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Eliminating Trim


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Guest Anonymous

URL: http://photos.yahoo.com/imprezsti2000

I plan to eliminate the lower trim on a 74 02 I have removed it no problem next up is filling the holes my plan of attack was 2 plys of fiberglass behind the holes and use a high temp filler in the holes. I would assume this is a safe method? I figure I would check. I have used fillers on glass and carbon often in the past but long term use on metal I have not.

Thanks for any and all help

John

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Guest Anonymous

actually is probably a better method than what we did (plug weld), which created a lot of bodywork. As long as the bondo is isolated from humidity from inside it won't bubble later.

have fun

Michael

72 tii

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Guest Anonymous

I used to do this all the time de-badging trucks. Sand the paint off the front and back of the hole, as well as IN the hole. You want a good, abrasive surface for good ahesion.

Dig in your back seat or go panhandling for some spare change. Use part of it to buy JB Weld, and make sure you save some.

Mix a platter of JB Weld, and scoop some onto a coin, then stick it to the rear of the panel, squishing the goo through the hole on the outside.

When its dry, hit it with a grinder or a 400 disc.

The problem with the fiberglass/bondo route is the expansion properties of the two materials compared to metal. In extreme heat or cold, you may crack bondo or lose adhesion with fiberglass. Fiberglass and bondo were not made as filler for holes.

Welding is indeed the best way. But the problem with welding is the thin mature of the metal you are working with. I am an experienced welder with a good rig, and I hate sheetmetal. It seems like if you don't warp it welding you might warp it grinding.

I have done the JB route to countless trucks I have de badged, it never cracked out even in the extreme KS weather. Plus it increases the value of your car slightly.

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Guest Anonymous

little bits of flux will remain and mess up the paint. MIG is easier, lower heat and no flux to clean up. Do it right, do it once. Do it wrong (i.e. bondo, fiberglass etc), and you'll end up doing it twice...

Cheers

Mike

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Guest Anonymous

This seems more common on the hood than on the body proper, because the hood edge is formed as a fold in the metal, and water can get to the inside of it.

Mike

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