Blogs

Seats (Again...)

So first thing is first. I mounted the other seat in the car. I'm about 75% happy with them currently because of the mounting situation. The Corn's seats themselves are fantastic, but I sit too close to the steering wheel still, and the generic Sparco brackets don't fit great in the cabin. It works for now, but I'm looking into revising this ASAP. 
 
I feel like 90% of this thread has been seat updates, but I guess it is what it is. I'm looking into seat belt solutions right now, as the stock ones don't play so nice with these seats. You guys were right, and I've decided no roll bar is the way to go. But I'll likely still need to go with some kind of harness bar, if I can't make a normal seatbelt system work. So I'm trying to find a solution that is reversible for that. As always, I need to complain about the carpet color. I'm going to source some new black carpet. I test dyed a scrap piece of carpet I cut, and it did not work well at all. It comes out crusty, and nasty looking. Perhaps a dye solution where I submerged the carpet would be fine, but spray on does not work well at all. I think at this stage I'm just going to bite the bullet and buy a new carpet kit. 
 
I also keep getting this reoccuring vacuum leak. This hose keeps popping off, no matter how I clamp it down. I had a similar issue on my E30 back in the day, but replacing the clamp solved the issue. Not so much here. Maybe I just need to tighten it down like a man 

Last but not least, a bit of shameless self-promotion. Another reason the 2002 hasn't gotten as much attention as I would like, is I've been in the process of launching a new business. I wouldn't mention it if it wasn't relevant to my car. We're selling Christmas ornaments, key chains, shirts and so on. But it's all based on the cars we are passionate about. This is the only mention I'll make of it here, because my build thread isn't going to become an advert for my products, but we worked hard and I wanted to share the final results with you all. 
 




It goes without saying the 2002 is my favorite of the bunch. We're starting with these 5 cars, and have plans to expand next year. If it does well, I'll have that much more in the budget for the Roundie . You can find this stuff and more at Speed Limitless.

And now back to our regularly scheduled programming. I'm waiting for Black Friday to order in all my bushings. Restoration Design is still making my new differential cross member, so I haven't been able to take the car to the body shop yet. And my fabricator is still finishing other projects and hasn't been able to make my new core support yet. So there has been a whole lot of waiting going on. I may attempt the brakes again this weekend, as I finally have all the parts on the shelf for those. I hope.

benzintinte

benzintinte

 

Question on the steering system

I am trying to build a plan to have this car running and driving for the Hot Rod Power Tour this year, or at least the Woodward Dream Cruise in August.  From looking at my turn radius I need to shorten the front steering arms for the rack and pinion travel to work.     The question I have is, is it a horrible idea to drill the stock arm for a shorter arm?  I plan to use heim joints with a through bolt and spacer.    https://www.bmw2002faq.com/forums/topic/55716-shortening-pitman-arms/?page=2   This is from another FAQ thread, the one I based my e21 rack on.  The more I have thought about this the more i do not like the idea of cutting and welding the steering arm.  The through bolt i would use is similar to the 2002 in shaft size.  That would leave me with roughly the same cross section of material on either side of the hole. In my mind this is less risky than the cut and weld.   The reason for the change is simply because the rack i have does not have enough travel to give me the same steering angle as stock.  Before it's asked i have to go to a rack to gain clearance for the engine swap. 

maikell77

maikell77

 

M2

This sweet '76 found me needing a new home and someone to take care of it. I headed to CA with a buddy just as the monstrous fire started to destroy Paradise (I grew up just down the hill from there.) It started, ran, drove and the price was close enough so we loaded it on the trailer and headed back to CO.   It's a '76 with a rather complete e30m3 swapped into it, including AC, power steering, cruise control, subframes, suspension, brakes, everything.  They even relocated the strut tops for the m3 struts to have the proper castor angle.   It still needs a lot of love, like finishing some bodywork, paint, a complete interior, things like that. I'm thinking about box fenders instead of the flares that are on there. Maybe paint it white with the 3 color stripes over the top like the Group A m3... Maybe just spray clear over the top of what's there now. Don't know, but i do need to go through it mechanically first...   So here area few pictures to get started...

irdave

irdave

Passenger floor pan replacement

So today I finally got my passenger floor pan tacked in place after a while of measuring and trimming the area I cut out. I prefer to cut small and slowly get larger for tight seams when butt welding. I had such a tight fit in most areas i couldn't even use my butt weld clamps which is always nice. After tacking the corners in place, a little light hammer work to make sure things were lining up properly followed by some more tacks and she is in! Now for the tedious process of slowly finishing the welds. As anyone who has done body work before knows, it is a slow process to ensure proper cooling to avoid warpage. Not the hardest job but definitely time consuming. Hopefully ill be finishing up next week! time for a beer, Cheers.   P.S. check out the back story on my blog as it was my first entry, didn't realize how this all worked until now, and has all the pictures and story of my build!

twinnr1523

twinnr1523

 

DIY evaporator

Last winter project.   Bought this evaporator:  https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00HGJCYDE/ref=oh_aui_search_detailpage?ie=UTF8&psc=1 Expansion valve:  https://www.ebay.com/itm/For-2003-2004-Ford-Expedition-A-C-Expansion-Valve-Rear-47398ZB-Expansion-Valve-/292766864272?hash=item442a43d390 Fabricated the sheet metal.  The vent was salvaged from a Behr unit.  Fans was a largest SPAL pusher that could be fitted into the available space (5.2").  Added a PWM fan controller.  

Tsingtao_1903

Tsingtao_1903

 

rear brake work

Unfortunately, I haven't had the time to work on my 02 as often as I would like, but over the past week or so I have managed to make the time I needed to work on my rear brakes which have been needing replacing.
Both wheel cylinders have been leaking so I began to figure out what I wanted to do.
After looking at the options of rebuilding my rear brakes with the OEM tii parts or doing a possible rear disk brake upgrade, I decided to go with the OEM tii setup. I went with this because if I upgraded the rear brakes I would need to do the same with the front for it to match, and it didn't seem like the best financial decision at the time to go with new disks for each wheel.

  The wheel cylinder leaking ended up getting on the brake pads, which were worn and needed replacing soon regardless I still need to file down the edge of the new brake shoes on the bottom and top edge, as well as bleed the brakes after replacing the wheel cylinders.

This was my first time working on brakes so the first side (passenger side) took far longer than the second side (drivers).
I had difficulty reinstalling the spring but after some trial and error, I found that clamping each shoe in place and using vice-grips to wrestle the spring into place was the best option to get it seated correctly. .         Next on my list, I will be swapping out shocks, maybe springs, or just going with coilovers instead. But I will need to do some more research first to make a proper decision on this, I'm not certain what springs I have at the moment, how long of a wait I should expect for Bilstein B8 front strut inserts/ rear shocks to be back in stock, and don't know pretty much anything for the coilover option.

I'm SpaghetTii

I'm SpaghetTii

It Works? !!!!

So it is in and works.   But I can't tell how well it works because the Linx cable linkage that I modified sucks.  The gas pedal is more like an on-off switch, very sticky.  I haven't drifted the car so much in my life.  Genuinely entertaining, but quite harry at the same time, especially in downtown traffic.    So I am in the midst of getting some bits made so I can use my sweet sweet heim joints.   I am copying what Australian Vespa Guy did with an L bracket thing mounted to the brake booster.   I have attached the first start video, but the linkage sticks, so the TPS hangs at 1% about half of the time (no closed loop learning), so setting the idle is useless until I straighten out the linkage.    Kind regards and thank you all for your support.  Much more to come.    First Start.m4v                  

Dudeland

Dudeland

Hilton Head Concours Saturday Car Club Showcase

The BMW Classic CCA Lowcountry Discovery is coming to it's end. Saturday the weather was clear and cool. We caravanned over to the Point Royal Golf Course and were parked along the 18th fairway. I cleaned and polished all the road grime and water spots off so he would look his best. Celebrating 40 years of M1s saw, Lance White's red & Procar, Bobby Rahal's white, Dirk de Groen's dark blue, Scott & Fran Hughe's orange and BMW NA's Procar It was an impressive display to say the least. Several members of the club received Crescent Awards which were People's Choice Awards. Doug Dolan won with his 1972 3.0CSi with an S38 motor, Jim & Charlie Van Orsdol with their 1973 Bavaria while Jim & Mary True took the Grand Prize of Best European Car with their 1934 309.    It was a wonderful day and so glad we could attend.  

adawil2002

adawil2002

Repent and Ye will be saved

Ok, so I put in an MSD 6A a while ago, I was in a bit of hurry with the intent of coming back later and tidying it up after I knew that it would work.   So now is the time I fixed it up.   Here is what I pulled out of it.   I know I am not the only one to have done something to come back and fix up later... but still what a pile of shit job I did.   Everything is now soldered, shrink wrapped, taped and zip tied.    I am off to finish the wiring today, purge the fuel lines to get the residue of rubber out of them from putting the ends  Perhaps the first start today although I have a meeting that I can't avoid that will eat up some time.   Also, I took the opportunity to remove the wiring for the smog stuff.                 

Dudeland

Dudeland

Rear Wheel Bearing Number 2

As some of you will recall, on the way to Mid America '02 Fest. I had to have my passenger side rear wheel bearing replaced. Well had it fail after between 7,500 & 8K miles. This time I while on the BMW Classic CCA Lowcountry Discovery Tour. After calling around to a few places and setting up an appointment, I sent Mario an e-mail. He texted me Karl Troy, European Road & Racing, call him. Karl was very personable when I called and explained the situation. I arrived at 12:15 and Vern was immediately taken in. Diagnosis, bad right wheel bearing. Luckily a local parts supplier had the bearings & seals in stock and was just 2 miles away! The outer race had welded itself to the hub, and took a bit of time to remove. I was on the road by 5pm. I was very impressed with Karl and his shop.   Now the big question is why did the last one fail so quickly?  Bent stub axle? Bad bearing from Walloth-Nesch?  

adawil2002

adawil2002

Body Modifications

While I was refreshing the car, I wanted to make some changes to the body.  While at the body shop for the floor repair, I had them close the impact bumper holes and shave off the reflector lights.  I installed a chrome rear bumper,  a set of euro turn signals and some nicer belt line trim.  These were all extra/spare from my 73tii project that weren't good enough to put on that car.  I went with a pair of driving lights and mounting brackets from Kooglewerks.  I like the end result and I didn't get too carried away with paint and body to deviate from my objective.

Djthom

Djthom

Interior Refurbishment

The interior had its good points and its low points.  The good news was the door and rear interior panels and front seat covers were in excellent condition.  The dash had the usual crack, but only the one crack and otherwise good shape.  The low points were the rear seat covers, carpet and most significantly, all of the seat pads were discriminating.    I started with a new carpet kit over the freshly painted interior.  I ordered new rear seat covers from Aardvark.   I purchased polyurethane foam and restuffed all of the seats.  While i had the front seats apart, I installed seat heaters for those non-snowy winter days.   The end result is a freshened and comfortable interior.

Djthom

Djthom

Necessary Repairs

The car was fairly solid in the key areas.  One significant issue was there had been a mouse nest under the backseat which resulted in a hole in the floor behind the driver seat.   There was also some rot in the trunk as a result around the fuel tank support.  A new floor panel came with the car, so I had that installed and new metal put into the trunk in the required areas.    I stripped the interior and trunk, disinfected and cleaned everything, addressed any surface rust with Eastwood converter, and then covered everything with POR 15.    Mechanically the car was pretty good.  I replaced the ebrake cables and the rear brake cylinders.   The rad wasn't in great condition, so i also replaced that also.  The shifter was  sloppy, so I replaced the pins and bushings to tighten everything up.

Djthom

Djthom

Project Rationale

Over the past several years I identified a gap in my garage - a driver level classic that can be enjoyed on a daily basis.  Having 3 kids has limited how often I can find time to take out my MG.  Concern over conditions ranging from weather to security has meant not using the MG or 911.  The 73 02tii I'm restoring will be in the same camp - too nice to take out in inclement weather or where there is a possibility of damage.   My solution?  Acquire a solid 02 driver level and transform it into a reliable 3+ season driver that can be enjoyed daily regardless of the forecast or where it will be parked (within reason)   My search ended at the end of a remote gravel road in a barn in a collection alongside a Ferrari 330 and Austin Healey 100-4

Djthom

Djthom

Progress

The fuel pump is in and wired, 02 sensor is installed. Coolant system buttoned up.    Return line completed.  I have a -6 header fitting, but no space on the fuel pickup to put it, so I plumbed in the return to the breather pipe that the California cars have in the tank.   Not a permanent solution (I promise).   I am taking it first thing to my fabricator to install the 02 bung properly, and I will have him put in the -6 header when I am at it.  And have him check everything over to make sure it is safe.    Wires are through the firewall, and it seems like a spaghetti monster has exploded under the dash.   I cleaned up the smog stuff, but am hesitant to take it all off, just in case there is something crucial there. I will have to read through the posts for de-smogging.   I will likely clean up the wires going to the MSD, as I was using the original coil wire (sans resistor).    I got the wrong sensor adaptor for the carb, so will have to make due and get a -6 to -6 male to accommodate the fuel pressure sensor.    The carb is just sitting there.  I need different bolts, as the plate kit came with SAE instead of metric screws to go into the intake.   The linkage is looking super easy to fabricate, with a couple of heim joints and threaded rod,  so I don't think I will need the Linx wire linkage.   So getting closer, perhaps I test fire by the weekend   Enjoy                          

Dudeland

Dudeland

 

2018 Catchup #3 - Engine Bay Cleanup

After I pulled the engine last year, I started stripping the engine bay.   As usual, I went to the forum for advice: https://www.bmw2002faq.com/forums/topic/205378-engine-bay-rustpaintcleanup-questions-lots/   My original plan was to epoxy primer it all and then paint back to factory color.  Then it got too cold to paint, and the car sat over winter.   And then the engine bay rusted up...again.   How the engine bay looked after pulling the engine last year:     Inka + unknown orange + overspray + black paint + grease + dirt + rust   I stripped most of it off, then let it sit over winter.  This year, it was like this:   After some wire wheeling:   Fot the nooks/crannies, I got a harbor freight gravity feed blaster gun, filled it with baking soda (several times), and blasted those areas.   Since the weather was starting to get cold again, I went with the quickie option, Rustoleum rattle can primer and paint.  It's nowhere near the color the car is currently painted, which isn't Inka, but looks waaaaaay better than it did.   Got the subframe and suspension back in, and applied some Hushmat to the firewall:   I didn't take any more pictures after this, but the car is offically OFF THE JACKSTANDS again.  Calipers/Rotors/Brake Lines were installed, Rims mounted, and it's now a roller again.   More to come!

xr4tic

xr4tic

 

2018 Catchup #2 - Rust Repair

September rolled around, the car has been on jackstands for a year, and I knew if I didn't get the rust repair finished, I'd never get this car back together.   So what do you do when you have no welding experience and have lots of questions?  Post to the forum!   Lots of good advice here and some inspiration pictures from other members: https://www.bmw2002faq.com/forums/topic/225875-floorpan-frame-rail-replacement-questions/   Armed with knowledge, time to get this rustball rolling.   Here's what I started with:       The floorpan had been "patched" by a previous owner very poorly, I ripped that out.  The frame extension was completely rotted, the lower inner rocker was rotted, and the the area below the pedal box was completely gone.   Removing the old rotted areas:     Fabbing a new inner rocker patch from 16 gauge steel:   Welded in:   Lower firewall/below pedal box:   Mocked up, using the pedal box to help locate it:   Welded in + the frame rail extension in place:   W&N floor pan welded in, I did screw up and left too big a gap at the rear.  I ended up filling it with weld with the help of a magnetic copper backer   Seam sealer over the welds and gaps, and then covered in leftover rustoleum from the engine bay:   Cleaned the entire wheel well and then coated it with Rustoleum undercoating:

xr4tic

xr4tic

 

2018 Catchup #1 - Front End Rebuild

I pulled the engine out of my car in the fall of 2017.  Shortly after I started stripping the engine bay, pulled the subframe and suspension, planning to paint everything.   Fast forward a year later to September, the engine bay is still not painted, the floorpan/frame rail is still not repaired, and the car has been on jackstands for a year.   However, during the summer, I did rebuild the front suspension: IE Engine Mount Brace welded in Subframe powdercoated IE Urethane Bushings Volvo Calipers E21 Hubs + Rotors Bilstein Shocks H&R Springs (came with car) IE Offset Roll Center Spacer IE Fixed Front Camber Plates New Ball Joints/Tie-Rods/Center Link Rebuilt Steering Box All parts Epoxy coated + Eastwood Chassis Black   Picture time!   Welding in the IE engine mount brace (excuse the crappy looking welds, 2nd time welding ever)   Sandblasting the original parts/cleanup (Harbor freight bench cabinet)   Eastwood epoxy primer applied   Realized it wasn't fun painting these on the ground, so I built a frame out of PVC to hang them up   Installing idler arm bushings in the powdercoated subframe   Subframe with bushings installed and control arms   Struts assembled, test fitting calipers   Fast forward to the fall, and here's the subframe back in the car with the suspension:      

xr4tic

xr4tic

 

Jerry Gallo's Dead.

I'm Jerry Callo!  You will all be happy to know that Shop Manager Poncho turned 98 last March and is still kicking, as well. Skip to the picture of Shop Manager Poncho If you want to get right into the build updates.  But I had some pretty great distractions. I was hell-bent on not being dormant on the FAQ for this long, but it happened. Life happened. It's still happening! 15 whole months without a blog entry. Work on the '02 has not stopped. However we did get into some other things during those months. But first - Benchmark abrasives is running a promo for flap discs. https://benchmarkabrasives.com/collections/flap-discs/products/4-1-2-x-7-8-t29-zirconia-high-density-flap-disc-mixed-grit-10-pack promo code: FREEMIX Just pay for shipping. Discs came in 2 days. 10 discs for 10 bucks. Anyone buying flap discs knows this is a great deal. The distractions from the '02:  In September 2017 I rode my first dirtbike. Instantly hooked. 4 days later I bought my first dirt bike.  2006 Honda CRF450X. Still hooked. Quite possibly the most fun I have ever had. This took up most of my weekends, so work on the BMW slowed. That October we decided to trade in the Abarth while it was still worth something and get something that is utilitarian and safe for a growing family. We ended up with a Colorado Z71 Duramax Diesel – to haul the dirt bike of course! (and trailers full of cars). So far I have 11,000 miles averaging 27mpg doing both. Great buy, most fuel efficient car we own and pretty comfy. Last November I took a metal shaping class with Robert McCartney of McCartney Paint and Customs and another metal shaper, Pat Brubaker who is out of the mid-West. Robert's shop is in Southern Maryland and runs a class every year. It wasn't cheap but it was some of the best education I have received in a long time. These guys are incredibly skilled and talented.  I hammered, rolled and bent up a lower patch for a driver side fender.  I liken it coding.  The immense logic is what is confusing.  The difficulty is in its simplicity.  It took me 2 days to make the panel.  The instructors said it would take them just a few hours.    July 2018 – picked up a Porsche 356, Pre-A.   Wait, what? Yup. And it's pretty much complete. It was outside for the last 30 years well wrapped under tarps, but now its in a nice dry garage, up on stands. Floor needs to be redone and a bunch more, but this project does not get touched until the '02 is registered and on the road. This is my way of ensuring I do not have 2, half done projects and no money. It has also been a direct motivator to keep moving on the '02.   October 7th, 2018 I became a dad! She is awesome and perfect and will be a great shop assistant, President, F1 Champ, MotoCross Champ, plumber, electrician, welder, CEO, accountant, or whatever else she wants to be.  I. Am. Stoked.   I picked up some extra tools in that time as well. I found a Harbor freight English wheel on craigslist for 200 bucks. That was well worth the money. That has made metal shaping so much easier. The anvils were not machined super smooth but they do seem to be true. I took them to work and buffed out the rolling surfaces to a semi mirror finish. 4130 is tough steel, so the buffing took quite a while. This makes working with metal much easier and the finish much nicer. It makes the panel closer to paintable right off the bat because I'm not stuck trying to planish out all the little marks from the manual and hammer bends. I also picked up an Everlast 185DV AC/DC TIG welder from Home Depot. They carry them online. I have the Home Depot credit card so I bought it with a few other things and got 24 months 0% financing. I also asked them to match the sale price on the Everlast website and they did. So I got it shipped to my local HD for free, and it even came with a pedal, which is a rare win, apparently. I got a great No. 2 Arbor press from a a guy near Baltimore and a bunch of ball peen hammers and big chunks of steel both stainless and carbon. I've been using it all.   On to the build updates! I'll try to detail out the progress on the '02 without too much lost information. Last post was about the driver side rear quarter patch panel and the new shop. In my haste to do more visual body work, I put off replacing the inner fender on the rear driver side wheel well. That was a really poor decision. It was very difficult to fit and weld in the inner fender once the outer fender was already in place. This took a lot of extra time and was, honestly, a deterrent for getting in the garage. I did finally get it welded in, and with pretty good results, but it wasn't easy, or fun.  Work inside out, not outside in. Once that was done I moved back to the front of the car and welded the upper firewall back in. I filled a few holes in it, welded it back in, and moved on. I cut off some metal on the support bracket that goes from the upper firewall back to the heater box cut away, so that had to be replaced as well.   Next up was round two on my first repair, the lower part of the passenger inner wing. I cut out my original, flux core repair panel along with my homemade frame rail. I had a new frame rail from W&N so I decided to use it. I positioned my new frame rail per factory specs and tried to fit up my sub frame to double check. No good. Aligning pins didn't line up. I knew that the car had been in an accident or three, so I wasn't too surprised. The front sub frame had damage, but its pretty stout, so I didn't think it was warped. A closer look however proved that it had racked about a 1/4”. which is quite a bit. Grice was nice enough to pull one out of his stash for me. A quick check with the new, color matching sub frame proved a good fit. Frame rail aligned, subframe holding square, I started plug welding the frame rail to the passenger floor pan. Once that was in I moved to mocking up a patch panel for the inner wing. First out of cardboard, then transferring the rough template to 18 gauge sheet steel. I cut it out roughly with an angle grinder, then did more detailed work with my throat-less shear.   Fit up was difficult because there were a lot of compound curves in this lower area. The English wheel proved to be a good investment. Trimming and fitting took a long time. I rolled in a structural feature to match (somewhat) the factory look with my bead roller. I filed down the patch panel to get pretty close to a line on line fitment, then trimmed the bottom and added 1/4” holes for plug welds. I had an old 1/4” drill bit so I ground the tip flat. I used this to clean out the paint under the hole for the plug weld. This helped ensure I had no contaminants in the weld. The panel was then welded in and welds ground smooth where possible. Thankfully, that was the last of the structural repairs. Next was to fit up the nose. In order to do that, I wanted to get the fenders and doors on to make sure it will all line up before anything is welded in. I put on the fenders that Jim (jgerock) gave me and put on the doors. Initial fitment looked pretty good. There is something funky going on on the passenger side.  I'm hoping it's a door hanging adjustment.  Bottom of fender collides with door when opening it.  More investigation required. There was a huge dent in the driver door that I forgot about. I ended up bringing it down to bare metal and used some heat to get 80 percent of it out, I made a weld on slide hammer and pulled as much of the rest out as I could. Looks pretty good.  Will need to do some Bondo work to get it right.   There was a small crack near the top of the door, where another dent was. I hammered out the dent then TIG'd up the crack. Smallest tungsten I have is 3/32”. 1/16" would have been better, as I likely wouldn't have burned in the undercut at the edge. The door skin was covered in Bondo and was still pretty warped. I decided to pull the paint on the door.  I am using paint stripper on the door skin.  If I keep it away from seams and holes I should be able to eliminate any residue issues when it comes to paint.   I found that after pulling the Bondo, the door had a better shape. I'm not sure why. It still needs working but its a start. A shrinking disk will be useful, or a terrible idea.   Work continues!        

peterman

peterman

The heart...it beats

Been suuuuuper busy lately. Family, work, school, expensive hobbies - you know how that goes.   I did finally get around to making a proper dolly for the shell, it's way better than those furniture movers I was using prior. Still, 4 rubber wheels that all swivel make this thing hard to turn and steer. If I was to do it again I would use a metal caster.     Not much has happened to the shell, I'm still dreading the daunting task of welding and grinding. I'll just save the worst for last. I did install the hood pins though. Also I'm in the process of chemically stripping the paint off the hood so it can get sent off to have louvers put in.     The biggest and best thing to happen yet on this build is that the motor is finally finished! Well except for the fact that it's missing a set of RD headers, if anyone has a lead HMU. Looks super awesome, I almost want to put it behind glass. No expenses were spared for this motor. A lot of cool and one-off or things you will never see again in your life got put into this.   - First off I made heim-jointed alternator belt adjuster a la @AceAndrew came out perfect and works like a charm. In conjunction with that I had to make a custom bolt to mount it to the block. - All ARP everything - Knife edged the crank - Billet Alum 7075 IE rocker arms (don't ask there are none for sale) - A whole bunch of other expensive racing crap I don't have time to mention, (check my spec sheet in a previous blog post)   Enjoy the pics!     Now I think that the only thing left that I have to do is give this thing more blood, sweat, and tears before it's ready for paint. All my parts are already built. More updates to come!

02tradition

02tradition

How much pressure am I under!!!???

Ok so in light of the fact that fuel pressure is very, very important to fuel injection operating correctly.  I decided to get a digital fuel pressure gauge for the car.  With old gas tanks, and aftermarket parts and fuel system, you really don't know how the car is going to react.  Rather than guessing what it is, or if something is going wrong, I can take fuel pressure out of the pool of questions.   I also wanted to see the change in fuel pressure under different driving conditions.    Worst case scenario, I replace my existing oil pressure gauge with this one, as it matches my current AEM afr gauge.     The Sniper EFI allows you to manually correct for actual fuel pressure in the software.  So it can factor in pressure that may be slightly higher or lower than the desired fuel pressure of 59-60 PSI.  The -6 to -6 fitting will also help because the existing -6 coming from my tank will be too short, as I realized only later that the fuel inlets will be facing forward.    If this thing does work then I will likely replace the pump with a returnless in tank unit when I get my gas tank re-done.  At some point in the tank's history, the bottom was dented in, not enough to really worry about, but it still needs to be addressed.      So this morning while I was having my coffee I came up with this from Summit.    AER-FBM2183 FITTING Ready to Ship $9.99 1 $9.99  (-6 an to -6 an with a 1/8 NPT hole for fuel pressure sensor) AVM-30-4401 FLUID PRESSURE GAUGE OIL/WATER Ready to Ship $195.79 1 $195.79 (fuel pressure gauge, although it says oil/water) SUM-220687 -06 90 HOSE END SWIVEL Ready to Ship $12.59 1 $12.59 (swivel fitting for fuel) SUM-220688 6AN 120 DEGREE HOSE END Ready to Ship $15.29 1 $15.29 (swivel fitting for fuel) SUM-220690 6AN HOSE END STRAIGHT Ready to Ship $4.49 1 $4.49 (swivel fitting for fuel) SUM-220691 6AN 150 DEGREE HOSE END Ready to Ship $15.29 1 $15.29 (swivel fitting for fuel)    Express shipping to Canada hurt a little  ($40 vs 18) and brokerage was higher by about $15,         

Dudeland

Dudeland

Slow summer

Progress on the 02s has been slow. I’ve been placing orders here and there for little things mostly-hardware, rebuild kits, exhaust, seals, etc. The type of stuff that you forget about until it’s 10:30 on a Sunday and you realize you don’t have enough clips to install the trim.    The ‘73 now has both right side floor pans replaced. I’ve also replaced the last 18” or so of the frame rail on the right side. There is still some welding to do on those pans but I want the car in the air for that so that I can massage alignment from within the tunnel. Things are plenty strong enough to prevent movement now as is.     I welded an outer wheel housing back on this car and put the quarter panel back on as well after removing the arch. I’m still pondering how to connect the quarter and housing. The easy route would be to fold things over and weld it together. Not being one to take the easy way out typically I’m thinking about getting some 1/8” or 3/16” rod and bending it to create a rounded transition between the housing and outer skin. I believe it will also help to hold the shape of the outer skin as I massage to housing to fit.      I removed the tail panel and the remains of the trunk floor earlier this year. That was a quick project since there were only a handful of inches of seams at the back panel still attached and leading edge cut quite easily. The panel forward of the diff support will be replaced as well. The panel collected water for too long and thinned considerably. It has several large holes as well. I salvaged the replacement from the ‘69 shell.    After re-attaching the right QP I attempted to start the car so that I could flip it around in the tent only to realize the clutch was stuck. 3rd gear, one foot on the clutch, one on the brake I hit the key. The rear end climbed and then *POP*. The car settled back down and was running in gear with no forward motion. I let my foot out of the clutch and nothing... no clunking, no dragging noises, no movement. 😳 I pondered what might have happened while I pushed the car around by hand in the yard. Looking under the car I could see that the guibo was still intact and the driveshaft spun when the car was pushed. Peculiar addition, the clutch pedal was now rock hard; the only movement being the play in the bushings. For the next few days I contemplated the possible failures- sheared input shaft, broken clutch disc, broken pressure plate, internal shaft failure in the trans. When I finally jacked the car up to repair the failure I was relieved to see that the clutch slave was fully stroked. A gentle tap with a hammer rewarded me with a fully operational clutch and a car that once again moves under its own power. This car hasn’t been moved in several years and the clutch slave does not currently have a boot on the piston end so there ya have it.    Feeling a little flush with cash the other day I sprang for a rebuild kit for 2bbl Solex. The car doesn’t wanna idle and I don’t have a spare Weber laying around for it so for $26 I’m gonna make this one better for now. The carb body is currently soaking in a bucket of cleaner awaiting a rebuild. Some of the passages were almost 100% plugged with varnish.    My current goals beyond rebuilding this carb is to get the outer wheelhouse back on the ‘68 along with the new right rocker and tack in the trunk/back seat divider panel, tack on the quarter that I will repair for that car, install the complete rear suspension from the ‘69, move that car to a storage space off site and bring the ‘73 into the garage for major work over the winter. All I need is time now. 

VWJake

VWJake