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Brake line suggestions!


Guest Anonymous
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Guest Anonymous

I am going to rerun all the brake lines on the project car when hte body is done. I want to use stainless, however I hear it is a PITA to flair. Couple questions:

1. Is there anyone who makes pre-bent lines for the 2002? Stainless or plain steel?

2. What line size should I use? 3/16"? (what comes on the car to begin with?)

3. Should I use 45 or 37 degree flair fittings, I've read that the 37 degree ones are stronger... but I assume cars always use 45?

4. Anyone know of a cheap flairing tool that could do this size stainless? I just have a couple of them to make!

5. Where can I find regular ss brake tubing? I was looking at McMaster, and they do have 3/16" and 1/4" with working pressure ratings that are quite acceptable, is this the wrong way to go?

I have found stainless braided hose lines, just no hard lines.

Thanks,

-Patrick

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Guest Anonymous

Unless you are going to make custom hoses, put custom adapters on the master cylinder, etc., you must reproduce the orginal fitting style. This is known as a 'bubble flare' or 'metric flare'. You can find tools for creating a bubble flair in many auto supply catalogs, like Pegasus Racing, maybe even JC Whitney. I've seen tools go for about $50. Bubble flare tools are more expensive than single-flare (like fuel lines) or double flare (like US brake lines) because there is a punch and die that you must use to form the end of the tubing.

You can get away with 3/16" tubing. There's a place that will supply stainless tubing, I think it's called Classic Tube, and yes, it's more brittle and therefore difficult to terminate than plain steel. I've called around about prebent tubes for 2002, and they're not easy to find. Generally they're custom made.

Mike

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Guest Anonymous

about the bubble flair and when I ran new lines in the engine bay, I use double flare metric tool. It may not be right but it seems to be working.

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Guest Anonymous

from BMW that were fabricated with the ends, just had to bend to shape. Brain fart too many old cars and trucks here. Trying to resist an 82 Toyota Land Crusier in cherry shape.

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Guest Anonymous

Having this same issue with my '67 2000ti. I got a bubble flaring tool from eBay for $50. I will be using 3/16" steel brake lines with much cursing. Brakes are too important to compromise. (How much is a new front end worth these days?)

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Guest Anonymous

if it flexes, it will harden, crystallize, and become brittle. Then it can crack. The Brits swear by it, and in the US, it's not DOT approved. And the engineers I know that work on cars don't want to hear about it.

How about copper- plated steel? It's readily available, (whitney's) and flares pretty easily...

t

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