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75 2002 Sleeper - M20B32, ITB, LSD


tinkwithanr

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Small update. My cousin came down to help me for the day and I didn't bring my dslr from home, so I only have one picture. I start framing out the trunk for the fuel cell and roll cage. If you look at the center section you can see the fuel cell will be slightly offset to the passenger side to help center the drivers weight.

12%25208%253A52%253A30%2520PM.jpg

Expect more updates soon.

Tinker Engineering - 2014

 

Mica - 2000 BMW 323i - The one that started it all

Fiona - 1975 BMW 2002 - The Definition of Project Creep

Heidi - 1988 BMW M5 - The piece of BMW history

Silvia - 2013 Subaru WRX - Stock, for now

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Thanks,

I'm not 100% sure where it's gonna end up, I think I'm going to start with it split evenly and see how that looks. I want to keep some trunk space, but it depends how the group clearance looks.

Tinker Engineering - 2014

 

Mica - 2000 BMW 323i - The one that started it all

Fiona - 1975 BMW 2002 - The Definition of Project Creep

Heidi - 1988 BMW M5 - The piece of BMW history

Silvia - 2013 Subaru WRX - Stock, for now

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Got some more done today. First thing first, I needed to decide how high up to place the gas tank. It's a delicate balance of ground clearance vs. a low center of gravity.

Checking out different heights using the floor jack:

_DSC0023.JPG

I ended up with the fuel cell sitting ~5.5 below the top of the frame that was already fab'd. The next step was to start cutting the tubing to size. Here are the down tubes that connect the top frame to the lower section:

_DSC0031.JPG

Then I cut out a bunch of other tubes and threw them together like so:

_DSC0032.JPG

The largest tubes in the above picture are 2" x 2" x 0.125" wall. Then the outer fuel cell frame is 1" x 1" x 0.125" wall, and the smaller bracing a triangulation bars are 0.75" x 0.75" x 0.0625" wall. It may be a bit overkill, but it will be very secure.

Side View:

_DSC0033.JPG

View from Underneath:

_DSC0034.JPG

Shot from a couple steps back. The framework shouldn't be visible except from very far away:

_DSC0035.JPG

It's hard to see clearly in the picture below, but the fuel cell is about 1" higher than the floor pan at the lowest point. So while I don't have a very big departure angle, clearance shouldn't be to bad:

_DSC0036.JPG

Fuel Cell in place:

_DSC0037.JPG

Top Shot:

_DSC0038.JPG

Bottom View:

_DSC0039.JPG

Then the last thing I did for the day was to remove the rubber bits from the bumper, which makes the lines much cleaner. Then test fit it to see how it looked. Overall I'm much happier with the change:

_DSC0040.JPG

_DSC0041.JPG

Next up on the list is to start fitting the sheet metal for the trunk floor as well as the fuel cell hold down and the rear suspension reinforcements.

Go Bucks!

Tinker Engineering - 2014

 

Mica - 2000 BMW 323i - The one that started it all

Fiona - 1975 BMW 2002 - The Definition of Project Creep

Heidi - 1988 BMW M5 - The piece of BMW history

Silvia - 2013 Subaru WRX - Stock, for now

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Probably not. I'm not sure if I'm going to connect my fuel cell to the stock inlet or just fill from the trunk, but even if I don't use the stock location for fuel I think I'll put a connector in the stock location that runs to the battery for trickle charging and jump starting.

Tinker Engineering - 2014

 

Mica - 2000 BMW 323i - The one that started it all

Fiona - 1975 BMW 2002 - The Definition of Project Creep

Heidi - 1988 BMW M5 - The piece of BMW history

Silvia - 2013 Subaru WRX - Stock, for now

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Progress from tonight. Started off with some exploratory surgery on the rear driver side fender lip. Before making up the trunk floor, I want to use the extra space and access the void gives me to make the necessary cuts for the fender flares. This involves taking out ~2 inches of the outer fender lip and then splicing the new edge into the inner fender. This will also let me see if there is any rust hiding in the inner body that I couldn't see before.

First I transferred the mounting holes for the fender flare so I knew where the cut would go. I left ~ 3/4" of material from the mounting holes, which should be plenty.

_DSC0043.JPG

Then I trimmed out the lip. Here you can see the inner fender material and the edge that will be spliced into it.

_DSC0045.JPG

With the fender trimmed, I am happy to say that the rusty parts of the inner fender lip were on the parts I cut out, so after some final trimming the splices should go fairly easily. With that done I decided to move away from the chassis work for a little bit.

Tis the season:

_DSC0046.JPG

Next I moved to reinforcing the transmission and engine mounts I made earlier. First up was the transmission mount.

Here's the top side after cleaning up all the welds. Once it's powdercoated it will resemble a stock stamped piece:

_DSC0051.JPG

And this is the underside as I left it before:

_DSC0049.JPG

While this would be fine for a stock M10 setup, I wasn't really happy with it for my goals. Likewise, I wanted to avoid partially boxing it due to the possibility of trapping water on the inside. So I decided to use some of my 0.75" tubing and triangulate the inner walls. This should add the needed rigidity while letting it dry easily.

_DSC0052.JPG

Moving on to the engine mounts, I wanted to add some internal bracing before fully boxing them in. To keep weight down I made them out of a thinner gauge, so the bracing will let me keep the strength while having a lower weight of a similar piece made from heavier material (such as my first generation of mounts).

Here's how they looked from earlier:

_DSC0053.JPG

Some flat stock later and this is how they looked when I finished tonight:

_DSC0054.JPG

_DSC0055.JPG

Tomorrow I'll finish boxing the engine mounts, once done they will look like a solid piece of tubing with the bracing completely hidden. Then it's on to the other fender lip and more bodywork.

Thanks for looking.

Tinker Engineering - 2014

 

Mica - 2000 BMW 323i - The one that started it all

Fiona - 1975 BMW 2002 - The Definition of Project Creep

Heidi - 1988 BMW M5 - The piece of BMW history

Silvia - 2013 Subaru WRX - Stock, for now

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Quick update for the day's progress, I only had a few hours to work on her but I got the Engine and Trans mounts finished up.

For the engine mounts, I wanted to fully box them, both for strength and because I think they look much better that way. But I still needed to have clearance around the nut for securing the rubber mount. So I took some 1" I.D. pipe and welded it around the stud hole.

_DSC0001.JPG

With it welded in place, I cut the pipe at an angle so that I could weld it flush with the rest of the mount. Then I proceeded to cut out the rest of the top pieces for the mount using my normal paper template method. With all of them cut out and tacked in place, your left with this:

_DSC0002.JPG

With everything in place it could be fully welded:

_DSC0003.JPG

Then ground flush on all sides:

_DSC0004.JPG

With these finished up I'm going to put the engine and trans back in the car. That will let me work on some of the other things up front while I finalize my rear suspension set up and keep knocking out the body work.

Thanks for looking.

Tinker Engineering - 2014

 

Mica - 2000 BMW 323i - The one that started it all

Fiona - 1975 BMW 2002 - The Definition of Project Creep

Heidi - 1988 BMW M5 - The piece of BMW history

Silvia - 2013 Subaru WRX - Stock, for now

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i just finished seeing your entire beginning to present work story. i've been restoring 2002's for some 30 years now.......and....all i can muster is....wow.

wow.

it is so refreshing to see fabrication skills that were usually reserved for a few dying breed of craftsmen (like me) used as an art form by a young guy as skilled as yourself! you....my friend.....have it! ......wonderful feeling after an idea comes to life, is'nt it? i, too.....know that feeling. your project rocks!

keep on keepin' on! i want to see the rest!

hendi

p.s. i......love.........your lathe.

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You've done a great job on everything and you are to be commended for the effort you put in. One small suggestion if you haven't done it already. Is your fuel tank sitting directly on the metal framework you built? You may want to put some strips of rubber to buffer it from contact with the metal around it. It will keep it from possibly vibrating against it and creating noise. Maybe setting it in 3M strip caulk on the bottom and putting some rubber around the sides.

Mike Katsoris CCA#13294                                                

74 InkaGangster 4281862

2016 Porsche Boxster Spyder,    2004 BMW R1150RT,  
76 Estorilblau 2740318                      

 
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i just finished seeing your entire beginning to present work story. i've been restoring 2002's for some 30 years now.......and....all i can muster is....wow.

wow.

it is so refreshing to see fabrication skills that were usually reserved for a few dying breed of craftsmen (like me) used as an art form by a young guy as skilled as yourself! you....my friend.....have it! ......wonderful feeling after an idea comes to life, is'nt it? i, too.....know that feeling. your project rocks!

keep on keepin' on! i want to see the rest!

hendi

p.s. i......love.........your lathe.

Thanks so much. I like to think that I'm holding my own with this stuff, but there is still a long way to go. Hopefully the breed isn't dying off just yet!

(And I love it too...)

Tinker Engineering - 2014

 

Mica - 2000 BMW 323i - The one that started it all

Fiona - 1975 BMW 2002 - The Definition of Project Creep

Heidi - 1988 BMW M5 - The piece of BMW history

Silvia - 2013 Subaru WRX - Stock, for now

Link to comment
Share on other sites

One small suggestion if you haven't done it already. Is your fuel tank sitting directly on the metal framework you built? You may want to put some strips of rubber to buffer it from contact with the metal around it. It will keep it from possibly vibrating against it and creating noise. Maybe setting it in 3M strip caulk on the bottom and putting some rubber around the sides.

Thanks for the input. The trunk is far from done right now, and I am planning to isolate the gas tank from the rest of the trunk. For starters there will be a sheet metal skin not only on the trunk floor, but on the fuel cell framework as well. This should help protect the aluminum from the elements, unlike the stock tank that just hung down out in the open. Also, I'm planning to put either rubber strips or perhaps an undercoating type material all along the inside of the framed area, so that any vibrations will be kept to a minimum (as you suggested). Then there will be sound deadening and a thermal barrier on the outside of the shell to help keep the heat from the exhaust from warming the cell to much. Lastly the tank will have some hold down straps that go across the top of it to hold it steady.

As much as I'd love for that part to be finished, there's still a long ways to go lol.

Tinker Engineering - 2014

 

Mica - 2000 BMW 323i - The one that started it all

Fiona - 1975 BMW 2002 - The Definition of Project Creep

Heidi - 1988 BMW M5 - The piece of BMW history

Silvia - 2013 Subaru WRX - Stock, for now

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Share on other sites

Taking a break from the rear of the car for now. Hopefully I'll get the coils on order for the rear in the next couple of days, so that should let me figure out the suspension pickups back there which I'd like to do before finishing out the trunk floor and fender cuts.

So moving onto the front I decided to re-assemble the front end so I can start to figure out things like radiator mounts, and the rest of the engine accessories. I also wanted to throw the front of the turbo body kit on to see how she would look:

_DSC0005.JPG

There's a surprising amount of room in there with the M20 in place:

_DSC0006.JPG

Driver Side Engine Mount:

_DSC0007.JPG

Passenger Side Mount:

_DSC0008.JPG

Then I threw the hood and grills on to make it almost look like a real car.

_DSC0009.JPG

The rest of the night was spent taking some measurements for the radiator supports and trying to plan out the removable front clip. I'm going to try and make the nose removable without having to disconnect the radiator to make other engine maintenance easier, but it depends on how much room I end up with. I still need to trim the nose panel a bit to cut out rust and make room for the oil cooler hoses running back to the block.

Thanks for looking :D

Tinker Engineering - 2014

 

Mica - 2000 BMW 323i - The one that started it all

Fiona - 1975 BMW 2002 - The Definition of Project Creep

Heidi - 1988 BMW M5 - The piece of BMW history

Silvia - 2013 Subaru WRX - Stock, for now

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Share on other sites

This is an unbelievable and enjoyable process, I can not wait for the next installment, this is up in "Paul Cain" level of work.

To help costs on this project, you should start making steering and engine mount kits for others M20 conversion projects.

I was wondering though the back subframe bar where the diff is attached, should there be another set of ears on the back end of the diff like there is on the stock diff hanger? Especially since you are looking at 400+HP

As for the diff cooler plate is that OEM or the copy version we see for sale on Ebay?

Also it looks like there is a material gap where you cut out in the trunk to where the sub frame bar attached, how are you going to weld that area in with such a tight confines?

If I was going to dream with all that room made in the front, it should not be too hard to fit an M5 V8 would it? ; ) The only change one would need to do is an aftermarket brake booster, Tii spindles, engine mounts and reinforcement plate, I think they are rated at 400 or so?

All in all I am in awe!!

Justin

The question is not that we broke a few rules or took certain liberties with our female guests.

We did ;)

Charlie don't surf!!

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This is an unbelievable and enjoyable process, I can not wait for the next installment, this is up in "Paul Cain" level of work.

Thanks! But I don't know if I would go that far lol.

To help costs on this project, you should start making steering and engine mount kits for others M20 conversion projects.

I've thought about it, but at this point I would rather put the little spare time I have towards the car rather than making parts for others.

I was wondering though the back subframe bar where the diff is attached, should there be another set of ears on the back end of the diff like there is on the stock diff hanger? Especially since you are looking at 400+HP

While the stock '02 diff mount does in fact have an ear in the front and the back of the differential cover, the e36 cover I'm using doesn't work like that. The bushings in the e36 cover are designed to only have one surface of contact in the front. If you put dual ears on the diff like in the 2002 you would probably run into vibration issues as the differential bushings wouldn't be held in place correctly.

As for the diff cooler plate is that OEM or the copy version we see for sale on Ebay?

The differential cooler I pictured is made by Rogue Engineering.

Also it looks like there is a material gap where you cut out in the trunk to where the sub frame bar attached, how are you going to weld that area in with such a tight confines?

I will weld it from both sides. Front the top it looks very tight, but the bottom still gives decent access.

If I was going to dream with all that room made in the front, it should not be too hard to fit an M5 V8 would it? ; ) The only change one would need to do is an aftermarket brake booster, Tii spindles, engine mounts and reinforcement plate, I think they are rated at 400 or so?

Lol, aside from the slight difference in price between an M20 and an S60, there is a HUGE difference in weight. While you could probably do it, I wanted to retain a bit of the cornering characteristics of the 2002. It would be a lot of fun though!

Tinker Engineering - 2014

 

Mica - 2000 BMW 323i - The one that started it all

Fiona - 1975 BMW 2002 - The Definition of Project Creep

Heidi - 1988 BMW M5 - The piece of BMW history

Silvia - 2013 Subaru WRX - Stock, for now

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