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mlytle

13NOV drive anyone?

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I am going to be on a plane all day... Can't complain since I am going to Puerto Rico to sail a boat back to Florida...

Have Fun!!! I want to smell the rubber burning 5 miles in the sky!

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1100 miles in hopefully 7 to 10 days. I get to sail past the entire northern carribean, so hopefully I'm not bored.

I think the drive looks like a good one.

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Great day for some driving in Southern Maryland.

Marshall & I started out then were joined by Bill Riblett in his Vette.

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Across the Potomac you can barely make out the George Washington Parkway

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Marshall's short-cut on a dirt road

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Here we are at Fort Washington

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One of these cannons could shoot a 700 lb. shot about 9 miles!

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You can see the Woodrow Wilson Bridge beyond the fort.

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Some of the Officer's Quarters

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Jim and i headed down to Marshall Hall for pics. beautiful day and location. then we met up with bill r at accoteek and drove up to ft washington...the 2002 "old maryland national park" tour. here are some bad pics...

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found a couple of nice locations for future ISRCG outings....

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Thanks for the pics of what I missed while I went to every other Piscataway Park in Southern Maryland!

Beautiful day, but all the colorful leaves are raining down.

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Made it back to land. Our route ended up being about 1000 miles and we did the journey in 159 hours. We used 28 gallons of diesel, 24 of which were used purely to generate electricity for the boat. After leaving Boqueron, PR we did not use the motor until we entered Port Everglades in Ft. Lauderdale. Better yet, we stayed on the same tack the entire trip. We had at least two sails up the entire sail, only swapping out or reefing the sails for squalls. We had an average speed of nearly 6 knots, maxing out at 11.4 while in the Gulf Stream. Only had brief 10 minute rain showers and squalls during the nights, and only one or two per night. Other than that, sunny skies and a steady 15 to 20 knot wind ENE the entire trip. And the seas were 6 to 8 ft (12 to 16 ft top to bottom of the wave) except in the Gulf Stream where they were about 10 ft.

To those of you who have no idea the scale of this trip... Sailing from North America to Europe is typically done with the longest leg being 650 miles.

So all is well and I am happy to be spending thanksgiving with the whole family.

Marshall- I would personally like to thank you and all of the people serving in the US Coast Guard. You ( they) made us feel very comfortable while sailing. We saw the USCG 4 out of the 7 days, and were hailed once. We believe that we were a training vessel for the crew aboard ship 908 since they spent about 4 hours practicing approaches to our boat. Very polite on the radio. When I get back to a computer instead of a cell phone, I can elaborate on my gratitude.

That said, I am most pleased that we didn't have to hail the USCG.

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sounds like it was a great transit!

thanks for the comments. what is the name of your boat? I can pass some positive feedback to the Captain of the CG Cutter (908, one of our 270ft ships).

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Marshall -

That name of my Mom's boat is 'Anhinga'... but admittedly the CG Cutter 908 read it as 'Antigua'... Honest mistake since the paint on the hull has faded after a few years in the Carribean. One of many reasons my parents decided to sail back to the states.

This is my parents most recent blog entry about the sail from Puerto Rico:

http://svanhinga.blogspot.com/2011/11/november-15-22-2011-long-passage-home.html

And my Mom wanted to make sure that you recognize these folks as well:

http://svanhinga.blogspot.com/2011/03/march-11-22-2011-christiansted-st-croix.html

Sailing in to a well-kept, well-marked channel at night is so much kinder on the nerves than trying to do the same in a place where the markers and pilings are in shambles or not to be found. Just as much gratitude should be given to the men and women who maintain the markers and pilings as those aboard the big, fancy ships and helicopters!

(Boy, looking at the last picture in the most recent post, I'm kind of embarrassed to display such a sad American flag... We have already raised a new one and given the old one a proper farewell)

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Jim-

I finally got to use an actual computer and the pictures of your guys drive are amazing! Definitely worth a repeat later with more members of the ISRCG!

And I should take no credit for anything on the blog other than suggesting the idea to my parents to keep one. All of the content is credited to the two of them.

My step dad thinks of himself as an amateur photographer (he was once published in a sailing magazine and you would think it was the most important thing he ever accomplished). So, most of the photos on the blog are from his eye and possibly coaxed a bit with Photoshop.

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