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Off topic: vintage car related though


Guest Anonymous
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Guest Anonymous

Gang, I'm almost buying a 1969 mg midget in good shape. I have never owned a British car but I realize it does not drive like a 2002 after I test drove it. And also after doing much reading, I know they are not as practical to own as a 2002. However, parts are cheaper than a 2002 and looks like easy to work on.

Any one with experience on owning one of these??

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Cheaper parts? I would REALLY look into that. The 2002 parts market is amazing. First off you can get almost any part used and in great condition for pretty cheap, and many people make new parts for it(i.e. Ireland, Massive, etc.) so its actually very affordable to own a 2002. Neighbor has a TR6 that he has owned since new. He drives it once a month. Not the same as my DD 02, which I take on LOTS of road trips. I hear its a solid car. The only issues are electrical and usually thats because its not maintained. Once the grounds start going you get LOTS of electrical issues.

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Cars don't get simpler than a Midget with an A series motor. You can fix anything with a rock and a flat blade screwdriver.

Not to hard to get 90 hp out of a 1275 however, like any ferrin car, performance costs mmmmoney. Then again, you only need to buy one Webber instead of two.

Give me a call sometime tomorrow and I'll give you the lowdown.

John 440 796 6078

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Over the years I've owned quite a few British cars. There were electrical glitches from time to time, but overall, they're pretty basic to work on and maintain. The last time I squeezed into a Sprite (Midget) I discovered that it wasn't as roomy as when I was a young man...

~ Lucas, Prince of Darkness

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I had a '64 MGB as a DD for many years. Very small, simple cars, but not much extra space for the hands and tools, and the Midgets are even smaller. I kept mine alive up to 140,000 miles or so. They definitely don't drive like '02s. The engines are based on 1940's tractor engines, so don't expect much.

First item is rust, just like '02s. Learn where to look for it. Floorboards, rockers, and around the battery box (behind the seats) plus around the windshield posts are where I remember the worst of it was.

Biggest issues were generator, starter drive, and ignition. Generator and starter drive gear (no solenoid, it engages with a screw drive when the starter is actuated) would each last only one or two years then die.

Learn how to dial in SU carbs. They're not that difficult.

Ignition (with points) would last no more than 6,000 miles before a full tune up was required. At 7,000 miles, it would be running on 3 cylinders. High energy electronic ignition wasn't readily available, but that would be well worth doing.

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The Spriget, so called because the MG Midget and the Austin Healey Sprite shared the same platform and drivetrain as of '61 (?) and were assembled on the same line.

It's a really fun car, but purpose built for driving. Forget grocery getting, weekenders, etc., it's just too tiny.

But, they're great cars. No more/less maintenance intensive that any other Brit car.

FYI, they all leak. If it's not staining your garage floor, something is seriously wrong.

British cars actually do not leak. They just 'mark' their territory!

Cheers!

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Guest Anonymous

Thanks for all the input. Looks like I'm going to get it this weekened. Only thing I didnt like about the car is the sitting position because I could not move the seats at all. I think he has after market seats on it and I couldn't find where the slider buttons are. Anyway, the car has not been driven in 7 years but it was restored before then. It has good body paint and interior. Engine and transmission has zero miles on rebuilt but all hydraulics are out looks like. The clutch is on the floor and the brakes on the floor and I'm sure I will have to go through the gas tank and carburetor. Also, I looks like the ignition switch by the steering is out. He wanted 2k for the car but letting me have it for $1700

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The midget is a small car. Small hands come in handy when working on them, especially up near the master cylinders. They will never fetch as much money as the bigger more roomy MGB, but will cost just as much to maintain. Brit cars like to be driven. When they sit, hydraulics tend to go bad and the electrical contacts and grounds start to corrode. They are a lot of fun if you don't mind tinkering with them. If you ever get a chance, I suggest you take a ride in a Triumph TR8. My choice for best classic car under 10K. Fast, comfortable, easy to work on and the power of a V8. One of these days, I'm going to drop one of my spare Rover V8s into either a 2002 or a 320.

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