Jump to content

One step closer to EFI...


Guest Anonymous
 Share

Recommended Posts

Guest Anonymous

megalaboratory94.JPG

URL: http://www.zeebuck.com/02bc/index.htm

Just thought I would share some of my joy...

I'm stoked! My EFI conversion project has reached an important milestone tonight - the first running of the Megasquirt DIY EFI computer has successfully taken place!

Above is a pic of the great moment (well, great for me, anyway).

The oscilloscope trace in the background is showing the Megasquirt's "heartbeat"' - the 32Khz clock signal. The laptop's screen is showing the

engine sensor values from the Megasquirt in realtime. Most are just random values 'cause there are no sensors connected yet, but the critical MAP

(manifold absolute pressure) sensor is working. The syringe in the foreground is for applying pressure or vaccuum to the sensor for testing.

I am especially pleased it did not go up in smoke or otherwise malfunction since I just went ahead and assembled the whole circuit rather than build one section and test, build another and test - which would have been the prudent method. ;-)

The next phase of the project will be creating the wiring harness, assembling the intake parts and then bench-testing the complete injection system (using paint thinner instead of gasoline, probably). That way I can also check the injector spray patterns, measure flows, and make sure they don't leak as well as make sure my used pump and regulator are OK before installation. Not sure when all that will happen, though.

For fun, here is a pic of my electronics workbench area. The actual "working area" is always **just** larger than the item being worked on. http://www.zeebuck.com/bimmers/tech/Megasquirt/megalaboratory95.JPG

One day, I will clear it off and organize all the stuff... one day...

clean... stuff... auagghhhghh.

regards,

Zenon

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest Anonymous

image006.jpg

URL: http://www.hbci.com/~tskwiot/2002.html

Now that you have a running board, you'll really feel the pressure to get it installed. My EFI project seemed more of a theoretical possibility to me -- until I had a running ecu. Then the motivation really started building to get it on the car!

I see you're a man of your word - I like the big can of contact cleaner front and center on your shelf above the bench!

good luck

Tim

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest Anonymous

britannia97.JPG

URL: http://www.zeebuck.com/02bc/index.htm

The Eico was a garage sale find, $10 or so. It works OK and I sometimes use it on "toob" equipment (it is harder to destroy with high voltage), but the one I use for most stuff is that little solid state Telequipment unit - that was free, plucked from the curbside during a "spring cleanup" week! I mostly just keep the Eico for sentimental reasons and because it looks really cool on the bench. I'm on the lookout for a clean Tek 465 or something, but I would "settle" for a modern digital scope if it was dirt cheap.

The laptop was a $10 garage sale find, too. Bought it from somebody's ex. ;-)

regards,

Zenon

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest Anonymous

britannia97.JPG

URL: http://www.zeebuck.com/02bc/index.htm

myself into actually getting this pipe dream realized sometime this spring. Tim's right about what happens when the ECU is finally alive on the workbench - the whole project becomes "real" at that point. Thanks for adding to the momentum, guys!

For those who enjoyed the pics... that is just the workebench, the rest of the 9x12 room is packed to the ceiling with car parts, electronic junk, and I am sure Jimmy Hoffa is in there somewhere.

regards,

Zenon

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest Anonymous

way to go Zenon! I'm paused mid-stride on my Megasquirt project due to the U.S. infernal revenue service tax deadline.

you are certainly a brave little monkey to build the entire board without doing any testing.

what is contact cleaner used for? i'm clueless when it comes to electronics.

a friend of mine helped me build a throttle body adapter for the 318i/5.0 mustang interface. it turns out that the rectangle of the 318i intake is just about the same open area as the 58mm mustang throttle body. that's a happy little coincidence don't ya think?

-ben

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest Anonymous

picnicvintage08.jpg

URL: http://www.zeebuck.com/02bc/index.htm

However, I was extra-super-anal-retentive about the component placement and soldering (even applying extra flux to every joint with a syringe) and spent about three times longer than I really had to to populate the boards. I did find it all highly enjoyable, though.

Sorry to hear that "The Man" has you down. I am sure you will get the MS project back on track - maybe you can do a special IRS benefit concert with ol' Willie to raise some funds? ;-)

I haven't procured a mustang TB yet so was not aware of the nice coincidence of sizing - that is most convenient! I was thinking of just going with the smallish 318i TB and adapting a TPS at first, but now I am thinking I may as well do the job right the first time and before the car depends on the EFI. What years/models mustang had these 58mm TBs?

There are two basic flavours of contact cleaners.

Zero residue contact cleaner (without lubricant) is used for cleaning electrical contacts in things like switches, connectors, etc. and often any other sort of electrical assembly. It removes various greases, soils and oxidation and evaporates with almost no residue. Used to be mostly Trichloroflourocarbon based, but now is something else that won't punch as big a hole in the ozone.

Control Cleaner is as above but with a lubricant added and is used on things like potentiometers (eg, the volume control on your stereo), where it is desirable to have some lubrication of the moving parts left behind. If you have a scratchy sounding control on some audio equipment, this is the stuff. It may not be suitable for high voltage or high power equipment because of the lubricant residue, but I have found that you can really use this on almost anything automotive. Even a spade connector can benefit from lubrication since it helps prevent corrosion and micro fretting abrasion of the contact surfaces that are in a high vibration environment. Shooting a little into an underhood connector is like a little insurance policy.

More info here:

http://www.caig.com/index2.htm

And Here:

http://www.mgchemicals.com/products/cleandegr.html

regards,

Zenon

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

  • Upcoming Events

×
×
  • Create New...