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JWadle

Spoilers

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I am restoring a '72 2002tii and want to know what front and rear spoilers (if any) were/are available from the factory or aftermarket for this car? The pics I have seen of front spoilers show removal of the front bumper. Do all spoilers require that?

Any information or pictures very much appreciated.

BTW - I have a set of original black front seats w/headrests in good condition. Free for pickup in Colorado.

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..... and from the left,

fitting a front spoiler will slow your car down!

spend your money time and effort on getting

the fuel inspritz linkage correct, the ignition timing

correct, the fuel delivery system correct

Happy New Year!

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LOL...like most folks who put on airdams (front) or spoilers (rear) care about performance vs. looks....;-)

they do add drag though...but nothing an S54 drop in won't fix!

happy new year!

:-)

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Air dams do slow a car down a bit due to increased drag but they also stabilize the car at speed by diverting the air from going under the car to going around the car. This creates negative pressure under the car and hunkers it down. The air dam I make (Kamei reproduction) has shown measurable increases in downforce at 80 MPH. It does not do much going straight at 80 but the increased stabilty in turms at that speed are significant.

A stock 2002 tops at 105-110 MAX. An airdam becomes mandatory if you have a turbo M10, an M20 or S14 or other high powered powerplants. These cars can hit 130+. The car gets floaty at that speed without an air dam.

The rear spoiler also adds drag. But it pushes down on the the rear of the car which adds to high speed stability too.

Reality: The majority of people put air dams and spoilers on their cars for cosmetic reasons. My tii has an IE front air dam. It looks good.

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A couple of real-world observations:

1) I regularly drive back-and-forth between my home in Nogales, AZ and Tucson on the freeway (65 miles). I usually drive between 85 and 90 mph. If you go slower than 85 you get passed by all kinds of cars. The posted speed limit is 75, but the state police are not concerned if you are not over 85 (the 10 mph over the speed limit is only a minor infraction and does not go on your insurance record). I have not had a ticket in over 20 yrs. Having said that I notice more stability in the car with a front spoiler whenever there is a cross-wind. My wife's '76 does not have a front spoiler and the difference at speed is significant.

2) When I installed the rear spoiler about 20 yrs. ago the first time we were on the freeway my son, my wife, and I all immediately noticed that it was quiteter in the car - less wind noise. Again, there is considerable difference between the noise in my car and my wife's car, which does not have a rear spoiler, at speeds of 70 mph and up.

Bob Napier

post-352-13667667899618_thumb.jpg

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Air dams do slow a car down a bit due to increased drag but they also stabilize the car at speed by diverting the air from going under the car to going around the car. This creates negative pressure under the car and hunkers it down. The air dam I make (Kamei reproduction) has shown measurable increases in downforce at 80 MPH. It does not do much going straight at 80 but the increased stabilty in turms at that speed are significant.

A stock 2002 tops at 105-110 MAX. An airdam becomes mandatory if you have a turbo M10, an M20 or S14 or other high powered powerplants. These cars can hit 130+. The car gets floaty at that speed without an air dam.

The rear spoiler also adds drag. But it pushes down on the the rear of the car which adds to high speed stability too.

Reality: The majority of people put air dams and spoilers on their cars for cosmetic reasons. My tii has an IE front air dam. It looks good.

I understand all the theory of air dams and spoilers, but would be interested to see any real data that the stuff commonly available for an 02 actually does anything besides look good and provide downforce equal to how much they weigh. :-)

An air dam really needs to be very close to the ground and have a flat plate below it that extends under the engine to be effective. The 2002 turbo lip spoiler on the trunk is pretty small and is way below the roof line in the turbulent air area. I am having a hard time believing it actually does anything.

My M2 regularly sees 120+mph on track. No air dam or trunk lip. Rock solid at that speed. Not floaty, not unstable in crosswind. I am adding an airdam mainly to redirect air to the radiator and to use the brake cooling ducts to cool the rotors...but always looking for things that might generate lower lap times!

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I understand all the theory of air dams and spoilers, but would be interested to see any real data that the stuff commonly available for an 02 actually does anything besides look good and provide downforce equal to how much they weigh. :-)

page 17

http://www.epa.gov/otaq///consumer/devices/pb83211243.pdf

from this thread

http://www.bmw2002faq.com/component/option,com_forum/Itemid,50/page,viewtopic/t,351066/view,previous/sid,dedd51d9201b4d96bcf597ffa9105ce8/

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That EPA study was done on stock 2002. A lowered car will show better improvements.

While I knew that the Kamei spoiler improved handling by directing air away from under car, I did not know that it actually reduced drag too.

And I should know, since I reproduce those darn things. Now I do.

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based on the article, maybe you could produce a second, different version of the kamei design....delete the center slot that decreases the effectiveness and add the brake ducts needed to offset the loss of under car air flow.

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