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Whats The Difference.....


Robotin
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Looks a little like the Pierburg (Italian) one I recently bought from Blunt for my '73 2002 with the multiple screws holding top and bottom together, but mine doesn't have the large port at 4 o'clock. While I eventually got it on, the new one was shorter than the original (like yours) and was a tough fit over the water hose that runs underneath to the manifold. Don't know for sure, but yours might even be from a different make or model.

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my car has the e21 water outlet w/o the manifold ports, but when i installed the R fuel pump, no fuel came out, i cranked about 10 times and primed the lines, but no pressure. i was told it was off a '70 with a korman. i made the sure push rod at it's highest point, during installation i felt resistance which i believed to be the push rod pushing on the lever inside. 

 

 

also i took apart the R pump and the vacuum/seal didnt have any cracks and didnt seem to b dry. 

 

most confused!

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There are two different lengths of push rod for fuel pumps. You should be able to compare the actuators on theback of the pumps. There are pumps with 'rectangular' levers on the back and pumps with a 'button' and spring on the back. I can't remember which way around they go but they don't intermix without swapping the pushrod.

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Pump on the left is the one fitted to US 2002s when the carb was changed from the 1 bbl Solex to the 2 bbl.  It can't be rebuilt.  The one on the left is for earlier US cars with one bbl Solexes, built up to late 1972 model year. It can be rebuilt with an air cooled VW Beetle fuel pump rebuild kit. This pump was also used on Euro ti's with dual sidedraft Solexes, so has plenty of pumping capacity for a two barrel Weber. 

 

They use different length pushrods but will work on any 1600 or 2002 head--with the correct pushrod. 

 

FYI,the Italian-made replacement early style pumps have weak pushrod pads--the part the pushrod strikes.  They are softer than the pushrod and will wear through.  Ask me how I found this out.  Also, after a lot of miles the pushrod itself will wear.  Check both pushrod ends; they should be flat and at right angles with the shaft, not beveled. 

cheers

mike. 

Edited by mike
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Pump on the left is the one fitted to US 2002s when the carb was changed from the 1 bbl Solex to the 2 bbl. It can't be rebuilt. The one on the left is for earlier US cars with one bbl Solexes, built up to late 1972 model year. It can be rebuilt with an air cooled VW Beetle fuel pump rebuild kit. This pump was also used on Euro ti's with dual sidedraft Solexes, so has plenty of pumping capacity for a two barrel Weber.

They use different length pushrods but will work on any 1600 or 2002 head--with the correct pushrod.

FYI,the Italian-made replacement early style pump have weak pushrod pads--the part the pushrod strikes. They are softer than the pushrod and will wear through. Ask me how I found this out.

cheers

mike.

Two lefts don't make a right... But three do.

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