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jgerock

How do you remove stuck head bolts?

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The 71 engine I purchased had the head bolts still in the cylinder head after it was removed from the block. I was able to remove (2) of them after applying Liquid Wrench and using my impact gun, but the rest are really stuck (corroded) in the head. I have used a hammer and pointed chisel to beat on the bolts, but don't want to damage the head. I am going to try and drive the bolts back down then use a pick to scrape the crap from around the bolts.

Head is a '71 casting 121TI with 44mm intake valves

Any suggestions?

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Awww, that's nasty...

soak 'em and soak 'em some more.

Then heat the piss out of the BOLTS, let 'em cool some,

and soak 'em some more.

What, did they store it in a salt lake?

t

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What Toby said.

I'd wire brush the heck out of the exposed threads too. You could also beat on them with a dead blow hammer. Something that, if you miss and this the head, it won't scar.

If you are braver - turn the head upside down and beat on the bolts with a punch. But - if you slip off, could be bad.

Good Luck Jim. Let us know what happens!

Ken

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as an aside, make sure you pressure test the head after. mine were pretty crudded in too, and after i rebuilt the head, it let go after about 1/2 of run time. turns out all the crud/corosion was holding it together.

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I would take the head to the machine shop where it could be cleaned hot tanked and have the bolts removed by them if they are able with their techniques. Good luck !

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jgerock,

your plan sounds exactly like what I would do ..... I don't imagine the bolts are captive, so it's just crud holding 'em in.

Can you turn the bolt at all ?? Try turning and simultaneously "pounding" the bolt head back down against the engine head to loosen. Hopefully a back & forth will loosen sufficiently for removal. Plus crud removal of course.

Otherwise an auto shop hot tank soaking ??

Cheers,

Carl

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I don't think you want to hot tank an aluminum head in a caustic solution, there will be nothing left after a while. Here's an interesting article on cleaning aluminum heads:

http://www.enginebuildermag.com/Item/2225/aluminum_cleaning_a_small_shopx2019s_perspective.aspx

I like Toby's idea--soak with something like PB Blaster, then heat and cool the bolt to hopefully begin to break up the corrosion. You could hit the bolt with WD-40 or PB Blaster right after heating to cool it, or ice water, or some kind of refrigerant (liquid nitrogen?) for quick cooling.

Banging on the studs does not seem like a good idea, trying to turn them does. A shop could try a press--but first I would seek advice from a professional shop, perhaps one that does vintage car restorations that may have seen this type of thing before.

Fred '74tii & '69GT3

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Guest Anonymous

Heat the head in an oven or vat of hot water (dishwasher?) and then tap the bolts.

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Jim -

Have you gotten to work on it? Are they free?

Ken-

On one of my previous trips to NC, I dropped the head off at Ray Korman's place for inspection and testing. Talked to Ray himself. After 1 week, he called me and said they were only able to remove 3 more bolts after soaking the entire head, pounding on the bolts and trying their 1/2" pneumatic impact gun. Ray said since the bolts aren't even turning AND the intake valves are 44 mm, he recommended I scrap the head.

So - last week, I dropped off my 121 head from the 72tii engine (birdseed one) which has 46mm intake valves and no head bolts. Still waiting to hear back from them. I spoke with long-time employee Jimmy when switching the heads and he told me they have seen a bunch of engine parts that aren't usable - mostly due to the cracked and corroded cylinder heads.

BTW - check out this beauty parked at Ray's place. I love the color combination.

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IMG_8163.jpg

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Wow. Scrap it? I can't believe that the head bolts got so corroded in place that you can't break them free. But - I'd believe Ray. I got my 292 cam from them. Good people.

I have a really beat up 121 head in my garage. Some day I'm going to use it as a flower planter. Or a door stop. Or, build a stool out of it some how. It's seen way better days, so I figured why not.

WOW # 2. That's a high dollar car. The external oil tank filler tells me that's a 72, and if the rear deck is correct, a 72S in perfect condition! I had a buddy that sold a 71E that needed a complete engine and transmission reseal for about $40K, so I can only assume that a real S in that shape would command about $100. Plus - it's a 72 - that was the only year for the external oil filler.

Beautiful.

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I can't believe I didn't buy chrome bumpered 911's when they

were

'overpriced'

at something just under 10k.

t

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so I can only assume that a real S in that shape would command about $100.

Out of curiosity, I "followed" a '72 911S on German eBay a couple of weeks ago. It was a gorgeous blue car in fabulous (restored) condition. The bidding just kept going. The auction ended at the equivalent of approximately $140K...."reserve not met"!!!

Steve

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