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About this blog

This is the story about the restoration of a 1-owner car, a 1975 2002 by a reasonably experienced and mechanically inclined 7 car owner.  This is my 14th BMW and 5th complete car restoration. The goal is to have this car complete and show ready in time for the Pittsburgh Vintage Grand Prix in July of 2018.  I want the car to be mostly stock, with a slightly more modern, aggressive stance.  I will try to write about the journey and will show pictures along the way.    

Entries in this blog

 

I found a great puzzle box!

When I restore cars, I like to have both the puzzle car and a puzzle box car.  Sometimes that is pretty diificult. Sometimes it works out great!  I am still bogged down with another project and have not been able to bring my stripped down Polaris '75 back from the warehouse yet, but I came across an amazing deal on a puzzle box 2002!  It is a Chamonix '74 and it is an older restoration that still looks spectacular.  I picked it up today in New York and hauled it back home.   The car is pristine inside and out!  It has a very, very small list of immediate needs (5-speed shift linkage needs to be tightened up and the rebuilt engine with 38/38 weber and 292 cam idles a little low when cold) that I should be able to bang out in no time.  Look for me and this car at the Pittsburgh Vintage Grand Prix!         
 

A frustrating move using a U-Haul trailer!

My youngest daughter is graduating from high school this year and her grad party is in 2 weeks.  My wife has been working on tent rentals, catering, etc. and unfortunately, I promised her that the 2002 would be out of the garage by then.  I honestly thought it would be at the paint shop.  Well, I explained in a prior posst that my scheduleis way off and I'm not going ot have this car ready for Oktoberfesdt/PVGP, so I had to get the car battened down for a trip to the warehouse where I keep a couple of other cars.       Yesterday, I attached a couple of 2x6 boards to the pylons of the dolly to make them sturdier for transport.  I also installed a handful of through-bolt eye-bolts into the dolly to use as tie down points.     I was unable to secure a regular flat car trailer, so I decided to try to use a U-haul 6x12 trailer with the loading ramp.  I knew this would probably be a major challenge, but I thought the experiment was worth the $35 rental fee for the day.  I can't use a regular U-haul car hauler because the wheels of my dolly are not wide enough to fit on the ramps or tracks.     Winch Solution:   I bought a small ATV winch from Harbor Freight for $56 (with the always happening 20% off web-coupon) and mounted it to the front of my car dolly.  I'll add some pictures of that when I get a chance as I think it is pretty cool.  The thing has a remote key fob, so you don't need wires.   I set a car battery in the 2002's battery tray and hooked the winch up directly to the battery with a fuse.   Now whatever trailer I use, I will always be able to load and unload the car!      There are a couple of major considerations when using a U-haul trailer.      1. The gate is not the full width of the trailer.   The gate opening is 58 inches wide and the "fence" at the gate is 27 inches tall (it is taller around the rest of the trailer).  The frame rail of a 2002 is about 53 inches wide. but the doors are wider than 58 inches wide.  By pure dumb luck I built my dolly to be about 27 inches tall.  Even so, with the angled fence and an inclined ramp, I had initially a little over an inch of clearance to the frame rail on both sides when loading and managed to scrape the car slightly where the lower trim would be if it were installed.  Once the car was in the trailer, there was moderate clearance on all sides except the back (see below).  Raise the tongue more (see below) to get more clearance at the gate.   If you have a dolly that sets the car lower than about 27 inches, you will not be able to use this type of U-Haul trailer.       2. The bed of a U-Haul trailer is CORRUGATED STEEL!  It is not flat!   The disadvantage of this did not fully dawn on me until I was ready to unload the car and could not get the swivel castors to rotate so I could unload it.  In the end, I used a floor jack to lift each end of the dolly and turn the wheels around by hand.   I would HIGHLY recommend getting some plywod to place on the bed of the trailer if you decide to use one.      3. The tongue jack only jacks the tongue to a little above level.  The issue here is that you want the ramp to be as in-line with the trailer bed as possible to avoid bottoming out on the lip of the trailer and you want as much clearance as possible around that gate fence.  I happened to have a bunch of 2x8x8 blocks I made as jack-stand extensions and I threw 3 under the tongue jack to make high enough when unloading.      4. The trailer isn't long enough.  I thought I measured my car and that it would fit on a 12 foot trailer without bumpes.  Apparently not, as there was about 8 inches sticking out the back when I get the car all the way in with about 4 inches of space up front.  I did not think to measure the trailer but suspect that it is not really 12 feet.  Fortunately, I had some huge sheets of foam insulation and I just tied the (counterbalanced) trailer ramp to the trailer and put the pads behind the rear lower sill of the car.    5.  The tongue of the trailer extends 8 feet beyond the trailer to the hitch.  With that huge tongue, the whole rig including the truck was nearly 40 feet long.  This made maneuvering the truck to my garage at the rear of the house very difficult.  I drove on the lawn.  ALOT.  My wife nearly killed me when she saw the damage I did.  Hey, it's grass!  And it is growing season!  I'm sure it will be fine for the grad partyy in two weeks!  :-)     The trailer had plenty of tie downs and I was able to secure tiedowns from the eyelets I installed on the dolly to the trailer very easily.  Once loaded, the car didn't move an inch.       The 2002 is now resting peacefully in the warehouse space where it will probably sit until mid-June when I can start working on it again.  I'm already working on other ways to get the car back into my garage that do not involve a U-Haul trailer.       Thanks for reading!  I hope this was useful for you!     Scott    
 

Day 179: Brake booster and schedule delays

First, the good news.  I shipped my brake booster off to Power Brake Exchange in San Jose/Bell Gardens and Louis turned it around in about a week.  (http://www.pwrbrake.com/ )   I have not had a chance to test it yet, of course, but oit looks great!   Here is a before image.  BRake fluid had stripped a lot of the paint off and there was a layer of crud, of course.  And here is an after shot.  They dismantled, soda blasted and repainted the unit.  The only things they did not do is mask off the studs and replace the bellows and vacuum nipple, which is OK since they are in good shape and I can't even find a number for them and am assuming they is NLA.      The price for this service was somewhat less than the other vendors I found.  The site mentions a core, but you have to send them your core to rebuild.  I am certain this is the unit I sent them.   http://www.pwrbrake.com/inventory/search/yr/1975/make/bmw/mdl/2002/smdl/base/l/2.0/cyl/4/   OK, now the bad news.  I have had a few setbacks including an odd medical one (called Fever of unknown origin) that put me out for about 3 weeks, as well as a delay on one of my larger revenue generating projects.  I had expected to have this car out of paint by now and be working to rebuild it almost full time.  Clearly, that hasn't happened and I'm dedicating about 110% to the other project so I can get it done.  As a result, there is no way I'll be bringing this car to The Pittsburgh Vintage Grand Prix/Oktoberfest in July.  I will have at least one other non-BMW there and I will probably bring a different BMW, but I was really hoping to have a 2002 there for the 50th anniversary, especially since I signed up and committed to having a 2002.  I'm half-tempted to buy another "before" 2002 to bring and am actually looking for another car, but am not optimistic.  I'll be wrapped up with that other project by early June, so I'll be back on this project then.      Who knows, this may be a good thing.  My engine rebuilder told me it would be 3-months before he could get my engine back so I was only going to have the head done and had planned to do all the gaskets myself.   This might be an opportunity to get the engine rebuilt properly and brought up to the standard of the rest of rest of the car.    Take care and thanks for reading!                   
 

Day 162: Seats out, tank out, more trim off and new fenders

With the dolly done, I've been working on pulling parts off of and out of the car in preparation for soda blasting and paint.   First, I drained and removed the gas tank.  I have a small marine gas pump and an extra 4 gallon gas can, which I completley filled 3 times (and dumped the gas into my truck).  So that was over 75 lbs in gas and another 15 lbs or so for the tank.    Then I took the seats out.   The seats are a bit of a mystery.  The latches for both backs are broken and the headrests don't move.  I have new covers for the seats, but this was the first time I was able to take a really good look at them.  The back seats have no padding at all on the bottom but some foam padding that somebody may have added on the back.  This makes sense because the seat bottom is newer and doesn't match the back.   The front seats have horsehair pads but the bottoms have been repadded and include some foam.  I recall the horsehair on my other BMWs was constantly depositing hair on the carpet under the seats.  No horsehair under the seats on these.  So if I'm really lucky, somebody replaced the horsehair pads and supplemented it with an extra foam pad.  I won't know unti l start dismantling them.    The front seat backs are a different story.  They are clearly the original horsehair, which is in bad shape.   Since getting foam density right is such a dark art, I think I might try to find some replacement foam from a similar seat from a different car and cut it as needed to make it fit.  Newer car seats often use multi-density foam that you can't just buy at a fabric store. (i.e. softer layer on top, stiffer bolsters, stiffer on bottom, all in one gradual foam pour rather than layers of sheet foam.)  If I can find something close, I'll try it and let you know how it goes.        Back seat bottom. New cover.  No padding at all other than the backing on the cover.  Note surface rust everywhere.     Seat back.  Looks OK.  Old cover.  decent foam.  More surface rust.  Was there originally horsehair here?  My '76 530 had horsehair everywhere.     Front seats in the original US-spec vinyl and velour.  Just a bit too ratty to be cool.   Front seat bottom.  Padding and a piece of plastic.  There is some light colored, non-original horsehair in there that is not disintigrating.  More surface rust.     Front seat back.  Kind of scary.  Original horsehair is disintigrating, of course.   Headrest rods are rusted so badly that they won't budge.  (I'll hit them with barkeepers friend)  Note stray wire on left, that is the broken back latch release.  Parts for that are NLA so I'll have to get creative.  I am determined to put these or equivelent original seats back in the car.   I might have the frames soda or media blasted in an effort to remove the rust.    I was also able to remove a bunch more trim including the lower trim, the midline trim, the waistline trim and the gutter trim.  I still have to remove the trunk and remove the trim from the trunk and the hood.  And of course I have to remove all of the little plastic trim keepers from the body.  And I have to remove the front fenders.....   The new reproduction fenders came in from Restoration Design.  I posted some info in a thread elsewhere, but here is an image of one of the fenders. These are wallothnesch fenders and they look OK.  Might have to fiddle with the openings for the corner markers a little and there is some drilling to be done, but they will work.  Sorry, I just realized I don't have an image of the entire fender as I was most concerned about the light fitment.      I also got the Ireland Engineering front air dam as well as the rebuild kit for the steering box.  I haven't opened them yet, but I was a little surprised at the way the air dam (and steering box kit wrapped inside) was packaged.  I don't think I've ever recieved an auto body part that was just wrapped in saran and shipped like this.  Normally, $56 in shipping would warrant a box. This "package" weighed 2 lbs, 12 oz!   To be fair, Restoration Design charged me $70 for shipping but that was for 2 fenders and they were large, well padded and double boxed, total weight of the fenders: 25 lbs.  I like Ireland Engineering a lot and will keep buying stuff from them, but geeeez guys!  Presentation means a lot!        That's it for the past week.   I'll post what I did this weekend shortly.    

Hodgepodge

Hodgepodge

 

Day 158: Car dolly for non-welders

Today I built a car dolly out of 4x4 lumber and 3/4 inch OSB.  It is a little taller than I expected, but it turned out OK.  A while back I asked for images of dollies and I got a bunch of nice ones but I didn't really like the stacked matchstick designs of most of the wooden ones.   I have a general contracting license as another one of my hobbies and I have scratch built a lot of stuff....like this out of pressure treated timber.   So I designed something that others have made out of square steel tubing and reionforced it with OSB.  It was a bit of a trial and error process primarily due to the height of it and a couple of angles that are unusual.    Here is the finished product.     It might not look that sturdy, but the little trusses and gussets make it perfectly stiff.  They add a couple of hundred pounds of lateral force resistance each.  It rolls around very easily and the posts, although the images may make it look otherwise, are perfectly vertical. (There is a 4 degree slope on the front subframe mounting rail, BTW).  Before I move this out of the garage, I will connect a couple of 2x6 boards along the bottom using lag bolts and will probably run one from the front base to the upper wooden crossmember in the back.   Oddly, it is much more comfortable to be under the car when lifted with this than it is to be under it when jacked up on my 6 ton jack stands.  That is probably because this is bolted to the car, so there is no chance the car will suddenly hop or fall off of the dolly.      I looked everywhere for decent, locking, pnuematic wheels but Harbor Freight was out and Home Depot didn't have enough, so I settled on locking Urethane wheels rated at 350 lbs each.  My guess is that the body with glass, interior and a nearly full gas tank weighs about 900-1000 lbs.  What I didn't calculate, though, is that the rear portion of the dolly is probably taking about 60%-65% of the weight.  Once I got the wheels on (I built it without the wheels but pre-drilled so I could jack up the dolly and install them), I gave it a good shove thinking it would be hard to move and watched in shock as the car sailed straight into my workbench.  Ouch!   No damage, though, fortunately.    The only thing I didn't think of, besides how scary high I needed to jack up the car to attach the dolly, is that the dolly is in the way of the body jack points in the rear.   So to take this down, I'll need to do it in stages and use the 2x8 attached to the differential mount points.        And if I had to build it again, I would make it about 6 inches shorter.  Right now, the bottom of the car is about 27 inches off the ground and if I change out the wheels, it will be 2 inches higher than that.  My paint guy will need a pretty tall ladder to paint the roof and an even taller one to make sure it is correct and even.     The goal is to have it over to soda blasting by the 2nd or 3rd week in April , depending on the weather.  SO much to do before then.           

Hodgepodge

Hodgepodge

 

Day 151: Rear subframe removal and a surprise!

For some reason,  dropping the rear subframe seemed a little more daunting than dropping the front.   Maybe it was because I haven't had to crawl under the back end of this car much so far.   I also did not have a complete plan for how I was going to do this and did not have a punchlist for completion like I did with the other items I've removed so far.       And then there was something that has never happened before.  At the end, I got a prize!   If you hate long winded blogs, skip to the last couple of images to see what it was.      I was unable to get the exhaust system apart and the driveshaft was still attached to the differential, so these two items were also present.  I removed them after the rear subframe was dropped.     HIgh level steps. Remove E-brake cable. Disconnect rear brakes Remove shock absorber connections Remove differential mount bolts Remove two bolts on each side of car to release crossmembers. Lower subframe.        So, I'll go through the steps with some images and maybe turn this into a little article too.  I got enough images, I think.    If anyone reads this and thinks I did something backwards or wrong, let me know.     Here's the process:     Remove the rear wheels from the car (i.e. loosen the wheel lugs with the car on the ground, then do next step).  Jack the car up and put it on jackstands that are supporting the car at the outer jack points in the rear.  (I had to hang my 6-ton jack stands half way off the edge of the car in the rear, which was a little odd, but it was very stable.)  You want the jack stands to be as outboard as possible so the subframe can be removed from under the car without hitting them.     Inside the car, remove the E-brake boot and remove the two nuts on each of the e-brake cables so the cables are free.  With a straight circlip tool remove the circlip from the hand brake and pull out the large pin to release the brake handle from the car.  This might not be a circlip with holes, but the straight circlip tool will still work.   My hand brake did not fall apart.     Under the car, just in front of the front crossmember on the rear suspension, you will find sort of a joint where the car brake cable guide meets the suspension cable guide.  Tug on that to separate the guide and pull the E-brake cable out from inside the car. Use a 14mm and 11mm/7/16 inch wrench to disconnect the hydraulic brake lines where the flexible lines from the body meet the hard lines on the rear suspension.   Bag the little spring-like holders. Ok, here's the order I used.   It might have been easier to do things in a different order, but I will never know.   Under the car, remove the nuts from the differential mount to the body but leave the bolts in place for now.   Remove the 17mm front bolt on the leading suspension arm.  My leading arms were bent so they sprang a little when the bolt came free.  If you have an extra set of jack stands, place them unddr the drums of the rear wheels.  This will prevent them from falling abrubtly in the next step.  It isn't the end of the world if they do.   The springs might drop out.      Inside the trunk, remove the two nuts holding each rear shock absorber in place.   Once the shocks are free, you can retract them by hand in teh wheel wells to make them easier to deal with.   Place your floor jack under and slightly in front of the output shafts of the differential.  See the image above.  That location or a little further forward should work.  With a breaker bar, break loose the 21mm nuts holding the rear of the leading arms to the body but do not remove them yet.  (These are the last nuts you will remove.)   At the differential, remove the bolts we left in place earlier.  Make one last check that the jack is where you want it.   Go ahead and remove the 21mm nuts we loosened earlier.   The arms may come off with the nuts.   Carefully lower the floorjack making sure that the subframe drops evenly from side to side so it does not get hung up on the bolts that those 21mm nuts attach to.  If it does get hung up, raise it a little and wiggle the subframe until it comes free. The springs will drop out if they haven't already.    Here is an image of the lowered subframe including the driveshaft and exhaust.    Note the extreme outboard position of the floor jack.   I dragged the whole thing out from under the car but will place this on a furniture dolly so I can move it around more easily.   That;s it!   Oh, wait!    The surprise!   It is actually in the image above.  Do you see it sitting on the crossmember?      Holy crap!  It is a 1980s vintage magnetic hide-a-key with a somewhat rusty spare key inside!          The original purchaser of this car must have put this key there and, sadly, he took the secret to his grave.  His daughter sold me the car.  Thanks buddy!      Well, I hope that was useful, or at least interesting!      Thanks,   Scott                                       

Hodgepodge

Hodgepodge

 

Day 150: Remaining engine bay stuff out!

After dropping the front subframe earlier today, and stopping to write about it, I kept going in an effort to get everything out of the engine bay in preparation for a thorough cleaning and probably soda blasting.  Like pulling on a thread, things starting coming out in a fairly systematic way.  Front brake lines, brake reservoir, master cylinder, brake booster (what a PITA those tight bolts are), pedal box, labeled and unclipped the wiring harness, lights, firewall heat shield, drains, clips and grommets.   The inside of the car is more or less intact (except for where I ripped up the carpet to get to the pedal box) so I still have to remove the brake booster support bracket that attaches from inside the car.    No major surprises and no rust!       Here's more-or-less what the engine bay looked like this morning.           And here is what it looks like tonight.   Still a lot of cleaning to do and of course everything I removed has to be cleaned, rebuilt, refreshed or refinished too!    I was also able to pull out all of the front lights/reflectors and start pulling the trim.        Tomorrow I'm hoping to tackle the rear subframe, rear bumper and more trim.   I also need to build a dolly.  Let's see how far I can get....              

Hodgepodge

Hodgepodge

 

Day 150: Front subframe out

My big goal today was to remove the front subframe and as many have said, it really was not difficult since I already had the engine and transmission out.   Many people here provided great info on the subframe drop process, but I took a lot of pictures with the idea that I will post a brief article for those who want to do the same thing.  The whole subframe with the steering box attached weighs about 90-100 lbs.  It is not difficult to deal with, but you can't just let it drop either.     If you haven't figured it out yet, I write almost everything in this and other forums as either a question or an answer.   I was in higher education for 30 years and it is a very old habit.  Ask me about my Youtube or Instructible.com stuff if you want to be really bored.   I digress.    Again, this was JUST for the subframe and front suspension.  If you are dropping transmission, engine and subframe as one unit, you will need to disconnect a lot more pieces and the whole package will weight, what, about 525 lbs?      You will need 11mm, 12mm, 14mm and 17mm wrenches and sockets, a breaker bar, a large flathead screwdriver, a large pair of channel-locks, some paper towels (for wiping brake fluid), some baggies for your parts and (2) 2-3 foot long bungee cords (for the struts).    Here are the steps involved.    Jack the car up and put it on jackstands.   Youcan either use thejacking mountpoints or in my case I used the inner body frame members because I already had the car jacked up using those.   Remove the wheels.   Put the key in the ignition and turn it to acc to release the steering column lock.  You will need this to rotate the  With 2 13mm wrenches, loosen up the steering coupling joint and remove the top and bottom clamp bolts. (There is a groove in the splines so you have to remove them completely.  Don't forget to bag and tag them.)   With a wedge or large screwdriver, loosen up the joint and slide it up onto the steering column shaft.  This took a little work but I was able to do it by torqueing a large screwdriver with a pair of channel-locks.   The coupling must be completley clear of the steering box.    Out-of-focus in progress and in-focus after completion images below.    Next, disconnect the brake lines from the front struts using a 11mm and 14mm wrenches.  I chose to do disconnet the flex lines from the rigid lines on the struts.  You will need to drain you brake lines if your brake system is intact.  Mine was already partially broken down.  Be prepared for brake fluid in any case.   Oh, and be sure to save the connector pieces (two little pieces of spring steel) that will end up being loose.      Once you get the brake lines disconnected, take the bungee cords, wrap them around the struts and secure them to the suspension underneath.  This will prevent them from dropping against the fender when they come free of the strut tower.    Next, with a 12mm socket, remove the bolts on top of the strut towers.  They will not fall through (yet) and you do not need a spring compressor.   Bag the bolts and washers.    OK, now we get to the fun part!   There are only 6 bolts holding this whole thing on and they are only about 18 inches apart on each side along the bottom of the frame rail. These require a 17mm socket and will probably require the breaker bar to loosen, although once loosened, mine came out very easily.  I suggest that you initially remove the front and back bolts and just loosen the middle one on each side. Note that the front bolt is longer.  There also isn't a lot of clearance to get a socket onto the rear bolt.     With that one bolt still attached on each side, place your floor jack against the crossmember slightly off center a little closer to the steering box.  It might not matter, but I did this in an effort to maintain balance.  Jack it up snug and orient it so you can hold one of the struts as you are lowering it.  Now remove the last two bolts and slowly lower the whole assembly to the ground.  Don't forget to bag and tag the bolts.  Surprise!  It's done!   Leave the bungee cords attached so that the assembly is easier to move without risk of a strut falling over.     The good news is that was pretty easy!  Dirty, of course, but easy.  The bad news is that now I have to dissassemble it, clean paint/powder coat and reassemble everything.  And while it is appart, I will remember to weld a reinfrorcement onto the drivers side motor mount bracket.  All of that will happen on a warmer day.     Many thanks to the BB folks who provided pointers and suggestions!    I will also try to clip this and make a how-to article out of it. (Done! )   Thanks for reading!  

Hodgepodge

Hodgepodge

 

Day 144: Engine and transmission Out!

Funny how all frustration about a project can go away when some big milestone happens.  That was Saturday when I pulled the engine and transmission.  Many people told me that I should do this and that it would not be terribly difficult, especially considering what I had already done to remove most of the auxillary pieces on the engine. Compared to some things I've done to later cars, this was pretty easy!  Unfortunately, I do not have many images of the actual event because I was working by myself and did not want to get my camera all greasy.  There was grease everywhere. (I went through no less than 15 pairs of shop gloves....all of my tools are now coated witha thin layer of grease...)  I'm actually a little embarrased that I don't have more images but I will share what I have.  You can tell where the grease thing got to be too much and the pictures stop.      After reading dozens of threads and notes from folks who recommended pulling the engine, I finally got over the mental block and realized that it was the only way I was going to get the result I want with this car.  Pretty much everything was already disconnected except for the guibo and the tranny/engine mounts, so it wasn't much effort.     I bought a 2-ton engine hoist, the smaller engine leveler, an engine stand and a couple of furniture dollys from Harbor freight and spent about an hour assembling the hoist and stand.  If you buy one of these hoists, be sure to buy some hydraulic oil as the thing comes with only a little oil in it. Mine took about a quart and a half.  Also be sure to put a little axle grease on the inner-rotating portion of the engine stand so it is easier to turn once the motor is on it.   The small HF furniture dolly is the perfect size for placing under the transmission so you can roll it around.      While you are out shopping, stop at Home Depot and buy some foam pipe insulation tubes.  These things come in incredibly handy whenever you have to place your removed hood, trunk or doors on their edges.  Also buy some M8 and M10 bolts, nuts and washers to attach the engine to the engine stand.  I used the starter bolts (M10) and a couple of 80mm M8 bolts.  Use however many washers are needed to tighten the bolts without bottoming out if you use threaded holes on the engine.      Because I was working by myself and I do not have much room, I decided to break everything down as much as possible.  That meant removing the transmission and then taking the engine out of the top of the engine compartment rather than dropping everything down in one piece.  I get that the one piece approach is fewer steps and I might try that when putting everything back, but this was the way I felt I needed to do it to stay safe and comfortable.  I still plan on dropping the front subframe but can do it a little more easily now.    First, I decided to remove the hood.  I am working on the car in a pretty tight space, could not  raise the car as high as I wanted to because of an overhed obstruction and was really getting tired of having to manuever around it to reach anything in the engine compartment.      Here are the steps.  Easy peasy.   The grill should be out so you can get to the hood bolts.  If it isn't, remove it first.    Remove the tortion bar first, starting at the body and using a 2x4 of appropriate length to support the hood.  Scribe the bolts on the body side of the front hinges.   Take pictures of everything!!  You will need them later!    The right side hinge had spacers and a brakcet for the auxiliary a/c fan.     Lower the hood and remove the bolts accessible through the grill opening.   Make a note of how any spacers are used.   Lifting the hood off the car was the only thing I needed a hand with.  My wife had this "Really? Me? Lift that?" look on her face when I asked her to help, but the hood really isn't that heavy.   I temporarly set the hood flat on some empty boxes until I was able to put the pipe insulationon one edge and lean it upright.  The hinges, when down, also work to keep the front of the hood off the floor.       Then, the transmission came out.  There are a couple of very good punch lists for this elsewhere, but I will summarize:     2 notes: The transmission weighs about 70-80 pounds, so it is not terribly difficult to wrestle around or even lift.   I have rubber "topper" covers for all of my jack stands and floor jacks so they don't mar any soft metal or scratch paint.  I highly recommend them.     Jack up the car as high as you are comfortable with and place on jackstands. You will need to jack up both the front and rear of the car as the rear wheels and drive shaft need to be free to spin. Inside the car, remove the shifter, unscrew the 4+ screws holding the shift-boot extension to the console and remove that.  remove the little donut foam piece (mine was gone).   Turn the steering wheel hard to the right to swing the tie rods as far forward as possible.  Under the car, disconnect the speedometer cable, reverse light switch and hydraulic line to the slave cylinder (once you do this, you won't be able to change gears again, so make sure it is in Nuetral).   Unbolt the exhaust mount from the transmission.  Unbolt the exhaust down-tube and set it aside.  (I wanted to remove the exhaust system completly, but the connector by the axle was frozen so I set it to the side and put a jack stand under the front end. (I have a lot of jack stands.)) This is where my punchlist deviated a little from others.   Disconnect the shifter linkage and remove the linkage assembly.  I had a later model car and the assembly differs from that in the Haynes manual.  Mine had a flat C-shaped retainer spring that covered a pin.  Once I figured that out (with the help of folks here on the BB), I was able to disconnect the linkage and remove the shift assembly.  Several bolts were already missing or loose, so this was pretty easy.  There was a splash-guard on the transmission support that prevented me from getting to the guibo bolts.  So I put a jackstand under the transmission and removed the transmission support.    Disconnect the guibo,ideally, so that it remains attached to the driveshaft.  I used two wrenches and used the transmision mount bracket as the stop for one of them. (This is where you need to rotate the driveshaft to get to the guibo bolts) Put a jack stand under the drive shaft and disconnect the center support bearing from the car.  The 2 bolts loosen and are slotted into keys on the body.  Just slide them back until they are free.  support the driveshaft with a jack stand.     Remove the clutch inspection cover (roll under from the front of the car) don't forget the one larger bolt near the slave cylinder.  Roll a floor jack under the transmission to support it and raise it up so it is against the transmission and taking weight.  Note: align the floor jack so it can roll straight back.   Remove the jack stand placed under the transmission earler and place it under the rear of the pan on the engine. (Once the transmission is free, the engine will be balancing on two engine mounts and you don't want it to tilt too far back.)   From the engine bay, work around the top of the bellhousing to remove the bolts securing it.  Once you think youhave all of them, wiggle the housig a little.  If you can see it move, you got all the bolts.  With a scewdriver or similar tool, GENTLY work your way around the bellhousing to push it back away from the engine.  The transmission may rotate a little, which is further confirmation that it is free.   Get back under the car and pull the transmission backwards.  Do NOT lower it yet, just pull it straight back until it seem free.   Once the bellhousing is clear of the tie-rods, you can lower the transmission.  Note that if it rolled onto it's side, it is likely that the transmission tunnel is keeping it from rolling off the floor jack so hold onto it as you lower it.   For me, even holding the transmission, it rolled off the floorjack when almost at the floor and clanked onto the floor.  The clutch pivot and throw-out bearing popped of the transmissionwhen this happend.  Perhaps a strap around the transmission would have prevented this.   Some suggest strapping a small Harbor Freight furniture dolly to the transmission and lowering it with that attached, but I could not figure out how to make that work.  Image showing relatively new guibo, part of support bracket and splash guard thing that I had to remove.  Loose wires are from the reverse light switch.    Center support showing slotted bolts.    What you see once the flywheel access cover is removed.     Looking down at the tranny with the wheel turned hard to the right.  The tie rods are still behind the transmission, but only by an inch or two.  Note the two or three bellhousing bolts visible in this image.     Shift linkage.  For my car, the circled sleeve had a spring-type cover that hides a pin.  You have to pop the sleeve off and manuever the pin out to disconnect the linkage from the transmission.  Somebody put a Urethane bushing on the transmission mount but forgot to tighten anything afterwards.  See the video below to see how loose it was!  Kind of hard to drive that way...     IMG_2400.MOV   Here it is once out.  What a filthy thing!         And finally, the engine came out through the top:   I already had the intake and exhaust manifolds off, all of the cooling lines disconnected, the fuel pump off, the A/C compressor and air pump off, the radiator out and the distributor removed.  In other words, the engine was only connected to the car by the two motor mounts.      Extend the boom of the hoist out to the 1/2 ton mark (i.e. all the way)  The engine weighs less than 1/2 ton and you will need the room. Attach the leveler.  I removed the chain that came with the hoist and attached the leveler directly to the boom using 2 links.  (Use 2 links if you are taking the engine out with the hoist on the side or 3-links if you are taking the engine out from the front.  This way, the leveler will be hang correctly.) My car was jacked up enough to get the hoist under it wth the wheels attached.  You may need to remove a wheel to get the hoist underneath if you are coming at it from the side.   Attach the balancing bar chains to the engine through the eylet above at the starter and through your alternater mounting bracket.  There may be a better place in front because the engine tilts a little, but this is what I used.   Lift the hoist enough to be taking some of the weight of the engine.   Unbolt the motor mounts from the engine.  2 bolts on left and 3 on right.  The engine may shift a little. Adjust the hoist and leveler as needed.  Ok, just lift the engine out and carefully roll it over the side/fron of the car.      Here's how I attached the leveler to the engine.     And here is one showing how I attached the engine to the stand.  It took a few tries to figure this out because one arm on the stand was never quite short enough for this small engine so I had to turn the bracke sideways.      And here is the now empty but still nasty engine compartment!  everything will be coming out of here starting this weekend!      And here is the temporary resting place for the hood and how I used that pipe insulation I mentioned earlier.  That stuff is great for protecting edges!    OK, that's it!     Now I am really excited about removing the front subframe, building a dolly for the car and really starting to get things cleaned up!   There is still a LOT to do before paint, but I feel like there is a decent pace now and I'm no longer crawling along, or worse, waiting.  I am decideing what to do to refresh the engine and whether I should tackle that myself or send it out.  Same with the transmission.  And of course, as always, there are more parts to buy!                                            

Hodgepodge

Hodgepodge

 

Day 120: Emissions controls out, plus more....

4 months.  That's how long I've had this 2002.  And it has been sitting in the garage on jack stands for nearly 3!  The problem I've had is the same problem many of us have had this winter: It's just too damn cold in the garage to work!  Especially with the wife coming and going in her car.    Well, today was a really bad day, weather-wise.  So bad that my wife did not try to go anywhere all day so the garage was relatively warm.  So I took the day and worked on the car a little.  I've been doing a little here and there for the past few months, but today I feel like I accomplished something.  The last of the emissions controls are gone!      Back in November, I discovered that I needed to remove the A/C compressor to get access to the lower exhaust manifold nuts.    In December, I discovered that the A/C compressor support bracket was held in place by two bolts that could only be accessed if you removed the fan.  Of course, removing the fan involved draining and removing much of the cooling system.   Since I also need to replace the water pump, All of the A/C equipment in front of the radiator needed to be removed as well.   And part of the plan has always been to replace a lot of the tired and worn ancillary components, like the alternator, starter, coolant diverter, thermostat, all the hoses, etc.     So out it all came.  That left me with a lot more room to work and a much clearer picture of how much sludge was covering the engine.  Here's an image of the A/C parts I removed, along with the fan, shroud and radiator:     What a boat anchor that A/C compressor is!  No way that's going back in!  New units are 1/2 he size and weight.          Here's an image of the engine bay with those parts removed:    And here is an image through the grill that shows just how much sludge has built up on the engine:   And the sludge isn't just on the front of the engine or even just the engine. It is all over the front end of the car.     In January, I was able to take a day to continue working on removing the emissions control stuff.   I removed the alternator, the air pump (Which I was able to drop through the bottom of the engine bay after removing one of the support brackets), and finally, the reactor.  Funny thing about the reactor, though.  As I disconnected the downpipe from the reactor, I noticed that some coolant leaked out of the engine.  Wouldn't have noticed except that it leaked onto me.  The angle of the engine had changed a little.  Then when I disconnected the downpipe from the chassis, there was more coolant.  And finally, when I was pulling the reactor, I could not get it to clear the studs so I could remove it from the engine bay.  So I put a wooden block on my floor jack and went under the car to loosen the passenger side engine mount.  That's when I discovered.....the motor mount was not attached to the engine!   It was completely loose!   The only thing holding the engine up on the passenger side was the exhaust system!  I didn't have the necessary M10 bolts, so I had to leave the engine jacked up until I could get some.  Here's what it looked like with the engine jacked up slightly.  Note the missing motor mount bolts. More sludge, too.   I replaced the bolts, washers and wave washers supporting the mount today.  I have new mounts, but will wait until the engine is clean to install them.     Oh.  Part of the article I will eventually write about emissions control removal will include that you can safely remove the bracket below.  What a massive, stupid piece of metal just to support an air pump!      That brings us pretty much up to today.  Today, I removed the emissions control wiring harness and remaining relays, disconnecting the harness from underneath fuse number 12 on the fuse box.  The collection of removed parts is impressive.    All that is left to do that is associated with the emissions control removal is to wire a lead from the fusebox under fuse 12 over to the condenser coil.  That should conclude the emissions control removal portion of the program...well...except for the intake manifold.....     ===========================================================   My original goal with the emissions control removal was to do JUST THAT and then put everything back together so I can run the engine again.  That was before I discovered all of the other systems I had to remove to get the reactor and air pump and now the intake manifold out.  Somewhere along the line, I came to the realization that it made no sense to put the engine back together and make necessary adjustments to run it until I had it cleaned the engine, and identified and fixed the leaks.  So I've been removing parts and cleaning a little as I go.  I also decided to replace the bulky, swiss cheese intake manifold with one of the more compact and less perforated versions from Ireland Engineering.  I really need to remove the old one anyway so I can clean under it.  Here is where I am now.    I pulled a lot of cooling, vacuum and breather hoses today, too.  Some of these lines, like that gold braided brake booster vacuum hose line, are original to the car!  I had to break a lot of original BMW crimps and clamps today.  And almost every hose except the fuel line was brittle and broke as I was removing it.  If ever there was a car that could demonstrate how important it is to maintain and replace hoses, this car was it.     Notice that you can actually see the engine now with most of the sludge gone, but only on top.....here's an image of under the intake manifold from the front.  See all that sludge?  And those nuts are a pain.....     And finally here is an image of the shiny new manifold that arrived from Ireland Engineering (Well...except for the grease marks that somebody put on it before I got it....)        So today I secured the passenger side engine mount to the engine, finished removing the emissions control stuff, continued cleaning everything, removed the flow diverter on the block and pulled the carburetor.     I stopped today because I need a 1/4 inch universal joint for my socket to get the intake manifold off.  I'll get one of those in the next couple of days and get the manifold off so I can continue cleaning and, hopefully, isolate the oil leaks.  I suspect they are just coming from the valve and timing chain covers, but I won't know for sure for a while.     Next I'll finish removing the intake manifold and will probably remove other components from the engine and engine bay in order to clean it all up.  Then I'll pull the valve and timing chain covers to replace the gaskets.     Oh, and the master cylinder is leaking, that is on the list, too.  In fact, I have replacement parts or rebuilds planned for almost the entire brake system.  That will be another chapter.                 

Hodgepodge

Hodgepodge

 

Day 40: Finally getting started.

I was finally in a position to set an entire day aside to work on the 2002 today. (Well, really about 4 hours.)  The first item on the agenda was removing the reactor/exhaust manifold and installing a new header as part of removing the emissions controls.  I will try to make an article out of this emissions control removal process.  But not today because, you know, gauntlets.     Today I discovered 3 things:  1) The Previous owner or his mechanic tried to remove the manifold/reactor before.  2 of the 4 upper bolts were actually loose and all 4 lower bolts that you access from under the car were stripped. I should have known something was up when all of the nuts to the heat shields came off so easily.   2) You can't get a pair of vice-grips onto the nuts under the manifold because there isn't enough room.  Why?  Because my car has A/C and the huge compressor sits under the manifold.  3) You can't remove the compressor without removing a lot of other components.  The compressor bolts are not accessible and the compressor bracket bolts attach immediately behind the fan.  A couple of compressor bracket bolts were missing, meaning I'm following in the PO's (or his bad mechanic's) footsteps.   4) Normally, to get to the water pump for example, you can pull the radiator, remove the grill and go through the front of the car with a long ratchet extension. I thought maybe I'd do this since I have to replace the water pump anyway.  Nope, the A/C condenser and an auxiliary fan sit in front of the radiator.     So one way or another, I'm going to have to pretty much remove the entire A/C system from the car before I can finish with the manifold/reactor/header.     Oh, and I think I mentioned earlier how bad the fluid leaks are.  I spent a full day cleaning the engine from above, but I completely neglected to get underneath.  There is anywhere from 1/8 of an inch to 1/2 of an inch of congealed oil covering the bottom half of the engine and all of the front suspension components.  Now it looks like I'm going to have to clean everything by hand and I won't know where the leaks are until I get a few more parts off the car and the block cleaned up.      Here's a shot showing the A/C compressor and the lack of space to get anything bigger than a box wrench into the space by the manifold. No way a pair of Vice Grips will fit up there. Note the missing bracket bolt from somebody's prior attempt to remove it.        Here are the compressor mounting bolts up by the fan.      Here's the A/C condenser and auxiliary fan in front of the radiator.    And this image pretty much sums up how far I got today.  Heat shields off, a couple of connections off, that's it.  I put the plug wires back on to avoid damaging them.     So I did not get as far as I had hoped today.  That's pretty normal.  There is one small silver lining to all this.  While I was under the car, I found the Weber air cleaner cover C-clip that the previous owner lost a long time ago.  It was embedded in about 1/4 inch of oil sludge. If the engine had been clean, this would have bounced out ages ago.              

Hodgepodge

Hodgepodge

 

Day 31: The OZ wheels arrived from Budapest

The OZ wheels I ordered arrived from Budapest.  I thought they were coming from Vienna, Austria, but I guess somebody was confused about that whole World War One Austria-Hungary thing.  These wheels were packed really really well and they look awesome.  I am going to have a hard time deciding which set to use on the car, these or the euro weaves.  I still need to take the weaves over to my reconditioning guy.  The weaves came with a set of tires, so I'll mount tires on two OZ and two reconditioned weaves to see what they look like.  I'm also going to have to spend some time figuring out what spacers I'm going to need, if any.  Image of the wheels below.           

Hodgepodge

Hodgepodge

 

Day 28: Still waiting on parts...and some space

I've been travelling and tied up with other projects and have not had a chance to start working on the 2002 but I'm almost, almost, almost ready to begin work.  Most of the parts I ordered have arrived.  I figured an image of all the stuff going into the car is in order, and laying it all out helps me get organized.  I also wanted to identify duplicates (there are a few duplicates for various reasons....).    So here are some of the parts I'll be working with over the next couple of months.           Arrived so far (in image):   All new cooling system components (water pump, thermostat, silicone hoses, belts) except for the radiator, which I will evaluate when I pull.  I do no think I will be putting the fan shroud back on.  A new alternator (and bushings) and voltage regulator New plugs A new header as part of the emissions-control removal (2 headers, actually...)    New cloth braided fuel and vacuum lines All new brake components including pistons, drums, discs, calipers, pads and flexible lines.  I'll examine the hard lines once I start on this.  All new suspension components including bushings, struts, shocks, springs, mounting hardware and sway bars. New World Upholstery seat covers and new seat back/release/hinge cover hardware.  A shifter rebuild kit That foam pedal cover so I don't see the road through the pedal box anymore.  New door hardware (gaskets, inside handles, some knobs)  A new passenger side mirror (none on car originally)  A lot of gaskets (Valve cover, timing chain cover, manifold, etc.)  Motor mounts  Nuts, bolts, studs, wave washers.... New badges and emblems.  (I can't stand seeing a BMW with faded badges or bent emblems.  It's like wearing a suit but having dirty shoes.)  A few of the many stickers that I will be replacing when I paint.    One of the two sets of wheels I purchased.  (The other set is coming from Austria....no idea when it will get here.)   A custom Noah car cover from the Cover Store.   These covers are really terrific and they use the same material that BMW uses on their branded covers.   I have 4 or 5 of these.       A few things are on their way:   A new OEM valve cover because I'm pretty sure mine is warped. Carpet from Esty.  No hurry on that as it will be a while before I am ready for it.   I ordered some single-stage acrylic Urethane (I think) paint in Polaris Silver to paint the under-body and engine compartment.     A few things I still need to deal with/purchase: Rear differential gasket, once I confirm I need one.  All of the aluminum trim on the car, once I pull it all off.   A brake master cylinder rebuilt kit and possibly a brake booster (Something in there is leaking pretty bad)   A steering box rebuild kit, possibly. Drive train components, once I evaluate them. (Guibo, CV joints, wheel bearings, etc.)  Distributor, condenser, spark plug wires, etc.  Considering a 123/Tune+    All of the exterior trim strips.      The To-Do list is forming: 1.  The first order of business is relatively simple, but important in the grand scheme of things.  I need to fix the fuel line leak/flow issue so that the car starts right up when I turn it over.  Knowing it should start right up will help a lot when dealing with other systems (if it doesn't)   2.  Then I'll tackle the emissions control items. 3.  Replace the water pump, thermostat and related components   4.  Replace brake components  5.  Evaluate drive train components   Those of you who are Project Management people know that this is a rolling wave process.   Detail is high in the immediate tasks, not so high right now in the more distant tasks, with future-task detail increasing as current tasks are completed.   Overall, I first want to eliminate and clean up after any and all fluid leaks and get the engine running optimally. Then I need to address the suspension/drive train and determine how/what/when I want to paint the under body and engine compartment.   I'm not really set up to pull the engine, drive train and front/rear sub frames but haven't completely eliminated the idea.  And there is soda blasting to be done to expose rust and remove a really awful Maaco paint job from 1985.      Today I rented a two car storage space and will be storing my Alfa and one of the other convertibles in that for the winter.  This will give me a little more room in this garage to work.        Stay tuned!      Scott                                     

Hodgepodge

Hodgepodge

 

Day 6: Up on the rack

Today I took the car over to my regular mechanic, who put it up on a rack so I could look underneath.  We poked and prodded and looked around for rust and leaks.  Almost no rust.  Three areas that will need to be addressed: a small rust spot in the box-beam between the gas spout and the gas tank, a quarter sized spot in the front quarter panel in front of the drivers door and a slightly larger spot on the passenger side of the front air dam under the bumper.  Wow.  Lots of grime and oil, but no other rust.     As for leaks, there were a LOT.    1.  The driver's side axle hub was leaking brake fluid from a place that didn't look like it should be leaking anything.  This is probably from bad drum brake piston seals.  Since the brakes are weak anyway, I'm ordering new cylinders rather than just a seal kit.  Ray pointed out new cylinders for $20 each at BluntTech, which is about what the rebuild kits cost elsewhere. (Thank you, Ray!)  I also bought new flexible brake lines from Ireland Engineering.  I'll take a good look at the original steel hard brake lines when I get under there to clean things.  Many people upgrade to the 250mm brake drums from the original 230 but I'm not going to do this just yet.   2. The differential is leaking. It is possible that this is just oil trailing back from the engine, but I don't think so.  3. The brake master cylinder and/or the brake booster are leaking.  That should be fun.   4. The lower oil pan gasket seems to be leaking.  The good news is that I won't have to drop any of the suspension to get to this like I would have to with my newer BMWs.  The bad news is I don't have a lift so I'll be doing this under jackstands.  Messy!    5. The valve cover gasket is leaking.  Of course it is.  6. The timing chain cover gasket may be leaking.  I'm going to just clean that area up and replace the valve cover gasket at first.  I'll need to pull the valve cover off again if the timing chain cover IS leaking, but that' not the end of the world.   7. The water pump is leaking.  Yes, the water pump is bad and needs to be replaced.  I hope it comes with a gasket.   8. Something around the oil filter is leaking.  In newer BMWs, the oil filter housing is attached to the engine and the gasket commonly goes bad.  I'm not sure what the deal is with this engine because I don't think there is a separate housing.  I'll look once I get the area cleaned up.        As if all those leaks aren't enough, there were a few mechanical issues as well.    1. Gearbox linkage.  The gearbox linkage has a lot of play in it and something slams against the transmission tunnel when shifting.  In 4th, I can pull back on the stick a little and feel the linkage rubbing against the drive shaft.  I started a thread to solicit suggestions. This will be interesting to fix.    2. Pedal box cover missing.  It is really strange being able to look down at the accelerator and seeing straight through to the ground. Very Flinstone.  A foam cover is missing...at least.    3. External speaker wire?  The previous owner ran wires for the whopping 4 inch speakers on the back deck along the OUTSIDE of the car.  Clear, gold and silver stranded wire like what you would use in the house.  See picture below.  4. CV boots split.  Yup. normal.   5. Steering box play.  Most of the suspension bushings were surprisingly tight, but the steering box has a little play in it.  That will be interesting to fix...   6. Bounce, bounce, bounce.  The original, original shocks, struts and springs turn the car into a bit of a bounce house inside.   I've already ordered Bilstein B6 struts and shocks and will be ordering Ireland Engineering stage 1 springs.  This should also lower the car about a.5 inches.  7. The steel wheel fronts look great, but the backs are rusty.  I'm planning to put new wheels on the car, but want to keep these. Hopefully they can be reconditioned.           The missing pedal box insulating cover.  Oil, oil everywhere!       The front edge of this box beam has a hole in it.  This is a really common rust area in all BMWs.     Greas and grime on the CV joints.  Note the odd clean spot on the axle caused by the...SPEAKER WIRE!  Hanging down.  Wow.  Also note the very wet brake drum housing.  Bad piston seals.  Oddly, most of the bushings seem to be in decent shape, but I'm going to replace them all anyway.  Lots of work, but the increase in driving confidence will be worth it.       The odd loose shifter linkage issue. Clunking the tunnel and rubbing against the drive shaft.  I started a thread on this.  Should be interesting to fix....     Leaking differential, I think.  This might be oil trailing back from up front.  I'll tackle this much later, although I absolutely want to change the diff fluid soon.  There is no record of that being done. I'll bet it smells horrible!          Up front, the oil pan looks new!  No oil under it either but there is some along the trailing edge.  

Hodgepodge

Hodgepodge

 

Day 3: Starting the clean-up

Today, I took the car over to the self-service car-wash and sprayed the engine compartment with foamy engine bright...several times.  It made a reasonable difference but there were decades of oil and grime on this engine.   Normally, I would have covered the distributor, carb and condenser, but they were all covered with oil too, so I just shot the whole thing and figured I could wait for it all to dry if the car didn't start.  It started and it smelled like a tar pit for the trip home.     My wife then gave the car a basic wash and emptied everything out of the car so she could vacuum it.  The horsehair-straw from the seats actually clogged up the vacuum cleaner.      The engine now looks much cleaner, but there is still sludge everywhere.  Note the air filter bellows and cold-air diverter have been removed.          I ordered all the parts needed to remove the pollution control equipment, replace the valve cover gasket and replace all the hoses and belts.  I also ordered a new water pump and alternator.  In the picture above, you may be able to tell that the old alternator is slightly out of alignment with the fan.  I'm not sure how that is even possible and will figure it out when I remove it.        

Hodgepodge

Hodgepodge

 

Day 2: The before pictures.

Today, after taking the car over to the tag and title place still on the trailer and then returning the trailer,  I pulled the car out of the garage and took "before" pictures of everything I could.  You can NEVER take too many before pictures of a car you are restoring.  They will be your puzzle box for putting it back together.  You can't put the car back together correctly if it isn't already reasonably correct (which is why you want an unmodified car) and you can't use the images of the car as a puzzle box if you didn't take the pictures.   Take a boatload of pictures!  Include every sticker, hose, clamp and bolt.     I also took the car for a brief drive around the neighborhood.  The engine runs pretty well but the brakes are weak and something in the shifter clunks into the side of the transmission tunnel.  And the car is leaking fluid.  An astronaut removing his helmet in space wouldn't leak this much fluid.  I see oil, brake fluid and coolant.  When I shut off the car, a plume of oil and steam rose from under the hood like the car was on fire.  Valve cover gasket.....definitely.   And water pump. All new hoses and belts.  The list begins.         The larger box holds the rear seatback purchased from World Upholstery in 2012.  The box on the right contains various fluids, a Haynes manual and a copy of "The Time-Life Book of the Family Car" from 1973.     2 things:  First, that is a Weber 32/36 DGV carb that the oriiginal owner had installed in June, 2000 (Surprise! Not original but completely welcome!)  Second, Do you see that bellows by the hood hinges?  Some of you may recognize that as the cold air intake hose for the original air filter housing.  It has been sitting there in that exact spot since June of 2000!       The yellowing of the paint in the engine compartment, after considerable discussion with the knowledgeable folks here, is apparently the original 1975 clear coat.  It scrapes off fairly easily and will have to be completely removed before the car is repainted.     

Hodgepodge

Hodgepodge

 

Day 1: A drive to New Jersey

Early on the morning of Tuesday, October 10th, I started up my Dodge Ram 1500 toy hauler, left my home outside of Pittsburgh and headed off to New Jersey to look at and probably pick-up my new project, a 1975 BMW 2002.  It was about a 5 hour drive. The plan was to drive to Allentown, PA, pick up a U-Haul car carrier and, since the banks were closed Monday, pick up the cash needed to pay for this car.  I chose Tuesday because it was between storms. Hurricane Nate had not yet made it this far north.  I got to Allentown and went into one of the two PNC branches there to get money out of my account. "You want this in cash?" Yes. "All of it?" Yes. "Normally, you need to call us a day in advance because we don't have this much cash in the bank."  Oh. (I have cashed much larger checks than this at my branch in Pittsburgh and nobody ever batted an eye.)   Brief wait.  "My manager says we can do this, but it will have to be in $50s.  Is that OK?"   It wasn't like I had a choice....  "Yes, that's fine."  Apparently, in order to ensure that the tellers don't make any mistakes, the bank has a "Bank Vault ATM" that counts out money to give to them.  Once this happened, the tellers had to count the money 6 or 7 times because the money counters were broken and they were all miscounting by $50. After a brief panic, $50 was found stuck in the counter, which the teller tried even though it was broken.  20 minutes after entering the bank, I was on my way to the Uhaul rental about 2 miles away.   Tip: ALWAYS rent car carrier trailers from a Uhaul Moving and Storage shop, not a "neighborhood" shop.  The Moving and Storage places have more resources in case something is wrong with the trailer.  Another tip: NEVER try to rent a car carrier trailer at the very end of or beginning of the month.  Every apartment renter on the planet is trying to move that week and the rental counter line will stretch out the door.  I've done this "pick up a car-carrier trailer there" thing several times and it works well as long as it isn't a month end.     The car was advertised on Autotrader classics and, unlike nearly all of the other BMW 2002s listed, this one was both reasonably priced and a one-family car.  The pictures were not great, but I could tell that the car had potential and the conservative colors, silver with a marine blue interior, was exactly what I wanted.   According to the seller, it was nearly rust free.  The gentleman was helping to sell the car for his wife, who inherited the car from her father when he passed away in 2005 or 2006.  The car was listed as complete, original and rust free but needing some work. Since my plan was to completely restore the car, an untouched original was the best possible choice.        I hauled the trailer up the long, relatively narrow drive to the house, met the husband and looked over the car, which was sitting outside a separate garage area where it had probably spent the last 11 years.   It really was rust free.  Looking over the entire car, I only found 2 small rust spots about the size of a quarter and that was it. My paint gauge confirmed one respray and no bondo on the car that I could find.  The dash looked great with no cracks at all and the interior looked original except for a new cover on the back seat bottom. (The rest of the back seat cover, purchased from World Upholstery in 2012, was still in a box in the trunk.)  The paint looked OK, but it was dull and splotchy.  That was fine since I knew I would be repainting it.  It was actually an original Maaco paint job from 1985.  I knew this  because the seller provided me with every single maintenance record and receipt, including an oil change diary, since the car was purchased new in 1976!  Every single record!              The gentleman and I talked, I got a little history on the car, I met the wife, we signed the title and the bill of sale I brought and he counted the wrapped stacks of $50 bills I brought from the bank.  Soon I was on my way home with another winter project.  

Hodgepodge

Hodgepodge