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Need help with overheating problem....


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Guest Anonymous

I'm going nuts trying to solve an overheating problem in my car.

It has :

-good water pump

-good 81 deg thermostat

-new engine fan

-new electric fan

-three core radiator

And the darn car still overheats badly in traffic! Last Sunday I went out on a drive and it worked OK until I hit a small traffic jam on the way back. Slowly but surely the temp rose until I had to stop and turn off the car. After waiting for it to cool off I turned back and took an alternate route to get home.

Any suggestions? A friend suggested that the head gasket might be shot and that would cause overheating.

TIA,

HarryPR

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Guest Anonymous

to make sure. They are available for anywhere from $15-$30 and it will tell you for sure if you a pumping hot-gas into the cooling system.

The bad news is: it will only tell you that you have leak. It won't tel you if it is a cracked head or head gasket.

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Guest Anonymous

You will be helped by going to a 71 deg thermostat, but 1st you might want to pressure test the system @ the radiador.That Will indicate if you've a leak. Next possibility is a clogged passageway somewhere in the path of the coolant. Good luck.

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Guest Anonymous

I have a spare head at home which I will check to make sure it is OK. Who knows, I might wait and get it modded and add a mild cam just for kicks!

BTW, the problem has been going on for some time. Is there a possibility of additional damage?

Thanks,

Harry

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Guest Anonymous

Make sure your concentration of antifreeze isn't too high. AF is not as good as water at pulling heat out of an engine. I used to be able to tell how much AF the shop put in my car just by how hot it ran on the way home... :-)

I ran about 35% (and not 50/50) when I was in California. I also had a 71 TS with a 2-core rad back then. Never had a problem even in hot weather with stop and go traffic. I put ~ 100,000 miles that way from 1983 to 1988. Now that I am in Seattle, I have the other problem... I need to make my car run warmer. Oh well...

For you-

Going to a lower AF concentration with a 71 TS should work.

YMMV (as usual...)

Good luck-

Kevin

1973 2002

Seattle

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Guest Anonymous

Harry,

Some good suggestions by the others.

Without a radiator cap that is holding pressure in the system the car will want to run hotter than it's supposed to. We uauslly run the 71 degree t-stats here in Calif. sunshine.gif

Check the simple things first.sunglassescheck.gif

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Guest Anonymous

britannia97.JPG

URL: http://www.zeebuck.com/02bc/index.htm

items like the heater fan or headlights are switched on? Bad grounds between the engine and chassis will make the temp gauge read high as current flows between the battery and alternator.

I had suffered with this faux-overheat issue for years and it often behaved like a true overheat - rising temp gauge at idle, then slowly dropping as rpm increases (as the battery charges after being drained a bit at idle).

The big clue is any quick movements of the gauge as electrical loads are switched on and off. Cleaning the original grounds and even adding a ground wire to the gauge cluster were no help.

I finally solved the problem with a nice thick new ground wire to a front strut stud. The original battery tray ground point was NFG from corrosion between the tray and the body (on a '73 with bolted-in tray).

Just something else to think about since it sure seems like your cooling system is fine and a head gasket leak is not a very likely cause if the engine otherwise runs fine, IMO. A leaking headgasket should cause it to overheat even worse when the engine is under load, no?

regards,

Zenon

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Guest Anonymous

britannia97.JPG

URL: http://www.zeebuck.com/02bc/index.htm

When you have good grounds, switching electrical loads on and off has absolutely no affect on the temp gauge. **Any** gauge jumping with electrical events indicates a ground problem.

The ground straps on my car meet at the battery neg clamp, but I have seen setups where the main ground from battery is to the engine, then a ground is run from the engine to the chassis. It really does not matter, so long as there is as close to zero resistance as possible between the battery, the chassis, and the engine.

regards,

Zenon

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