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dual pipes???


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Guest Anonymous

Has anyone messed around with dual pipes? I was thinking the other day... how the stock exhaust manifold works. And, it works exactly how my new lynx sidedraft manifold should work... it keeps 1 and 3 together and 2 and 4 together, to use the firing order to maximize smooth power. (from what I read). Anyway, the exhaust does the exact same thing to an extent, until the pipes come together in the y after the manifold. I was wondering... if you ran 2 pipes, just like the manifold comes out, all the way back, would you see better performance? Even better, if you could make the 2 pipes bend in such a way, that the total length of each exhaust 'system' (1+3 and 2+4) then would you get a header type effect? It would be cool to run these 2 exhausts right out in front of the rear wheels, out the side of the car. Also, this set up would all you to run one pipe slightly shorter, to get the total length the same.

Also, has anyone ran strait pipes? I assume it's best to go through atleast a small silencer box to keep things reasonable. I have a feeling my exhaust is going to need replacing soon, so I'm trying to figure out what I'll do... (cheaply with decent street performance/sound)

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Guest Anonymous

I am a mechanical engineer.. I've put some though into this in the past. From what I understand, the turbulance generated by separating the two sets of cylinders would slow down the gas going through it. Bigger isn't always better. You have more surface and more surface turbulance.

Also notice that there is no production performance cars that use dual pipes.

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Guest Anonymous

there are quite a few (American especially) performance cars that come with dual exhaust. I dont know if the reasons they use dual exhaust would be the same reasons and 02 would use dual exhaust. Maybe each exhaust pipes goes through a silencer box to give the motor a little more back pressure. But still, I'm basing this on the fact that both the stock exhaust manifold and the lynx sidedraft use this firing order to get better performance. I'm thinking why not continue this all the way back, thus making each 2 cylinders on there own system, with nothing related to the other system, ie no shared pipes or areas where they mix.

I dono though, I'm just thinking, not basing it on much of any understanding of how all this works.

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Guest Anonymous

Ok the manifold. It splits into two and then down into one. If you were for example building a header that used like a tri y header from bmp and just didn't put on the back section of pipe from the tri y pipes. Well the reason they do that is to keep the pulses to scavenge each other. That's the benifit. If you ran a dual system I don't think you'd see a whole lot and since they vent the the atmosphere there would be no reason to match the exhaust pipes. As for straight pipes a pure straight on is pretty loud but not "terrible". I don't think most street motors will benifit by it.. and race motors would need high RPM's to benifit from it.

Party On

Kris

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Guest Anonymous

strait pipes? Cause I'll be basically looking for a budget exhaust with decent performance. If I can save money by just having a single or double strait exhaust kit made up, and get the same or better then stock performance, I'd be happy. I dont need it to be super quite or anything, but I dont want it to sound like a blown ricer or something.

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Guest Anonymous

My straight pipe exhaust you could hear from about 2 turns from my house... aka half a mile... way to loud for the street. If you want a nice street car get a sebring exhaust from rob t at 2002 haus. I've got it on my street car and it sounds nice. Not super loud but "spoorty" definitly not fart can ricer pipe. If it's a racer.. take a header straight out the back and put a cherry bomb in the middle. That'll sound good.

Kris

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Guest Anonymous

are V8s or at least V6s, so you're right back to 4 cylinders into one pipe. V8 dual exhauset systems almost always have a crossover somewhere not far downstream of the header collectors or downpipes - if I remember correctly, the crossover's main function is to enhance low end torque a bit without significant negative impact on high rpm power. Crossovers also help smooth out the exhaust note - my 65 El Camino (350 4 bbl) had duals without a crossover when I got it, and it sounded like a old inboard powerboat at idle.

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Guest Anonymous

back into 2 lines, then a CAT for each line (hidden under the rattling heatsheild if still the factory setup)then into another x-piece, then 2 pipes into the rear muffler. Can't vouch for what goes on inside there, then 2 tips out. the finishing touch is a garnish of chrome tips tastefully done.

Steve J

72 tii Verona

88 M3 Hennarot

(gotta stop watching those cooking shows)

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