Haha 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.




×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.