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RoccoGilroy

M3 e30 Pressure Plate/Disc Whos using it?

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Iv been shopping around for clutches for a long time now and iv read every thread at least 10x. Id like to know who is using the stock SACHS M3 e30 clutch pressure plate and or disc and what are your experiences? The SACHS M3 E30 SPORT pressure plate is bad ass but for the price of the pressure plate I can buy a hole clutch kit. So I really want to hear how the stock M3 E30 Pressure Plate and or clutch disc have worked for folks.

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Going to need a lot more info from you. What is the intended purpose of your car street/track? How much Horsepower?

Have you been able to look at the plate and see the differences?

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I purposefully didnt put any info about my motor. I want to hear what people had to say about this particular set up. Maybe you can tell me which pressure plate Ireland sells as their,

228MM CLUTCH PRESSURE PLATE - SPORT/HEAVY DUTY.

Is it an e30, e30 m3, 325, 2002 sport?

Mostly a street car but I want it set up on the edge of crazy. Im shooting for 150hp at the wheels ish... JB aluminum flywheel and 5 speed.

Thanks Andrew!

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Your proposed set up is far from the edge of crazy.......150hp its tame and well within the capability of stock m10 clutch. S14 clutch waste of money......

if you are building a track car and want that extra tenth of a second off laptimes, the jb racing flywheel and a kevlar clutch will make shifting more presise.

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I like to do dough nuts and burn outs and my current clutch slips with a 32/36 1600 motor. I go through this every time I ask. Thats why I dont tell people what im planning to run under the hood.

For $275 ish I can get a 2002 clutch kit. For $350 I can have an e30 m3 clutch kit. WHY WOULDNT I???? Over kill, MAYBE... My question was not "what clutch kit does everyone think I should run?" I just want to get some feedback from those running the e30 m3 clutch kit and how they like it. Any issues????

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Don't know how it is yet but I have an e30 325i clutch with a 323i to bearing on an aluminum flywheel. If it can hold the torque and weight of that car it's sure to hold the expected 180 from my motor in my o2.

John

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stock e30 325i clutches are somewhere north of 200, I want to say 210tq holding capacity. You could save yourself some money and just buy an E30 clutch kit then either get the e21 323i TO bearing or jb weld two 5mm thick pieces onto the e30 TO bearing back side. That's what probably I'm doing, though I may weld a spacer onto the clutch arm, haven't decided yet. I'll post a pic either way.

If yours is slipping it doesn't necessarily mean the clutch sucks. It could have been broken in improperly, could be old, could be an asian brand disc, pressure plate could be really old(ie, person just replaced the disc instead of the kit), flywheel maybe wasn't surfaced before putting a new one in, or you could be a "clutch rider". My aunt does that and ends up having to replace her clutch every 3-4 years...

Really, be honest, you just want an M3 clutch to say you have an M3 clutch ;) Nothing wrong with that necessarily. If the clutch kits were with in $10 or 20 of each other, why not go for it? But $70 is a bit much for something you won't need.

BTW, I'm also shooting for 150hp after MSII/everything else I'm doing. I'm using a 228mm aluminum flywheel, 2002 228mm sachs clutch kit, and e30 sachs TO bearing. All the E30/E21 5spd TO bearings are the same height, just the M20 cars used 228mm clutch while the M10 cars used 215's and the pressure plates are about 5mm difference in height. I haven't measured it but I believe the M20 cars made up the 5mm difference in flywheel thickness.

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I'm in the same boat; need a clutch kit for the new engine, want the m3 p.p. but dont want to spend a fortune. After driving two 2002's with the m3 p.p., i'm hooked. I prefer the heavier pedal feel that it provides. It's 'snappier' because of the increased clamping force. That's my primary reason for wanting one. The problem is the price.

Now i'm wondering if the e30 228mm p.p.(from a 325i) will have that heavy feel when installed in a 2002. Also, are you guys using 5 speed trannies?

good luck and thanks,

bob

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Perfect! This is the discussion I was hoping to have! I have never driven an 02 with the e30 pp and it's great to hear peoples experiences. I have always felt that the clutch was a bit soft so its good to hear that it stiffens up with the change. Thanks for the info guys! It sounds like $70 well spent. Stiffer pedal pressure and crisper shifts. Sign me up!

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Im running the e30m3 pp and clutch with an 8lb flywheel. I wouldnt say its got a firmer pedal than a stock 02. Its fine though. But as said unless youre running bigger power its not needed

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I use a M3 "non-Sport" Pressure Plate PN: 21-21-2-226-505 from Ireland and their 228mm solid center Racing Clutch Disc. Works fine for me on the track, clutch engagement is nice and positive. Probably would not want solid center for street use. I believe the M3 "Sport" Pressure Plate PN is 21-21-2-226-847. Did not see need for that, as non-sport should easily handle 230 HP (according to IE). Next year will add JB alum flywheel.

Fred '74tii

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if you use an E30 M3 flywheel (228mm), clutch, and PP...do you need an E21 323i TO bearing, or can you use the E30 M3 TO bearing?

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(edited)

Most guys with big torque in Germany use 324td (yes diesel) discs (also used in the 325e) #21 21 1 223 678 an M3 pressure plate and the throwout bearing from e21 323i

Edited by uai

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(edited)

Just as an unfortunate update, the M3 pressure plate we were referring to no longer exists.  Sachs/bmw sold out about four years ago and superceeded the number with the standard 325i pressure plate.  It also works fine, but it doesn’t have quite the same holding power (around 25%ish if I recall correctly).

 

thanks for bumping an original thread instead of starting a new one.

 

as for the question, I KNOW the 323i tob would work, I don’t know about the m3 tob though.

Edited by AceAndrew

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(edited)

This thread was talking about exactly what I wanted to know and I knew if I bumped it, it would probably notify most of you.

 

I find there are more kit options with 228mm flywheel if I’m buying for the E30 or E30 M3. So I’m wondering if I bought a single mass flywheel + clutch + PP for either an E30 or M3 if I’d still need the E21 TO bearing. I’m assuming yes, from what I’ve read here. And it sounds like the reason is because the M20/S14 flywheel is thinner than the original G240 stack up was built for, so the E21 TO beading is longer to increase PP engagement. Is that the best way to put it or do I have it backwards somewhere?

Edited by mmbingo

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