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Wiring Kill Switch, Where To Hide It?


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So I daily my 02 and my school is a hot spot for car thieves. The rumor is that the local gangs use the school as an initiation to the gang. Mainly Hondas that are getting stolen but I feel like the 02 would be pretty damn easy to steal. Anyhow, I want to wire in an ignition kill switch somewhere but I figure since I'm doing an engine swap next week I might as well find a clever way to hide it. I'm thinking wiring it in to the knob for the fog lights or possibly doing something with the mystery green button in the console (though that would be less inconspicuous) or something like that (or maybe somewhere else?). Has anyone done something like this? Also, what would it take to wire it into the fog light knob?

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Put the fog switch on the wire going to the positive terminal of the coil, it will crank all day long, but not start.  

If you put a switch on the wire to the starter, it wont crank, but you can still push start it.

Also just hope that no thief near your school is reading this post :)

HTH Beaner7102

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Another thought is to put the kill switch on the fuel pump, if you have an electric pump. That way there will be just enough fuel in the lines to get the car started, but it will die in the street after a few blocks, and attract attention to whoever is attempting to make off with your car.

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Nowadays it seems a manual transmission alone deters many thieves since they don't know how to operate one . . . . .

 

On a more serious note, consider putting a secondary, hidden switch in the starter circuit.  There was once a thread on here about putting a hidden button switch under the dash or carpet that must be depressed at the same time the key is turned to the start position.  Both switches must be simultaneously pressed to complete the circuit.  This approach has the additional advantage of not giving a thief the opportunity to run down your battery. 

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I had something like Beaner mentioned above.  I took two old headlight switches and hooked them up in both the fog and defrost positions to where you had to pull the fog to the first indent and the defrost to the second indent to activate the electric fuel pump.  As Ian said, without both switches in the correct position, you could start the car and drive about a hundred yards before the the car would die.

 

TK

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Ditto with JackF for the battery disconnect as a security and safety measure.  You can get creative on hiding a low current switch and use a relay in series with the IGN to starter solenoid circuit from iGN switch.  RS sells very small low current switches easy to hide under dash.

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When I bought my tii about 20 years ago the previous owner had installed a toggle switch forward to the hood release level.  Throw the toggle and it kills the ignition but not the starter.  She'll crank and crank and hopefully the theft will just give up thinking it's and old car and won't start. 

 

Warning though, I do tell every mechanic who has worked on the car about this, but sometimes they forget.  One ended up bumping the switch, not being able to start it, and had to phone me asking if I had any hidden security on the car. 

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Interesting timing on this thread (it has been discussed before)..

 

1) I believe I just read in Rob Siegel's book where he described Yale Rachlin wired the high beam stalk in his 74tii so that you had to pull it when cranking the engine.  Not sure how well that would work if you had a low battery.  

 

2) Not too convenient, but I have heard of folks substituting a vacuum hose for the coil wire when they park (or just remove the rotor).

 

3) I added a fused toggle switch for the electric fuel pump in my VW Bug (inside the glove box).

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Removable steering wheels are a pain to carry around. And a kill switch can be found.

 

My plan is to someday fabricate a removable shifter. I want to be able to remove a pin and be able to take the shifter handle quickly and easily out of the car. I don't need a bag to carry around a wheel, Just slip the shifter handle into my jacket pocket.

 

That's my plan at least.

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So far I think the best idea is are the original two, using one of the existing knobs/switches and killing the coil. I have a battery kill switch I use for doing electrical work, but it is in the engine bay, and when I shut it off I have to reset my stereo (could run a bypass for the stereo but I only use it to make electrical work easier). I doubt a theif would work hard enough to try all the various knobs and switches in the car on the off chance they MIGHT start it.

 

+1 on Zorac's idea too, I might run one of those just for the cool factor. 

 

I don't like the fuel pump idea because I would worry a thief would get my car onto the street, then leave it there when it dies, then it'd get towed. If I have to deal with an attempted theft I'd like to not have to pay to get it out of car prison also.

 

JMHO

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