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Methods for paint restoration


76Scott02
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I am going to try to restore or at least improve the finish on my Verona Red 76. In some areas the paint is quite oxidized.

Anyone out there have a method / or methods that worked particularly well? I was planning on doing a 3 step rubbing compound, polish and final wax procedure with a rotary buffer.

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This is my procedure to bring an older oxidized paint back to life (does not work if clearcoat is damaged):

1. Wash the car with dish soap (to degrease and de-wax it),

2. Clay until surface is smooth, keep it lubricated with either soapy water or quick detailer

3. Wash again and dry.

At that point rubbing compound might not be necessary.

4. Give it a good polish, and a

5. Wax.

Dieter

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That last post may be a little bit of simplification. My son runs a professional detailing company in Tucson and even a BMW, Mercedes, or Porsche that is only 4-5 yrs. old can easily take up to 10 hrs. to restore the finish to new (or better). He uses probably 10-12 different professional products during a detailing.

If it was easy we'd all have perfect looking cars all the time, but it takes technique, special products, and lots of elbow grease to do it right.

If you have specific questions you may email Lenny Napier, Soul Image Detailing, and I'm sure he'll provide you with some good tips.

soulimagedetailing@hotmail.com

Bob Napier

post-144-13667631574302_thumb.jpg

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There are lots of great products are out there. Just remember to work in the shade and start with the least abrasive cleaner/polish that will get the job done.

Watch out for the corners, as they will rub thru the paint layers the easiest if you use a buffer (my car has this on the decklid - not by me).

I use a Porter Cable Random orbital (DA) with foam pads and multiple step polishes from Griot's Garage.

+1 on the paint cleaning clay after a thorough wash and dry.

I'm with Bob - really detailing a vehicle takes alot of time. You can tell a quickie exterior detailing by all the paint swirls on a dark-colored car.

After all that hard work, make sure to wash, dry and wax the car using back-and-forth motions and not circular.

Here is my car in May 2008 after I used the Griot's machine polish and their "Best of Show" wax.

IMG_3107.jpg

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This is my procedure to bring an older oxidized paint back to life (does not work if clearcoat is damaged):

1. Wash the car with dish soap (to degrease and de-wax it),

2. Clay until surface is smooth, keep it lubricated with either soapy water or quick detailer

3. Wash again and dry.

At that point rubbing compound might not be necessary.

4. Give it a good polish, and a

5. Wax.

Dieter

this should work quite well, unless you are planning to take the car to Pebble Beach. I would stay away from the buffer, unless you have lots of experience using one.

The clay should remove the top layer, which has all the impurities (another word for crap) that falls on the paint and actually dulls it. Once you do that the shinny paint comes up, and then you wax it so the crap falls on the wax, not on the paint next time. After a few washes (which also washes away the wax) wax again.

If you are not happy with the results, take the car to a pro.

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Hello my name is Lenny Napier and as my father stated before I run my own High end Detail shop and am the only Chemical Guys Dealer in Arizona. I have been detailing for around 15 years now. I wanted to clear up a few things I read on here.

1. Clay baring will NOT remove any oxidized paint. It is a very important step in the reconditioning process but what it will remove is anything that is sitting on the paint surface, Tar, Grime, overspray, etc.

2. It is important to "strip" any old wax, polish, and sealant so that you are starting with a good clean surface. But do not EVER use DISH SOAP to do this. Using dish soap will also strip the vital nutrients out of the paint doing more harm than good. Use any good paint cleanser to do this.

3. If you have never used a rotary buffer before or do not have a lot of experience, do not use it on your paint. Use a good random orbital or DA to do the buffing as this will not cause the heat a rotary would lowering the risk of damage to the paint.

I am all for people doing their own detail work. I even write a bi-monthly column for our local CCA chapter. If anyone ever has any detailing questions please feel free to ask me any questions.

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The steps that I would use, I will be listing Chemical Guys, products as I have used everything out there and found that their's are the best out there, but whatever you have on hand would work.

1. Citrus wash and gloss- wax stripping wash.

2. Medium grade clay bar and clay lube

3. Pro polish 3n- great one step polish that can clear 85-90% of all imperfections (Use a White CCX 6.5" pad)

4. Glossworkz Glaze

5. Jet seal 109- Paint sealant- 2 coats, 24 hour cure then top with

6. Butter Wet Wax

For weekly maintenance I would use

Glossworkz wash, extreme synthetic Quick Detailer, VRP rubber treatment

and all 02 faq members get 10% off any order if your interested in ordering these products from me :)

soulimagedetailing@hotmail.com

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Really helpful tips,guys. I'll throw in my favorites. I really like the Zaino products. When we moved to upstate NY, I wanted a wax that would hold up during the winter snow/ice/salt and automatic car wash season.

I read a wax report where they applied a bunch of different waxes to door panels, and let them sit outside during a northeast winter. The zaino was still beading water after 7 months! That sounded good to me, as I am not a big fan of actually doing the detailing, but I like a nice-looking car. So I gave Zaino a try.

Here's my twice-a-year routine:

1. If never using Zaino before, wash car with Dawn to strip old wax. If previously Zaino'd , wash with good automotive car wash.

[After Lenny's post, I may look for an alternative to Dawn, but I only use it before the first application of Zaino]

2. Remove bugs, tar, and other alien intruders with clay bar, lubricating with ca wash soap.

3. If paint is oxidized, I've used various polishes in the past, from Zymol HD Cleanse to dedicated polishes. Recently I picked up some Zaino AIO to give a try.

4. If I've got light scratches or swirl marks, I put one coat of Zaino Z-5, then wipe off after it sets up. Then I put one or two coats of Zaino Z-2.

Zaino has simplified their process recently, and I like that I can do this all in one day, allowing about an hour for each coat of Zaino to cure while I enjoy a beverage. But as mentioned above, to get a good looking and protecting coat of anything does take time.

Ian

'76 M2 (+ a bunch of cars needing their fall Zaino)

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