Jump to content
'76mintgrün'02

Strut Brace Design

14 posts / 3300 viewsLast Reply

Recommended Posts

I purchased a strut brace from Ireland Engineering a year or so ago and am noticing signs of fatigue. The aluminum plates have bent a bit and the powder coating is flaking off. I am tempted to triangulate the brace and attach it to the firewall as well. I would purchase SS 1" tubing and cope/weld it to the existing piece, then weld it to a piece of SS angle or rectangular tubing which would bolt to the underside of the flange at the wall. I will replicate the aluminum lugs on the original and bolt it there also. It looks like a fun little TIG project and I am just wondering whether it will make much difference. Opinions? Tom

photo 034.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Tom, The piece there is purely non-sctructural (if you look on most race 2002's that piece is simply removed for better access to the rear of the engine) structurally speaking there would be no gain (just added weight).

For example.

IMG_4665-1_zpsde60e2c2.jpg

If you wanted to add structural bracing, extend forward. Though then you'd need something to attach to as well.

As overdone here.

IMG_0571-1.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have not seen it done, but, just "thinking outside the box" I wonder if it would be practical to go down diagonally forward to the frame rails. Driver's side would be a little tight, but do-able. Passenger's side is pretty wide open. I do not know if this would structurally add to the strut bar, or not. You would have to attach to the existing bar rather than at the end plates @ the strut bearings.

Maybe the engineers amoung us will chime in with their thoughts.

Bob Napier

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If it was me I would try to find a way to put the bar directly over the top of the strut instead of being offset backwards. I would also hook it to the outside of the ring (fender side) so that the force is transferred onto the mount and the body, not just the mount. May be hard for someone else to visualize.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Is it possible the plate wasn't torqued down all the way? Hence the reason for the paint to flake off?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I kinda like the way these guys do it:

http://masonengineering.net/Subpages/2002.htm

A straight piece of tubing is very strong under tension or compression.

Any time you have a bend in it, all tension and compression loads are converted to bending loads and it isn't very stiff anymore.

Edited once to correct spelling.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

over the years I've seen ones that connect right there. Is it maybe from TEP?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If I were doing the body on my car today I'd have the convertible braces put in.

My old aluminum BMP strut brace bent all over the place. Then again, my old rusty frame rail and 1 inch Metric Mechanic sway bar weren't helping.

John

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I wouldn't say that a bent piece of metal is a spring. It depends on where the load is.

Get a piece of structural steel, support it at the ends, put a weight in the center and measure the deflection. Then, get that entire length of steel and roll it in to a complete ring or even an arch which is supported and put the same load on it, the deflection is going to be less. Because you are rolling in stresses, you are in fact, changing the modulus of elasticity. This is the very reason cold rolled steel is stronger than hot rolled steel, because you are rolling in stresses.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I wouldn't say that a bent piece of metal is a spring. It depends on where the load is.

Get a piece of structural steel, support it at the ends, put a weight in the center and measure the deflection. Then, get that entire length of steel and roll it in to a complete ring or even an arch which is supported and put the same load on it, the deflection is going to be less. Because you are rolling in stresses, you are in fact, changing the modulus of elasticity. This is the very reason cold rolled steel is stronger than hot rolled steel, because you are rolling in stresses.

Contrary to popular belief, the modulus of elasticity of steel is very much the same (within less than 5%) no matter what the alloy, or how it has been worked, heat treated, hardened etc.

In other words, mild (low carbon) steel is just as stiff as spring steel. Don't believe it? Pick up a machinery's handbook, google it, or click this link. http://www.engineersedge.com/manufacturing_spec/properties_of_metals_strength.htm

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.




×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.