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Strut Brace Design


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I purchased a strut brace from Ireland Engineering a year or so ago and am noticing signs of fatigue. The aluminum plates have bent a bit and the powder coating is flaking off. I am tempted to triangulate the brace and attach it to the firewall as well. I would purchase SS 1" tubing and cope/weld it to the existing piece, then weld it to a piece of SS angle or rectangular tubing which would bolt to the underside of the flange at the wall. I will replicate the aluminum lugs on the original and bolt it there also. It looks like a fun little TIG project and I am just wondering whether it will make much difference. Opinions? Tom

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Hi Tom, The piece there is purely non-sctructural (if you look on most race 2002's that piece is simply removed for better access to the rear of the engine) structurally speaking there would be no gain (just added weight).

For example.

IMG_4665-1_zpsde60e2c2.jpg

If you wanted to add structural bracing, extend forward. Though then you'd need something to attach to as well.

As overdone here.

IMG_0571-1.jpg

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I have not seen it done, but, just "thinking outside the box" I wonder if it would be practical to go down diagonally forward to the frame rails. Driver's side would be a little tight, but do-able. Passenger's side is pretty wide open. I do not know if this would structurally add to the strut bar, or not. You would have to attach to the existing bar rather than at the end plates @ the strut bearings.

Maybe the engineers amoung us will chime in with their thoughts.

Bob Napier

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If it was me I would try to find a way to put the bar directly over the top of the strut instead of being offset backwards. I would also hook it to the outside of the ring (fender side) so that the force is transferred onto the mount and the body, not just the mount. May be hard for someone else to visualize.

-Nathan
'76 2002 in Malaga (110k Original, 2nd Owner, sat for 20 years and now a toy)
'86 Chevy K20 (6.2 Turbo Diesel build) & '46 Chevy 2 Ton Dump Truck
'74 Suzuki TS185, '68 BSA A65 Lightning (garage find), '74 BMW R90S US Spec #2

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I kinda like the way these guys do it:

http://masonengineering.net/Subpages/2002.htm

A straight piece of tubing is very strong under tension or compression.

Any time you have a bend in it, all tension and compression loads are converted to bending loads and it isn't very stiff anymore.

Edited once to correct spelling.

No amount of skill or education will ever replace dumb luck
1971 2002 (much modified rocket),  1987 635CSI (beauty),  

2000 323i,  1996 Silverado Pickup (very useful)

Too many cars.

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If I were doing the body on my car today I'd have the convertible braces put in.

My old aluminum BMP strut brace bent all over the place. Then again, my old rusty frame rail and 1 inch Metric Mechanic sway bar weren't helping.

John

Fresh squeezed horseshoes and hand grenades

1665778

 

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I wouldn't say that a bent piece of metal is a spring. It depends on where the load is.

Get a piece of structural steel, support it at the ends, put a weight in the center and measure the deflection. Then, get that entire length of steel and roll it in to a complete ring or even an arch which is supported and put the same load on it, the deflection is going to be less. Because you are rolling in stresses, you are in fact, changing the modulus of elasticity. This is the very reason cold rolled steel is stronger than hot rolled steel, because you are rolling in stresses.

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I wouldn't say that a bent piece of metal is a spring. It depends on where the load is.

Get a piece of structural steel, support it at the ends, put a weight in the center and measure the deflection. Then, get that entire length of steel and roll it in to a complete ring or even an arch which is supported and put the same load on it, the deflection is going to be less. Because you are rolling in stresses, you are in fact, changing the modulus of elasticity. This is the very reason cold rolled steel is stronger than hot rolled steel, because you are rolling in stresses.

Contrary to popular belief, the modulus of elasticity of steel is very much the same (within less than 5%) no matter what the alloy, or how it has been worked, heat treated, hardened etc.

In other words, mild (low carbon) steel is just as stiff as spring steel. Don't believe it? Pick up a machinery's handbook, google it, or click this link. http://www.engineersedge.com/manufacturing_spec/properties_of_metals_strength.htm

No amount of skill or education will ever replace dumb luck
1971 2002 (much modified rocket),  1987 635CSI (beauty),  

2000 323i,  1996 Silverado Pickup (very useful)

Too many cars.

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