Jump to content
nickstulz

what to do when its time to paint the car

5 posts / 701 viewsLast Reply

Recommended Posts

so when its time to repaint what should one do for source and supply of paint?

what kinda paint is recommended for stock colors by you guys?

where should it come from?

has anybody tried the water born paints? whats the general consensus on such an endeavor.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Painting a car for the hobbyist these days is almost impossible. Paint is getting expensive (easily $500 a gallon) and requires special activators, catalysts, thinners, etc. to work correctly. The industry is now intensely controlled by environmental regulations. You need adequate facilities and equipment (a good spray gun and compressor is a must). I am painting the details (engine compartment, trunk, etc.) on my 2002 with Glasurit 22 Line paint before having a body shop do the body (I realize my limitations). Almost all brands of paint are capable of matching BMW OEM colors. Most body shops I have talked to haven't completely mastered waterborne paints, and I wouldn't even remotely consider them. And waterborne paints require specialized spray equipment to avoid rust. Go online and research autobody paint suppliers along with painting techniques. How you proceed depends on what level of quality/durability you are expecting.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Last year I used a water borne paint (DuPont Chromax Pro) for the first time. I would highly recommend it. Great for clean up and the two stage nature of the paint system is very forgiving if you make mistakes at either the basecoat or clear coat stages. Nothing like single stage paint, where you have only one chance to get it right.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

im leaning toward dupont, kinda thinking i might go satin/flatten it out. but i dont know. i love the shine i see on everybodys inka, but im thinking about changing it up a little.

the thing i wondering is the quality of paints, when i look at my e34 thats 20 years old and hasnt seen wax in 5 years, the paint is in fantastic shape. the same goes for most euro cars out there. it seems that the same cannot be said for american cars at all. so is it paint or is it how its applied that seems to leave the euros in the lead?

ive not painted a car since 1998, but i still have all the gear to get it done. so im just outta the loop on brand quality and new technology. ive done a bit of research. but id like to know what the rest of the 02 world is doing in this realm.

is it worth it to go to bmw for paint, is that even possible? does bmw just use dupont paint or something of the like?

i do figure its gonna cost me about a grand in paint supplies to get this all done. and thats fine so long as it keeps the car in my life for the next 40 years. and passed on to my daughter after that.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Glasurit (BASF) is the current BMW paint supplier--very high quality product. Using a two-stage process (with clear-coat) is the general recommendation, but I prefer a single stage paint (22 Line) which more closely matches the paint used on earlier cars (no clear coat). I have had no problems correcting defects or mistakes, if necessary. Good luck.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.




×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.