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kimerpof

Fuel system help!

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So i recently got a 1973 2002 and it needed the carb rebuilt. So ive spent the past month trying to figure it out, after thinking it through ive decided to just buy a new carburetor and start fresh. The carb it came with is a weber 32/36 DGAV water choke. while trying to fix it i noticed i didnt have very much fuel going to the carb! could this be the fault of my carb? or my fuel pump? One thing i want to know is should i replace my carb with a water choke or get a electric choke? also i wanted to upgrade the fuel system to a electric pump instead of a mechanical pump. can anyone lead me in the right direction on how to get started with this? any answer to any of my questions will be great help! i am new at working on cars and took on this project as a learning experience to greater my knowledge on cars! thank for the help!

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i didn't see in any of your other threads on the same issue whether you had a shop manual or weber carb book. if you don't have these basic tools, you need to get them. if you want to learn about working on cars, you have to do a little studying of the background material and learn where to find information. just a suggestion.

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I have a haynes repair manual but not a weber manual. im mostly just looking to buy a new carb instead of fix the old one since its missing a few pieces. i just dont know where to start :(

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Electric is a lot easier to deal with. Ours has that and it works fine. You can convert to electric by looping the water back into the manifold (just remove the hose and run a hose between the in/out, bypassing the whole mess).

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It's the same power as for the idle cut solenoids, which you already have there. Key on = power (fuel and choke working), key off = no power (no fuel, no choke)

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works every time and is one less thing to go wrong. You can get a choke cable from an earlier car and hook it up so that it looks stock. Your '73 has a hole in the firewall for the cable, plugged with a rubber grommet.

But before you write off your old carb, try rebuilding it--get a gasket set and possibly an accelerator pump diaphragm and go for it. Not difficult, it'll be a learning experience and you can always buy a new carb if the rebuild doesn't work. I used the same Weber 32-36 for thirty years before finally buying a new one.

cheers

mike

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If you go with a new one, be aware that you can't just take it out of the box and install it and expect it to be set up properly for your car. You need to take it apart before installing to determine your jet sizes inside, your idle jet sizes, and emulsion tube sizes. Then once on the car you need to "tune" the high and low idle circuits and make sure the choke is working properly (assuming either water or electric automatic choke).

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You can buy a Weber 32/36 from any Weber dealer brand new. It's only $200, which is a pretty darn good deal for something that will just work.

http://www.webercarbsdirect.com/32_36_DGEV_p/22680.033b.htm

NO, just say no to fake webers..... http://genuineweber.blogspot.com/

Real webers are imported by Redline (a subsidiary of worldpac).

If you go with a new one, be aware that you can't just take it out of the box and install it and expect it to be set up properly for your car. You need to take it apart before installing to determine your jet sizes inside, your idle jet sizes, and emulsion tube sizes. Then once on the car you need to "tune" the high and low idle circuits and make sure the choke is working properly (assuming either water or electric automatic choke).

This is one reason why some charge a bit more (like IE or TopEnd), because they will jet it to your prescription (elevation/cam/comp./etc.) when you call. That, and they both are listing redline/webers. Every engine is a bit different so no tune given over the internet/phone will be perfect, it's going to take someone who is experienced in tuning these carbs to get things fine-tuned.

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Wow, thanks for pointing that out, I had no idea about the modern Weber manufacturing mess. Well, certainly you want to avoid a China-made carb if you can. Sorry for the bad advice there!

That said, these things are just not "precision" equipment and never really were despite what people would like to believe. Weber carburetors, like most carburetors, are basically disposable junk. They were (and I imagine continue to be) made from pot metal crap, the throttle shaft bushings will fail eventually, the hardware is shit, and with the 32/36 design, there's just not much to it in general and not much "tuning" or "recipe" that you need to waste much time with. I'm all for buying one that's more or less "set up" for the M10 motor but really if you have the right idle jet size you'll probably be alright. You could always swap the jets from your old carb if you wanted to be sure.

Anyway, I would rebuild the carburetor if you're up for it (it sounded like you didn't want to do that or otherwise aren't up for it), otherwise swap it out for a new one (maybe do spend more money on a Spain-made one, maybe set up properly to boot) and toss the old one, the throttle shafts are probably leaking anyway and the float bowls are likely filled with disgusting Ethanol-generated white crap.

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I have a Spanish- made DCOE that's proof that

'genuine Weber'

isn't worth getting your knickers in a twist about.

Megasquirt for me, baby.

t

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I installed an electric fuel pump when I changed heads to a 1.8i version as part of larger engine rebuild project. Truthfully, it is more trouble than it is worth. It's noisy (Carter pump), requires new wiring, a Bosch style relay, fuel cutoff switch and fuse. None of this is rocket science or difficult, but more complexity than it is worth (IMHO) if you have a working mechanical pump. In some cases, simple is good. I think this is one of them.

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