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dtharp113

shift plate install - how involved/long does it take?

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need to refresh my shifter bushings, etc so I figured, while i'm in there... looking at the ireland 5 speed shift plate kit. for anyone that's done the install, about how long does this take (realizing MMMV)?

I'll be doing this on my back w/ the car jacked up. Unable to drop the transmission.

Can this be done in a day?

thanks,

Dennis

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In a day? That all depends. I took the touring apart in a day.

I can not remember if you can do that with the exhaust and driveshaft in place. That answer will dictate a lot of your time.

Do you know how to disassemble the shifter inside the car? That is not too bad, putting it back together usually causes me to want to say bad things. Plus if you have a stock shifter, now is the time to renew those bushes inside the shifter and the white nylon bushes.

If you can do this with the exhaust and driveshaft in place and you know how much time it takes you to disassemble the shifter inside the car, what you have left is to take the two blocks loose that secures the plate to the transmission, maybe a brace and separate the linkage from the shifter rod. It should all fall in your face by this time. And as they say, install is reverse of...

Having one of these and some 3/8" extensions help install the plate to the transmission.

ballallensocketfortranny.jpg

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I spoke w/ the guys at Ireland and it was suggested that dropping the driveshaft would make life easier.

More worried that I'm going to get 30% of the way in and discover there's a major problem staring me in the face.

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Well, if you drop the driveshaft, the major problem you'll have is re-compressing the guibo to put it back on or needing a new one ; )

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Well, if you drop the driveshaft, the major problem you'll have is re-compressing the guibo to put it back on or needing a new one ; )

Perhaps I'll talk w/ them again before placing the order .... and take better notes

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Just buy a new guibo, it'll come compressed, put it in when reassembling and then as a last step, pop the metal collar off it (of course don't forget to do that). if you want to reuse your old one, you can use a big hose clamp or two and you'll need a drill with a screwdriver bit or something like that to tighten it down with. If there are any cracks developing on the guibo in there now, just replace it and it's cheap insurance for later.

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I did it with the driveshaft in place, but I'm a glutton for punishment.

It's nowhere near impossible, but it will make the direct job in question (just the bushings) take longer. Whether or not it makes the overall operation take longer (dropping the driveshaft, doing the bushings, reinstalling the driveshaft) is probably debatable.

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Well, if you drop the driveshaft, the major problem you'll have is re-compressing the guibo to put it back on or needing a new one ; )

only if you have a 8 bolt guibo. 6 bolt ones don't have that issue.

even if you have an 8 bolt, with it still bolted to either the driveshaft or the tranny, it won't expand much and you can reassemble it.

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Uggh -- i just had a new guibo installed (months ago..) and I'm really trying to limit the scope creek.

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Take a look at Marshal's post above. You should be fine if you leave the guibo attached to either the tranny out-put flange or the drive shaft flange.

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Well, if you drop the driveshaft, the major problem you'll have is re-compressing the guibo to put it back on or needing a new one ; )

If your guibo is new(ish) get some large hose clamps (you might need to join 2 or 3 together) tighten them around the guibo BEFORE disassembly.

That keeps the compression on it until you are ready to re-install.

And remember to remove BEFORE the test drive - some FAQers have admitted to not removing the compression strap and wondering what the god awful noise was.

HTH Beaner7102

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No need to pull the DS if you just do a proper rebuild on the adapted stock platform.

The stock platform is a better design than the IE Piece. (Its based on the e21 platform and requires drilling a hole for the platform support.) Just get the bushings at the trans and a new support arm. Trim the support down using your existing piece as a template. And replicate the elogated hole for adjistment of the platform angle (to 3/4" down from the floor.) add a new foam insulation ring on top. The night before install, coat all the new rubber bits (3) with silicone to protect them from oil. This will slow/stop them from turning to gelatin.

In the end, you'll curse less, and save $, be done in half the time, and have a better performing product.

Also, see if you can get a new coupler for the selector shaft on the trans. As mentioned above, the wear in the bushings on the shift lever and the coupler are where the shifter slop are created.

Oh. And get some snap ring pliers at HF. It makes the shift lever removal/install a breeze.

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No need to pull the DS if you just do a proper rebuild on the adapted stock platform.{quote]

Well now, I'm intrigued... so if I read this correctly, I can use the existing shifter platform and just replace/refresh the bushings/linkages, etc? The only reason I'm looking at doing this is I'm having a difficult time (at times) getting into reverse and 1st - and the shift lever has a lot of play in it.

If I don't have to replace the shift platform, well, I'd rather not...

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As Jason indicates, the platform should have nothing to do with sloppy shifting. The bushing blocks that hold the platform to the transmission and the bushings in the shifter including the 2 nylon cups should fix that.

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