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Distributor-Less Camshaft


Rocan
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Anybody ever seen one or made one? A lot of people run crank-trigger ignition. Clearly this would mean the cam could only be used in a crank fire m10, but it would also mean a lighter, better balanced cam, and that the distributor housing could be blanked off. Only issue I see would be having to find a place to hook up the oil pressure sender, but that is a piece of cake. I figure 5 minutes on a lathe with a parting tool would do the bulk of the work and a few more minutes with a bandsaw, scrap aluminum, and some bolts with gaskets would take care of the rest of the job, then just tap the new cover for the oil pressure sender. The weight isn't much, but every bit counts, especially if you are going for high revs. 

 

Thoughts?

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Honestly, not worth the effort, unless you like the 'smooth' look.

 

The cam's turning half crank speed, and it weighs about what ONE

crank counterweight weighs.

 

On top of that, a parting tool can take half your head off when it binds on something-

which they seem to do just to be a pain in the butt.

 

But I DO think the smooth look (and lack of crap on the back of the head) might be nice

just in the 'because it looks better' camp.

 

Kind of like taking the heater air 'box' off the race car made it loads easier to work on.

 

t

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I figured that it wouldn't be a big deal (though the smooth look IS nice :) ), but I am curious just how much that bit weighs. camshafts weigh quite a bit, and although they only turn at half crank speed, 3500rpm is still very fast and since people go to such great lengths to reduce inertia, why not hack off the bit that you don't use? 

 

Hmm, now I'm thinking I should find a gunsmith and have him bore the center of the cam, then drill the unloaded sides of the lobes and with a dry sump system run oil straight through the cam using the back side of the head. Reduced wear, reduced weight... only negatives would be cost. 

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Don't waste your time on the cam. Cut the counterweights of the crank.

can you recommend a good machine shop to knife-edge/ and balance a crank? Anyone who takes stock cranks and strokes them out?

 

Surely getting the work done would be cheaper than buying a new stroker crank outright.

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Dunno where you are, but Johnnie at Autosport Seattle has someone who does it.

 

Yah, seriously, pick up a crank in one hand and a cam in another.  Then hold them by their

ends and try to twist them.

 

You'll set the cam down and start sawin' on that crank!

 

heh

 

t

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There are shops here in Southern California who will knife-edge and balance crankshafts (and one who does a great job getting them super-straight). I've seen a production line of welded VW stroker cranks, but haven't gone down the road of doing that for an M10. -KB

post-35761-0-17631000-1369157915_thumb.j

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That is some pretty work. Anyone have some figures on the weight reduction on a street grind knife edge? I've worked with honda CB350 motors and know of people who have cut half the weight off stock cranks with no adverse effects. I figure the m10 bottom end is so overbuilt that there is a good bit of weight to be shed. Combined with an aluminum flywheel it should be a hoot!

Also I'm on the east coast... I don't mind shipping if the price is right though. Anyone have some actual cost numbers?

Edited by Rocan
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