Jump to content

Headliner installation


NullZwei

Recommended Posts

Can anyone tell me if the door gaskets, quarter windows and gaskets need to be removed to properly install a headliner? Hopefully just removing the pinch molding will do the trick but I wanted to check just to be sure. My car is at the body shop and will need the windshield and rear window removed to do some minor rust repair so I thought this may be the ideal time to do the headliner. However, if the above gaskets need to be removed, I'll probably pass as I don't want to risk the gaskets being damaged in the process.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

the front and rear windows are the biggies here, properly installed the headliner goes under these seals, so the time to do this is now, how often will u have the glass out to do it right?

Happy Trails to u~ Dave Miller
76 Golf~Rhiannon~BM Mascot~*~97 328is~Silver Ghost~*~68 1600~Wisperin Beast~*~70-02~Bumble Beast~*~76 02~Beast~

Keep smilin all the way

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Since the windshield and rear window will already be out, my biggest concern here was the door seals and quarter window seals. If either or both have to be removed, I didn't want to risk either but particularly the door seals being damaged in the process. The previous person that responded seemed to suggest that both needed to be removed for a successful installation. I don't have the car handy to check if it's possible or not. If anyone has installed a headliner without removing these seals, I'd like to hear how it went.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I did mine last summer, the door gaskets and rear vent wndows can be on the car. There's a lip the headliner folds around running past the door and side window and has pinch trim pushed over it. That lip runs all the way down to the rear base of the side vent window. I didn't take pics when we were doing it but just took these so you can see what I'm talking about.

IMG_6455.jpg

IMG_6448.jpg

IMG_6449.jpg

And the very rear of the headliner that runs along the top of the rear glass is different on different cars. Pretty sure its sun roof vs non-sunroof. Non sunroof has a metal lip the headliner wraps around, and with the sunroof the headliner gets covered by the glass gasket. My headliner wouldn't stay glued on the rear lip, so I used pinch trim to keep it in place.

IMG_6450.jpg

Front glass

IMG_6452.jpg

Hope that helps.

Scott

1976 2002 Custom Dk Blue w/ Pearl

1975 2002A Sahara (sold Feb 2008)

www.NorEast02ers.com

SiteNamecopy.jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

removing those seals isn't that big of a job- the door seals only have to be removed around the top, where they are held in place by a lip, you can leave them hanging where they are glued. they are a massive pain to put back in, until you get the hang of it, then you'll wonder why it was so much trouble before. the rear window seals are probably way easier if you remove the glass. i didn't when i replaced my headliner, and therefor frightened all of the neighborhood children screaming at it, while putting it back. the point is, i don't think you have to worry about damaging the seals, so much as preparing yourself for solving a frustrating puzzle, and honestly the window seals weren't the most frustrating piece of the headliner puzzle...

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

  • BMW Neue Klasse - a birth of a Sports Sedan

    BMW Neue Klasse - a birth of a Sports Sedan

    Unveiling of the Neue Klasse Unveiled in 1961, BMW 1500 sedan was a revolutionary concept at the outset of the '60s. No tail fins or chrome fountains. Instead, what you got was understated and elegant, in a modern sense, exciting to drive as nearly any sports car, and yet still comfortable for four.   The elegant little sedan was an instant sensation. In the 1500, BMW not only found the long-term solution to its dire business straits but, more importantly, created an entirely new
    History of the BMW 2002 and the 02 Series

    History of the BMW 2002 and the 02 Series

    In 1966, BMW was practically unknown in the US unless you were a touring motorcycle enthusiast or had seen an Isetta given away on a quiz show.  BMW’s sales in the US that year were just 1253 cars.  Then BMW 1600-2 came to America’s shores, tripling US sales to 4564 the following year, boosted by favorable articles in the Buff Books. Car and Driver called it “the best $2500 sedan anywhere.”  Road & Track’s road test was equally enthusiastic.  Then, BMW took a cue from American manufacturers,
    The BMW 2002 Production Run

    The BMW 2002 Production Run

    BMW 02 series are like the original Volkswagen Beetles in one way (besides both being German classic cars)—throughout their long production, they all essentially look alike—at least to the uninitiated:  small, boxy, rear-wheel drive, two-door sedan.  Aficionados know better.   Not only were there three other body styles—none, unfortunately, exported to the US—but there were some significant visual and mechanical changes over their eleven-year production run.   I’ve extracted t
  • Upcoming Events

×
×
  • Create New...