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New Trigger Wheel and Crank Sensor Mount


ClayW
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I was lucky enough to be a test mule, so I thought I'd show this stuff off:

New Trigger Wheel and Crank Sensor Mount from 02 Again.

TriggerWheel008.jpg

TriggerWheel004.jpg

*The black mess is slowing the leak from the hairline crack in my timing chain cover....which will be repaired after I swap motors. Gross, I know.

02 Again should have these available soon. They're preset to their sensor mounts, so it's really bolt-on.

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It is a 3 piece unit. Hub will be made of Stainless steel....(no rust and good wear in the main seal area) Trigger wheel and pulley are both mild steel.

Bolted together with Stainless fasteners. We looked at using Aluminum for the hub and pulley, but it comes up short in the wear properties area (rubber main seal and rubber belt both can be very abrasive features). Pulley is bolted with 4 fasteners and its design is basically a copy of the 2002tii design as is the main hub. We simply expanded the design to accommodate the trigger wheel. (and eliminated the toothed belt portion)

Production units should be available in maybe 2 if not 3 weeks. Price will be less then $200. (new BMW pulleys sell for $140 at Bav Auto and don't have trigger wheels)

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We looked at using Aluminum for the hub and pulley, but it comes up short in the wear properties area (rubber main seal and rubber belt both can be very abrasive features).

Hi Tom, the trigger wheel looks great! As an alterative SKF has a product called a Speedi-Sleeve that is used for repairing the seal wear surface where an oil seal typically runs. The sleeve is stainless steel and comes in various sizes. This could be an easy fix for the wear surface issue and let you go back to the aluminum design.

The SKF SPEEDI-SLEEVE is thin-walled, 0,28 mm (0,011 in), and made of high quality stainless steel. The contact surface is wear-resistant and machined to minimize directionality (0° ±0,05) with a finish of Ra 0,25 to 0,5 μm (10 to 20 μin), depending on size. This is, in fact, a better counterface than can often be achieved on a shaft.

The standard size range covers shaft diameters from 11,91 to 203,33 mm (0,472 to 8 in). Depending on production quantities, non-standard sizes can be produced. Each sleeve, metric or inch, is designed to fit a specific shaft range, usually above and below the nominal shaft diameter. This permits some flexibility to accommodate variations in the actual shaft size.

Check Here:

http://www.skf.com/skf/productcatalogue/jsp/viewers/productTableViewer.jsp?presentationType=3〈=en&tableName=4_5

Todd

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Guest Anonymous

Could be a good alternative. Sleeving will introduce other engineering problems that I don't want to deal with. I don't thing the little difference in weight is of any significance. Thanks for the idea though.

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Could be a good alternative. Sleeving will introduce other engineering problems that I don't want to deal with. I don't thing the little difference in weight is of any significance. Thanks for the idea though.

True as the mass is close to the center of rotation.

I'll take one please.

John

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I am such a peckerhead.

It looks really sexy, and that wheel

is just the bee's knees.

But I have to say, if I was running that sensor bracket on the race car,

I'd be worried about vibration. The sensor's pretty heavy,

and the bracket's in single shear.

I'd worry it'd move indicated by the white arrows, and fracture.

Thus, I'd brace it as with the red lines.

Now, this is in a car that spends a good part of its life running

up to 7500 rpm and back down, with not much of a flywheel

and some pretty stiff engine mounts.

But I've had too many things saw their ways free...

Yes, I'm a dick.

Sorry.

t

post-611-1366763263892_thumb.jpg

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Here's my original setup:

m113872376.jpg

That foil-thin piece of scrap aluminum moved around quite a bit on it's own and still never missed a beat. The tolerances for the Ford module and VR sensor are pretty forgiving. The 02 Again mount is infinitely more stable than the scrap aluminum mount and has only slightly more mass. I've got absolutely no racing experience, but I doubt that you'd have any problems with the 02 Again mount. Ultimately, there's no real pressure to be exerted on the sensor or mount, save vibrational resonance. I wonder if that would ever really be a problem, even in a vibrating behemoth of a race engine.

02-M10-EDIS-sensor-mount1.jpg

That being said, I always like seeing overkill engineering solutions. Show us what you come up with if you modify it!

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Guest Anonymous

46.4 grams for the Aluminum plate, 47.2 grams for the Sensor, 10.6 grams for the stainless nut, bolts, and washers. I'm thinkin' that's a pretty light sensor. .150" thick 6061 T651 lower and .200" upper plate thickness.

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