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1972 Riviera M2 Build


02tom

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Thanks, I'm trying not to post too many "glamor shots". I've been jumping from one thing to another at this point - just whatever seems to be going well until I hit a stopping point. A lot of masking and painting on the floor and pedal box and brake booster. Bought a Harbor Freight set to installer the front bearing races and test fit the calipers after I saw a recent thread on the IE brakes. Going to leave the rear brake alone for awhile so I can still use the parking brake. Like I said, I'm jumping all over the place and have to while the weather is still cool.

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Edited by 02tom
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  • 1 month later...

Starting to piece things together.  I was going to do a rough install on the engine to see how things are going to go together, but got stopped short yesterday when the flywheel sensor was hitting the rectangular piece on the flywheel just behind the ring gear?  Not sure what is going on with that yet.  I found this picture on the internet, so I'm going to remove that transmission to see what mine measure out at.

 

Currently, I'm moving forward with the M3 Flywheel (lightened), M3 Clutch and a 25mm throwout bearing - I think it's for the 323i, but can't remember at the moment.  This is what happens when you order things years ago and don't write down adequate notes...

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Edited by 02tom
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On my flywheel, this rectangular piece of metal seems to stick out almost even with the teeth on the ring gear. I'm not sure what is normal on these, so I'll have to do some more digging. I've already explored the possibility of the sensor magnet being too long, but they're all the same.

Update: I've shimmed out both of the sensors as both were making contact - the more noticeable one being the lower one which wouldn't allow the engine to turn. Also pulled the old fuel line with old gas in it so I'm calling it a day and letting things air out.

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Edited by 02tom
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One other thing to slow down progress: my gas tank has surface rust on the top inside of the tank. Looks like I'm going to have to clean and seal it again... or maybe there's a better option out there? I bought an RCI fuel cell filler only to find out it's just a little too big to work with this tank. Couldn't find any dimensions anywhere online, but thought for $60 it had to be worth a try. It's close to fitting, but the tank curves upward and doesn't allow fuel filler to sit flat against the flat part of the tank. Possibly I could cut one edge and make it work with the tank where it curves upward, but I'm thinking it would be better to find one that fits in the space that is there because I don't want to increase the potential for leaking fuel.

Starting to look at the wiring and i like mlytle's method of using a false floor and putting the engine management equipment under it, but I also like Blunts wiring that has the battery cable going thru what appears to be a 2" ecu grommet. I'm thinking about doing both, but don't want two 2" holes in the firewall to use two separate ecu grommets, so we'll see which way this will go.

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Edited by 02tom
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Found some backing plates for the front brakes that are looking promising. Looks like one bolt hole to drill and utilize the 02 hardware, and add 2 washers. I guess I'll have to clean these up and get them ready for paint.

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Edited by 02tom
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flywheel..that thing is the trigger for the flywheel sensors.  my sensor is shimmed out to clear also.  btw, you only need one of the sensors.  if you trace the wiring for them, the other sensor just goes to the diagnostic plug.

 

fuel filter...neat idea.  how much "too tall" is it?  if not much, just "nuance" the bottom of the tank with a bfh to make more clearance.

 

brake backing plates...if are going to use the brakes in a sporting manner, i would delete the plates or at least cut them down so they only cover the inside of the hub bearing.  they block all the airflow to the inside of the rotor for cooling.

2xM3

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Marshall, thanks for the info.  I've seen the diagnostic plug left on some builds, but hadn't gotten that far in planning to know if I was going to strip off everything but the bare minimum of the wiring harness.

 

The problem with the fuel filler is the diameter of the clamp down area sitting on top of the tank is maybe 1/8 to 1/4" too big.  It's hard to say exactly looking at it, and being the RCI filler is powder coated, I may be better off going with a different one altogether.  The filler idea came from Blunt's build and the pictures of Steve's shows a filler with more gap around the circumference of the filler.  For the filter, I plan on putting a 3 series filter over the rear axle where the tii pump goes.

 

The backing plates are something that I've heard different theories on.  I don't plan on racing the car, though that could change I guess, but I've heard people say that you can warp rotors driving through standing water with hot rotors.  I'm not sure, but I would suspect that you would want a backing plate of some type with a "ram air" system to funnel air from the front of the car to the brakes directly for driving in a more sporting manner?  I guess I haven't looked too closely at this, but had been looking more at the concerns of the bootless design of the Wilwood front calipers. 

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my diag plug is in place, but all i use is for it the starter function.

 

lol...FILLER.  i read FILTER...nevermind....

 

i have never had a rotor warp nor heard of anyone else with rotors warping, for water or any other reason.  you would be fine with no backing plates.  for a street car though, cutting them way down so that air can get to the rotors, but leaving the center part to keep grime out of the back of the wheel bearings would be a good idea.

 

backing plates won't keep grime off the caliper pistons.

 

yes..for heavier brake use, cooling ducts, hoses and a specific mount to aim the air at the inside of the rotor hat is good.  i put details of how i did that in a separate thread and in my build thread.

Edited by mlytle

2xM3

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Starter function?  I guess I'll have to google that :)  I don't see ever taking the car into a mechanic and them hooking it up to a machine.  It might be hard to find someone who would even agree to look at it around here...

 

I thought you may have read filler.  I'm really bad about that ever since I started having to use reading glasses and I'm better off to no read / respond on a phone for that matter.

 

I've had many rotors warp and a variety of cars, though I think the usual reason for it is calipers sticking or the rotor being below it's minimum thickness.  I replaced the 320i rotors on my red tii last year because they were warped and it reminds me that I never thought to look for something being wrong with the calipers.  I do agree with you on keeping the center cups of the backing plates at least to potentially keep out dirt and dust.  There's not much back there to protect the inner bearings.

 

I used a 25mm throwout bearing to install the transmission - I believe this is the 323i one.  I had a brand new one in the yolk of the transmission over a year, so I don't think I would have order the m3 bearing.

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Edited by 02tom
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The are two positions in the diagnosis connector that you can jump together to turn the engine over.

Rotors do not warp very often. The symptoms usually attributed to warping are usually caused by uneven pad deposits.

Edited by mlytle

2xM3

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Thanks Marshall, I'm sure that info will come in handy at some point here.

Been going through the sub frame, steering column and struts and removing or painting over all the over spray from the paint work I had done years ago. It takes so much time to undo others mistakes it would have been so worth it if I would have been able to have been involved in the paintwork and prep years ago if I'd known they were just going to sprays the car without doing any masking that I could tell. I guess that's why the car was in the body shop for the 2nd restoration for 2 years....

I've also put on some new Eibachs to replace the gold Suspension Techniques that were a little to harsh for the roads around here.post-33739-14027045208167_thumb.jpg

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  • 3 weeks later...

Cleaning up around the front axle I found clogged drain holes, that were full of sand/dirt from sitting for years.  Picture shows some areas that are probably quite often neglected in the front wheel well.  I didn't get a good shot of the hole in front of the front strut, at the very top of the fender that looks like a good place to rust proof, and also the more obvious drain holes on the struts that get clogged up should also be looks at while you're in there, as they fill up before anything else and can cause your struts housing to fail prematurely.

 

In my case, it may have been a build up of dust from mowing the lawn, or from some cement expansion joint cutting years ago, but it was important to take care of it while I was thinking about it.  I unplugged them with some weed trimmer line and then blew them out with compressed air.  Similarly, I'm in the process of finding cleaning and rustproofing the frame rails and rockers before I get too much further along.  Once I get to the rear axle again, I'm sure I'll find places that need attention also.

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Edited by 02tom
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  • 2 weeks later...

Spent all day with with a face shield and respiratory protection on applying 3M's Rust Fighter 08891.  Okay, I spent a couple hours without the face shied and mask cleaning up when the wand pinched off the air flow and splattered everywhere.  It's easier to clean up when it's first applied because it's a product similar (I'd imagine) to Waxoyl.  It seems to have some petroleum distillates that evaporate causing the waxy material that's left to feel dry to the touch.  This is definitely not a job to cheap out on safety equipment!  As it does not come out of your hair very well...  Could have been much worse of course, as I certainly would not want this stuff in my eyes, though once I've combed my hair, I may not have to do it again for a month... 

 

Not having had a day off for awhile, I made the best of the day with the temperatures approaching 95.  I used the 3M applicator wand 08998, which sprays a 180 degree pattern in hard to reach places.  I would have liked the wand to be of a smaller diameter tubing, but after attempting to make an extension wand of my own, I realized how much engineering went into making theirs and ended up drilling out the rear drain holes on the frame rails to allow full access, as the wand is only about 3 feet long. 

 

I made pretty good progress on something that I didn't want to do too much farther along in putting the car back together.  I was able to treat the hood, trunk, rockers, frame rails, nose panel, front fender areas and the rear wheel arches (the hollow tube-like section that is accessible from the trunk without drilling any more holes).  Not sure what I can do to treat the rear wheel shock supports without drilling yet, though I'm making a list of things I'd like to treat so I don't miss anything.  Definitely going to treat the rear sub-frame and rear boxed trailing arms.  While I was able to get up the sides of the front windshield, I haven't been able to find a way in the C-pillars of the rear wind shield.  Hopefully after catching up on my rest and getting a couple more days off work, I'll get through the last of this messy chore.

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Edited by 02tom
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