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brake trouble


esty
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when we painted the 69 last summer, we disconnected and removed the brake fluid canister to paint the engine bay...when i disconnected the blue hose from the canister, i just looped them or connected them together to keep trash out...

putting things back together i discovered that my front and rear brakes grew some rust over the winter...the rears were easy, a few taps with a hammer and a few turns and wheels spin...

we had to take off the front calipers to clean the rotors and be sure the pads were ok....connected things, filled with fluid and can't get any pressure and trying to back the car up a bit tonight, it seems brakes are locked

any suggestions on what needs to be done...when i bought the car the PO had just put all new brakes including rear drums and new calipers on the front...the car hasn't been driven 5 miles since the new parts

w

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most likely you will need to remove the pistons in the brake calipers and clean them up. Replace the seals while you are at it. Sounds like they are frozen or stuck

when we removed the calipers, we also took the pads out for inspection and had no problems compressing the pistons...i'd think if they were gunk'd up, they would not have compressed so easily

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You may be right, the master cylinder could also be stuck in the compressed position. Have you checked it?

did not check the master but when you pump the brakes you can see bubbling and a slight drop in the fluid level in the reservoir which indicates the master is pumping...correct?

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You should not see any bubbling. That indiactes that air is in the system, or leaking into the system. A slight drop in fluid could just as easily mean the seals are bad and fluid is being forced past the Master piston seals instead of acting on the calipers as it should.

Not sure why you'd worry about rust on the rotors, this is normal because they are made of sintered iron which rusts very quickly. But just as quickly, the rust will be rubbed off with just a few applications of the brakes.

Worry about the Master. Whenever you replace wheel cylinders and/or calipers, more pressure is maintained in the system making the old Master the weak link. Also, the new parts can actually cause the Master to die because of the now higher pressure, esp. on a 30 something car. Even if the Master is not original, it's likely to be some yrs. old.

Cheers!

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You should not see any bubbling. That indiactes that air is in the system, or leaking into the system. A slight drop in fluid could just as easily mean the seals are bad and fluid is being forced past the Master piston seals instead of acting on the calipers as it should.

Not sure why you'd worry about rust on the rotors, this is normal because they are made of sintered iron which rusts very quickly. But just as quickly, the rust will be rubbed off with just a few applications of the brakes.

Worry about the Master. Whenever you replace wheel cylinders and/or calipers, more pressure is maintained in the system making the old Master the weak link. Also, the new parts can actually cause the Master to die because of the now higher pressure, esp. on a 30 something car. Even if the Master is not original, it's likely to be some yrs. old.

Cheers!

the master is as new as the rear drums and front rotors and calipers...the entire brakes system was replaced at the same time...all but the booster

we removed the calipers because we could not get the wheels to turn...the pads rusted to the rotors...otherwise we wouldn't have removed them...while they were off, we took advantage of the situation and cleaned the rotors

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sounds like brake hoses 2 me they tend to collapse from the inside out letting fluid down to the calipers,but not letting the fluid back up to the master thus lockikng the brakes up.

i have a set of new stainless lines that i never installed...i reckon it's time to get hubby off the sofa.........again

i'll let you guys know what happens next...thanks

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One additional thought I have, esty. You live in a very humid climate and, while the hoses were disconnected, enough moisture may have gotten into the master cyclinder to have caused some rust that is preventing it from functioning as intended. And, as implied above, you should not get bubbles up into the reservoir when you pump the brakes. If your pistons retracted very smoothly I would doubt that the hoses are completely collapsed, but this is the time to get those stainless lines in.

Bob Napier

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ok guys...today steve bled the entire system...he said there was a lot of air in all lines...the 1st time he hit the brakes, brake pedal was at the top and the front brakes were locked again...i believe it must be the lines as stated above...he has new braided lines for the front but couldn't get the steel lines to turn...he was afraid he'd strip the nut

will carefully heating the brake line fittings maybe free them

also....is this the lines i need for the rear?...->rear brake hose

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